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A rendering of the proposed riverfront stadium
Courtesy of HOK

Lawmakers stage all-out blitz on Nixon's ability to extend stadium bonds by fiat

After being stuffed in the General Assembly, skeptics of a proposed riverfront stadium in St. Louis are taking their fight to court. Six lawmakers filed a suit Wednesday in Cole County Circuit Court to, among other things, prevent Gov. Jay Nixon from “extending” state bonds paying off the Edward Jones Dome to fund the new stadium. Office of Administration Director Doug Nelson contended earlier this year that Nixon had such authority, which spurred unsuccessful bills to force either a legislative or statewide vote on the matter.
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Cityscape

Circus Flora returns for 29th season with ‘One Summer on Second Street’

"Cityscape" host Steve Potter spoke with Circus Flora's artistic director Jack Marsh and theater director Cecil MacKinnon.

Cut & Paste Podcast

Cut & Paste podcast: Syna So Pro plays it cool, but she's got a hot date

The St. Louis artist sings and plays violin, bass guitar and keyboard -- all at once.

St. Louis Life

Wreath of Sanity by Eileen Cheong, art therapist
Nancy Fowler

UMSL show reveals talent, emotions of those with mental illness; others can learn and enjoy

One out of every four people will experience mental illness in any given year. And 100 percent of them can be artists, according to an exhibit at UMSL’s Gallery 210.
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Photo Flood Photographer Jeni Kulka's September 20th Image in Tower Grove Park
Photo Flood Photographer Jeni Kulka

Summer Concerts: Berries match up well with Great Rivers, and Tower Grove is always a treat

With the way the weather has been going on the weekend, just pick what you're interested in and head out. The rain seems to come for a bit but not necessarily wipe things out. Hope that statement isn't a jinx.
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Classical Music

Classical 90.7 KWMU-3

Classical music 24-7. Listen online or with an HD radio.

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch announces that the grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson on any of five counts that were presented to it.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updated 4:30 p.m. May 29 with suit filed in state court - A grand juror who served in the Darren Wilson case is taking a lawsuit against St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch to state court.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri says its client hopes to challenge secrecy requirements that prevent talking freely about the grand jury investigation and what evidence was presented. In a release, the ACLU says the grand juror wants to contribute to public discussions on race relations.

via Flickr\Orbspiders

What is art?

That is the question Alton, Ill. residents and council members debated after the owner of a tattoo parlor, Grand Piasa Body Art, proposed relocating his business to East Broadway Street, in the city’s historic downtown district.

Hazelwood Logistics Center, Paul McKee
(MARIA ALTMAN, ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO/MAPBOX, OPENSTREETMAP)

Paul McKee’s Hazelwood Logistics Center now belongs to a Kansas City company.

NP Hazelwood 140 held an auction Friday of all of Hazelwood Logistics Center’s assets and land, then entered the only bid of $9.2 million.

Far Lft, Brian Owens; Middle Lft, Sara Michaelis; Middle Rt, Stanley Johnson; Far Rt, Sonya Murray
Alex Heuer

The St. Louis Symphony and Maryville University collaborated to create an 8-week music therapy program called “Life Compositions” to help students at Confluence Academy Old North deal with the challenges and trauma of growing up in urban neighborhoods. Graduate students in Maryville’s music therapy program worked with the youth to write and record songs, which they will highlight in a concert titled “Courage Counts” on June 4.

Gokul Venkatachalam talks with media as his younger brother holds the National Spelling Bee trophy
Courtesy of Scripps National Spelling Bee

Last night, one word stood between 14-year-old Chesterfield resident Gokul Venkatachalam, $35,000 and a National Spelling Bee championship. That word was “nunatak” which Merriam-Webster defines as “a hill or mountain completely surrounded by glacial ice.” When the final word was announced Venkatachalam said he knew what to do.

“I was just thinking focus and get my word right.”

I started off wondering whether I might be able to spell a few of the words right. I ended up realizing that most of them I had never even heard of before.

Iridocyclitis. Cibarial. Pyrrhuloxia. And so on.

It was one of the many surprises of an evening spent watching the finals of the Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday night near Washington.

Another big surprise was how much I thoroughly enjoyed it.

I had expected to see a bunch of highly trained kids who've spent months and years memorizing the dictionary, essentially regurgitating that information.

Martin Duggan
The Nine Network

St. Louis lost two memorable citizens this week -- groundbreakers in very different ways. Environmentalist Leo Drey and journalist Martin Duggan were known for the causes they championed. They will be remembered as well for their character and caring.

alt-rock band American Authors
courtesy Fair St. Louis

Country, rock and R&B fans will all have a free night of entertainment tailored to their interests this summer during Fair St. Louis.

Additional artists performing at the fair were announced Thursday: alt-rock band American Authors, bluesy pop singer Noah Guthrie, R&B trio Tony! Toni! Toné! and pioneering female rapper MC Lyte. Local band Dirty Muggs will also take a turn on stage.

Affinia Healthcare employees listen to a press conference held by Missouri Senator Roy Blunt. Affinia has increased its staff by 16 percent in the past four years with an influx of funding from the Affordable Care Act.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Republican Senator Roy Blunt visited a community health clinic in north St. Louis Thursday and pledged support for the model, which uses federal funds to provide basic healthcare services for people who are uninsured or living in poverty.   

The Affordable Care Act included an increase in funding to community health centers over the past five years. Congress has extended the funding for another two years.

Granite City Steel Mill
Davd Schaper|NPR

Updated at 11:30 a.m., May 28, 2015:

U.S. Steel now says it will not be temporarily shutting down its plant in Granite City. The company announced on Thursday that it will continue to operate one blast furnace and another will be off while new equipment is installed.

U.S. Congressman Mike Bost’s office says about 80 workers will be laid off as production is modified.

The steel maker had announced plans in March to temporarily idle the plant in a move that would have affected more than 2,000 workers (see below.) The company closed coke ovens in Granite City earlier this year, leaving 176 people out of work.

Our earlier story:

A Metro East community is dealing with the temporary shutdown of a major employer for the second time in less than a decade.

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We Live Here

Graphic: How do Missouri's public defenders stack up?

If you’re too poor to afford your own lawyer, you may be assigned an attorney who is managing more than 100 cases. Is that worse than elsewhere?

Public Insight Network

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Become part of our Public Insight Network. We use the PIN to get insight from people like you. Today's question: What do recommendations for changes to veterans health care mean to you?

Community Engagement

The Listening Project: What's the best way to build up communities?

At North Side Community School, family members discuss how they're investing in improving the Fairgrounds neighborhood.