Where the Pavement Ends | St. Louis Public Radio

Where the Pavement Ends

"Where The Pavement Ends" sheds light on the decline of the city of Kinloch and how the roadblock contributed to the fall of the city and the killing of Michael Brown Jr.
Jane Gillooly

As a child, filmmaker and artist Jane Gillooly was oblivious to the fact that Ferguson was an all-white town during the Jim Crow era. Gillooly did not realize this until the day she went home with her babysitter. 

Her sitter lived in Kinloch — Missouri's first incorporated black city. It borders Ferguson. 

At the age of 5, her parents had yet to discuss why blacks and whites were segregated, but she recalls asking the sitter, 'Why does everyone look the same in Kinloch?' and her babysitter said, 'Because all these people are Negroes.'"

Among the films in the series is 'The Kinloch Doc' by Alana Woodson, which traces Kinloch's demise.
Paul Sableman | Wikimedia Commons

ArchCity Defenders uses the cash bail system, the death of Michael Brown Jr. and the movements that grew out of the Ferguson unrest to shine light on racial injustice and inequalities with their second annual racial justice film series. 

The law firm will first showcase “Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin” on Thursday night at the Kranzberg Arts Center. The film, by Nancy Kates and Bennett Singer, outlines the life of gay civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, who served in the background as an organizer of the civil rights movement.