voters | St. Louis Public Radio

voters

Provided | The St. Louis County Board of Elections

St. Louis County voters will soon be able to review election results to determine how different areas voted on select candidates and issues.

Starting with the Nov. 6 general election, voters will be able to use an election-results mapping tool to examine regional preferences. Those results likely will be available two weeks after the election. County officials aim to help people interested in regional politics.

A pilot of the interactive tool on the St. Louis County Board of Elections website uses results from the August 2018 primary election to show voter preferences in select races — including county executive and prosecutor, and on ballot issues.

The Board of Aldermen chambers on July 7, 2017.
File photo | Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen has given first-round approval to ballot proposals that would end the city’s residency requirement for most workers, and block the scheduled cut in the board’s size.

But as yet, Mayor Lyda Krewson has not taken a position on either proposal. And Friday’s vote for either measure wouldn’t be enough if she decides to exercise her veto.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 2, 2010 - Area election officials -- particularly in St. Louis and St. Louis County -- say they haven't been affected much by the computer-server problem affecting internet access to the state of Missouri's voter database, which lists all of the state's roughly 4 million registered voters.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 7, 2010 - The 2008 presidential election was significant not only because Barack Obama, an African American, won. It was also a watershed event because Obama energized black voters to the point that they turned out in greater proportions than whites nationally. In Missouri alone, an unprecedented 73 percent of blacks went to the polls.

Rock the vote?

Oct 5, 2010

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Oct. 5, 2010 - In 2008, 51 percent of young people showed up to vote, according to the non-profit, non-partisan Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, or CIRCLE. Among them were Kurseaan Muhammad and Brett Dinkins, though both voted for different candidates. But their reasons for voting in their first election were similar -- they were 18 and there was a buzz in the air around the election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 16, 2010 - They're not too happy with President Barack Obama, although almost half voted for him in 2008.

They're not too keen on U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and are cautiously receptive to the idea of putting Congress back under Republican control.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, June 6, 2010 - The important political status of Missouri -- and St. Louis County -- is highlighted this weekend as national Democrats launch their appeal to voters who first cast ballots in 2008, in hopes of getting them to show up again this fall and vote Democratic.

This weekend marked the beginning of the Democrats' "Vote 2010" campaign, with more than 1,000 events planned just this weekend in all 50 states, including Missouri and Illinois.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 27, 2010 - One of the most interesting storylines to emerge from the 2008 election was the strong youth voter turnout. Just over half of eligible voters in the 18-to-29 age group cast their ballots two Novembers ago, the third highest rate since the voting age was lowered, according to a report from the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University. In Missouri, about 55 percent of voters under 30 went to the polls; in Illinois, about 51 percent, according to CIRCLE estimates.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Sept. 28, 2009 - Republican leaders in Missouri read the polls. Despite  overall improvement in the party's standing in recent months, its biggest obstacle remains among the young.

The 35-and-under vote -- and its overwhelming preference for now-President Barack Obama and fellow Democrats -- helped sweep him into office last year and give the Democrats such a sizable edge in Congress.

Young voters delivered as promised in

Apr 29, 2009

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, April 29, 2009 - One major question leading up to the 2008 presidential election was whether young voters, typically an unreliable bloc, would pack the polls as many had predicted. Nearly six months later, we have an answer.