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St. Louis hospital ditches the bed, to help kids recover faster

The opening bars of Whitney Houston’s “How Will I Know” echo through a bustling therapy gym as 13-year-old Courtney Turner practices her physical therapy for the day: lip syncing. A rare infection attacked Turner’s nervous system last year, leaving her almost completely paralyzed. Her doctors called it “a lightning strike”: Once a bubbly preteen who ran track and cracked jokes with her twin brother, she’s spent the past seven months undergoing intense rehabilitation therapy at Ranken Jordan Pediatric Bridge Hospital. During that time, Turner has slowly started to regain some of her muscle movement and reflexes like swallowing food.
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Graphic of woman on crutches overlooking treacherous landscpe
Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

We Live Here: Caring about health in the face of toxic stress

There are a few things we know about health care that are true for everyone. For one thing, it's expensive. It's a nearly $3 trillion industry in the U.S. Also, it's not easy to do well. Mortality rates and hospital admission rates for preventable diseases are higher in the U.S. than other Western countries. So, given that treating people is already a challenging task, imagine the extra challenge that comes from treating people who are experience toxic stress — the stress that comes from...
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St. Louis on the Air

Checking up on Sparo Labs, Arch Grants, entrepreneurship in St. Louis

Med-tech startup Sparo Labs has grown since we last spoke, and St. Louis is home to ever more startups in tech and biomedical industries thanks in part to the funding organization Arch Grants.

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teacher in classroom
U.S. Department of Education

Missouri needs to strike a balance between making sure that all teachers are prepared to enter the classroom and that minorities and women are treated fairly by tests that certify them to teach.

That balance was a main topic of discussion Tuesday at a joint meeting in Columbia between the state Board of Education, which represents interests of K-12 school districts, and the Coordinating Board for Higher Education, which governs public colleges and universities in the state.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Peabody Energy announced Tuesday it has suspended dividend payments to shareholders for the quarter.

The coal giant also reported a $1 billion loss in the second quarter, much of it stemming from a $900 million “asset impairment.” Essentially, the company is correcting its balance sheet, using the market value of its assets rather than previous value.

(Read the Peabody Energy’s earnings report.)

The Gender Unicorn graphic.
Trans Student Educational Resources

As someone who has been disabled almost all her life, Amber Cheek knows how a seemingly kind word or helpful gesture from well-intentioned people can be subtly demeaning.

As the director of accessibility at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Cheek also knows that education and understanding can go a long way toward knowing the right words to say and bridging what she sees is often an information and generation gap.

Gen. Paul Selva, left, and Gen. Darren McDew
Air Force photographs

The U.S. Senate Monday confirmed Gen. Paul Selva to be vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Selva has been the commander of the U.S. Transportation Command at Scott Air Force Base since April 2014. Senators also confirmed Gen Darren McDew to replace Selva as the next commander of the U.S. Transportation Command.

Alex Ihnen (left) and Mary Ostafi (right) joined host Don Marsh in studio.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

A couple of initiatives in downtown St. Louis are changing the way that St. Louis’ old buildings are preserved—by transforming them.

The Missouri Capitol Building
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Within the outcry over state Sen. Paul LeVota’s resignation, one response in particular stood out.

It wasn’t from a Democratic heavy-hitter like Sen. Claire McCaskill or Gov. Jay Nixon. And it didn’t come from a pundit or a journalist. The most poignant reply came from Rachel Gonzalez, a 16-year-old student who is president of the High School Democrats of Missouri.

A flounder house on Ohio Aveue in St. Louis
via Flckr | Michael Allen

Several architecturally significant proposals are up for discussion Monday in St. Louis at the city’s preservation board meeting.

A review of four nominations for national register listings, a proposal to build a seven-story apartment building in the Central West End, and the results of a survey of the city’s “flounder” houses are all on the agenda.  

Flounder houses were built in the mid-19th-century with one wall higher than the other, giving the building a distinctive triangular shape.

Sen. Roy Blunt talked with the media early last week. july 2015
Jim Howard | St. Louis Public Radio

In a rare Sunday session, the U.S. Senate gave overwhelming approval to a plan to re-authorize the charter of the Export-Import Bank, as part of its six-year highway bill.  The bank’s charter expired in June.  All four U.S. senators from Missouri and Illinois voted for the plan, backed by Democrats and mainstream Republicans. Tea Party Republicans have long opposed the bank, calling it “corporate welfare” for big business. Supporters disagree and say the bank helps businesses of all sizes.

Republican GOP - RIGHT WIDTH - also avail. gopelephantleft
Wikipedia

(Updated 2 p.m. Mon., July 27)

Missouri’s Republican contest for governor has gotten less crowded — at least for now — as state Sen. Mike Parson has decided to run for the state’s No. 2 post instead. And on Monday, he released a list of supporters, including the state Senate's leadership.

Meanwhile, the GOP’s newest gubernatorial candidate — state Sen. Bob Dixon of Springfield — offered some details about his previously acknowledged past in the 1980s when he lived several years as a young gay man.

In an emailed statement to St. Louis Public Radio, Dixon blamed child abuse for what he called “teenage confusion.” He now is married, has three children and is a staunch social conservative who believes in traditional marriage.

Chase Bond, 4, of Ferguson gets a haircut from Deyana Williams of the Elaine Steven Beauty College Saturday, July 25, 2015 in Forestwood Park during the Day of Hope outreach fair.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Cars lined the street leading to Forestwood Park in Ferguson Saturday for a resource fair organized by a faith-based non-profit that specializes in disaster relief and outreach to the poor.

Convoy of Hope’s “Day of Hope” provided a free meal and a kid’s carnival to anyone who stopped by the park, along with health screenings, haircuts, and other goods and services.

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Community Engagement

The Listening Project: Why is it hard to find affordable housing?

Chris Krehmeyer of Beyond Housing explains that few new units are built and roadblocks can trip up those looking