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Washington University School Of Law

Land of Lincoln Legal Aid Staff Attorney Nicole Massey (right) assists a volunteer at an Expungement Day event in Champaign County in 2018. Land of Lincoln will run a similar even in Woodriver on Sept. 27.
Land of Lincoln Legal Assistance Foundation

WOOD RIVER — More than 7 million people in Illinois have a criminal record, according to the 2016 Survey of State Criminal History Information Systems. And 100 of them in Madison County will take the first step to sealing or expunging their criminal histories on Friday. 

It’s part of the Ready to Work: Madison County Expungement Day event hosted by Land of Lincoln Legal Aid Foundation, a not-for-profit corporation that provides free civil legal services to seniors and low-income residents in central and southern Illinois.

Neighborhood volunteers in Hyde Park clean garbage from the street. Black neighborhoods in St. Louis are more likely to be subject to illegal dumping of potentially hazardous materials. [9/1/19]
LinkSTL

Environmental hazards in the neighborhoods of many black people in St. Louis put them at a higher risk of health problems than white residents, according to a report released Saturday. 

(L-R) Experts Anneliese Schaefer, Deanna Barch and Susan Appleton discussed how neuroscience can help non-scientists understand the impact of early adversity on developing brain.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The early development of the human brain begins in utero and continues into a person’s early-to-mid-20s. In that time, various environmental factors such as poverty, toxins and violence can influence that development. Among adolescent youth, who are susceptible to engaging in risky behavior, the impact of such stressors can also potentially lead to criminal activity.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by a panel of experts to further explore what goes on in the adolescent brain, what may cause some to turn to criminal activity and how the justice system is, or is not, responding. 

Kent D. Syverud
Washington University photo

Kent D. Syverud, dean of the Washington University School of Law, has been appointed as one of two independent trustees of the $20 billion Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Trust fund established by BP to settle claims for damages from the environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico.

In an interview with the Beacon Monday, Syverud said he understands the importance of the position.

“It is a public responsibility, and I care about it and understand the importance of it,’’ he said. “I will do my best.’’