Visual Art | St. Louis Public Radio

Visual Art

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 14, 2012 - A great deal of energy is spent shutting down sorrow -- in ourselves and others. No one wants to break into tears in front of the boss or sob uncontrollably on the Metrolink, and we’re uncomfortable when others do.

But British-Nigerian video artist Zina Saro-Wiwa encourages crying. Her contribution to the Pulitzer Foundation’s Nov. 16-April 20 exhibit, “The Progress of Love,” is two videos, one in which five actresses cry on cue, the other in which she’s weeping for her murdered father.

Review: Artist incubation working at St. Louis Artists' Guild

Nov 13, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 13, 2012 - The Oak Knoll Park parking lot filled to the last spot on the opening night of the current Louis Artists’ Guild exhibit.

The event featured Tate Foley and Will Arnold’s dual From Sea to Shining Sea; Denise Schilling’s photographic coming-of-age exploration, On the Cusp; and Eugene Ruble’s crowded curio works, Absolute Abstracts.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 2, 2012 - Even teetotalers should plan a visit to Vino to see the work hanging on the walls. The married artists known as Gaucha Berlin and Langley, along with their enchanting many-layered mixed media canvases and sculptural work, can usually be found along Cherokee. Their current show at Vino brings some of that good Cherokee Street creative impulse to the comparatively established Central West End art scene.

Review: The Luminary offers unique vantage for viewing St. Louis

Oct 24, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 24, 2012 - Is Cherokee the pounding heart or the soul of St. Louis? Is it the clever, turning mind or the third eye gazing at our arch/navel? However you parse it, Cherokee is a vital part of our city anatomy. 

Review: Nelson's 'Songs' brighten Atrium Gallery

Oct 9, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 9, 2012 - Local St. Louis favorite Fredrick Nelson presents new works at Atrium Gallery. His exhibit, “Songs Without Words – New Works on Paper,” delivers lovely color stories soaked in rhythmic detail.

Review: Kemper offers important glimpse of inspiration

Oct 5, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 5, 2012 - Every so often an exhibit comes around that presents the spark of an idea, displaying the preliminary thoughts captured when an artist grabs hold of pencil and paper. Notations: Contemporary Drawing as Idea and Process, at Washington University’s Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, does just this.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 3, 2012 - Seven jewelry creators bring their work to Clasp, the latest exhibit at Craft Alliance at Grand Center curated by Robert Longyear. Conceived as a show about making connections, Clasp highlights the body as landscape.

Review: Zinsser brings bold strokes to Philip Slein

Oct 1, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 1, 2012 - On view at Philip Slein Gallery is New York-based John Zinsser’s Zero Guilt. Zinsser presents nine canvases of painted abstractions, celebrating color in bold strokes. The paintings have a Japanese-aura, emitting lovely interplays of light and density, juxtaposing orange and brown or light yellow with deeper yellow.  

Review: 'B. Wurtz' demands attention at White Flag

Sep 26, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 26, 2012 - What may first appear as a hipster delight of neon deconstruction slowly becomes a captivating presentation of B. Wurtz’s found materials and assembled wit. B. Wurtz, a survey of the artist’s sculpture from 1980 to the present at White Flag Projects, is smartly curated.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 24, 2012 -  Joan Hall’s “Marginal Waters” transforms the open space at the Bruno David Gallery with swooping forms and organic textures, creating sculptural water. Inspired by Hall’s passion for the ocean, the exhibit balances the artist’s task of capturing the ocean’s beauty while commenting on its contemporary man-made struggles, highlighting both its elegance and its deterioration.

Review: The myriad forms of 'Paper'

Sep 18, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 18, 2012 - Paper, a group exhibit of 14 local artists, explores various mediums created on paper. Paintings, etchings, drawings, and collages fill the gallery at the Regional Arts Commission presenting a diverse set of themes and artistic sensibilities.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 17, 2012After a dozen or so years of marriage, Virginia Benson’s vibrant husband George started asking strange questions.

“What did we do yesterday? We’re going somewhere today -- do I know the people?” Virginia Benson remembered.

From day 111: An old dress helps create a new memory

Sep 14, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept 14, 2012 - When Jennifer Finley was 3, she wore the blue dress. It was a royal blue, with lace trim on the sleeves, a band of lace and three red roses across the front. It hit her spindly legs mid-thigh. She can’t remember that day at all, but it exists, like those memories created from years of hearing a story second-hand. 

Peter Manion III: His artwork showcases internal battles

Aug 28, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 28, 2012 - The abstract renderings of St. Louis artist Peter Manion III, offer his audience a narrative experience: to see his work is to see the artist himself.

Each piece, from “Give me a kiss” to “Seasons of labor” to “The way we live” to his latest works, reflects Manion, his experience, his life and times. All share the underpinnings of the artist’s internal battle. Cerebral and primal, Manion seeks definition with each stroke.

Review: 'Biotextural Landscapes' blooms at Good Citizen

Aug 18, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 18, 2012 - Any art enthusiast should stop in Good Citizen Gallery before"Biotextural Landscapes" finishes on Sept. 29. Displaying four sculptures by Craig Wedderspoon, "Biotextural Landscapes" lives up to the complexity of its name, delivering a gallery floor sprouting, or blooming, in forms.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 15, 2012 - Hal Moran of St. Charles considers himself gifted, not disabled.

Sure, his Tourette syndrome, ADD and dyslexia can make life difficult, but they also enhance his existence. Through an unlikely chain, that enhancement is helping to improve the lives of people in Kenya, Uganda and other African nations, thanks to a local arts organization.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 13, 2012 - Long before Cbabi Bayoc set out to paint “365 Days with Dad,” he was committed to promoting black fatherhood through his art.

Bayoc admittedly launched the 2012 project help him make a living. But his devotion to portraying effective, involved African-American fathers stems from a decades-long passion and is just one example of the power of visual art to bring about change.

Reflection: The artist in me emerges for animals

Aug 10, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 10, 2012 - I mentioned to the editor I work with at the Beacon that an interesting story existed in the Urban Wanderers exhibit at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art, but I couldn't write it for a number of reason, including the fact that I have art in it. Write about that, she said; write about being an artist...

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Aug. 6, 2012 - An array of works in a variety of media decorates the Regional Arts Commission gallery this summer. Paintings, photographs, terra cotta and mixed media sculpture all sit on display as part of the show TRADITION! (as uttered by Zero Mostel in “Fiddler on the Roof”).

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 7, 2012 - For many of us, an attic is a dark, dusty place where old furniture or family heirlooms go to hibernate. For St. Louis-based artist Bunny Burson, items in her attic provided inspiration for a captivating body of work, as more than 100 letters revealed a lost portion of family tragedy.

Written by her grandparents from 1939-41 to their daughter living in the United States, the letters exposed their failed attempts to flee Germany and, later, Latvia during Nazi occupation. Intimate relationships and stories formerly unknown to the artist, these letters have been reincarnated through prints, collages, and installations in Burson’s exhibit, Hidden in Plain Sight.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, May 18, 2012 - We live in nasty, contentious times, but what else is new? The last time we had a non-contentious moment was in the mythological paradise of pre-apple Eden, but once the apple was tasted, contentment, peace, simplicity -- all were sacrificed in favor of knowledge, which apparently begets disorder and incivility and things entirely worse: the legacy of Cain, murder.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, March 7, 2012 -She was in high school when he began to see it, that spark for things created from her own mind with her own hands. 

A decade ago, Tom Brady was 55, a successful financial adviser with 23 years in the business. For all that time, boxes sat in the basement of his Mehlville home that told of another life and another self.

That’s how it seemed, at least.

Review: Stezaker releases meanings in old images

Feb 19, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 19, 2012 - The retrospective of British artist John Stezaker’s work at the Kemper Art Museum is nothing short of marvelous. Since the 1970s, Stezaker has collaged, cut up or otherwise intervened in found photographs — old postcards, Hollywood film stills, old travel brochures and the like. His small scale works subvert the original intentions of the images.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 19, 2012 - Christodoulos Panayiotou’s “One Thousand and One Days,” it seems, comes to the Contemporary at precisely the right time. Just as we’re in the midst of the race for the Republican nomination for the next presidential election, it’s interesting to reflect on the general subjects of power and representation — how one authority figure represents the will of a constituency, for instance, or how a public face of authority is constructed and circulated.

How will you react to Cruzen's props?

Feb 12, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 21, 2012 - Jake Cruzen’s “Nikki and Jan” at Los Caminos is a conceptual exhibit, consisting of two props in different locations.

The first of the props is the show announcement, featured on Los Caminos’ website and in some printed flyers: a photograph of two pretty girls, relaxing in a park, along with a narrative account of the photographer’s chance encounter with them.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 29, 2012 - The works by New York based Tommy Hartung and Uri Aran on view at White Flag Projects give an idea of the artists' unusual working relationship.

They're not exactly collaborators, producing things together that bear both names. It's probably more accurate to say that the sensibilities, interests and outlook of one artist bleed gently into that of the other as they make their individual works.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 18, 2012 - Local artist Sandra Marchewa has created "Pills, Thrills, and Bellyaches," a gem of a work at Isolation Room and perfect for the gallery's intimate dimensions, which allow you to get up close and study its brilliant, joyful detail.

On a translucent sheet of Plexi, Marchewa has created thousands of tiny circles, each harboring a surprising little icon.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 17, 2012 - "Out of the Box: Artists Play Chess" is a terrific inaugural art exhibit for the World Chess Hall of Fame, which opened last year across the street from the Chess Club and Scholastic Center in the Central West End.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 9, 2012 - The Rev. Anne Kelsey, visibly moved, advanced to the front of the nave of Trinity Episcopal Church Sunday morning and spoke to her parishioners of a paradox, in this instance the intersection of lives ending and beginning.

She told them one of their number, Marjorie Hoeltzel, had died at 90 of a massive stroke. As her daughter Rebecca Glenn said, "She took her last sweet breath at 12:30 on Saturday morning."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 11, 2011 - Pinholio at Good Citizen Gallery showcases the huge variety of approaches to pinhole photography available to artists today.

It's actually three shows in one: local artists Mark A. Fisher and Alison Ouellette-Kirby curated a group show from pinhole photographs submitted by national and local artists, and they also brought in works by nationally known pinhole artists Nancy Spencer and Eric Renner, along with original pinhole cameras and photographs by Alabama-based Pinky/MM Bass.

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