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These renderings show what it would look like in National Car Rental Field. The car rental company forged a $158 million deal to name an in-flux riverfront stadium.
Courtesy of HOK

What does stadium naming deal mean for St. Louisans' dreams of keeping Rams?

Dave Peacock concedes that he undersold a bit to Enterprise Holdings when he talked with some of their top brass about sponsoring a roughly $1 billion stadium. The co-chairman of a task force angling to keep professional football in St. Louis said on Wednesday he went in with a “lower sponsorship level” to Enterprise, a St. Louis-based corporation that owns a number of car rental companies. What Peacock got in return was a 20-year, $158 million offer to name the stadium “National Car Rental Field.”
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Saturday evening at a Schnucks in Des Peres.
Wayne Pratt|St. Louis Public Radio

National 'Grocery Wars' hit St. Louis region prompting stores to adjust to more competition

The retail grocery industry in the St. Louis region and throughout the country is more competitive than ever. Local chains that have been around for decades are adapting to customer expectations as they face increasing pressure from big-name national stores and even discount outlets.
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Friday: Peter Martin teams with other local greats in ‘What Lies Ahead'

"Cityscape" host Steve Potter will speak with Peter Martin about his newest album.

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Jameela Tidwell (left) and Molicia Hammond dissect a from Tues. Oct. 6, 2015 in the Upward Bound program at SIUE's East St. Louis Center. Both are sophomores at East St. Louis Senior High.
Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville | provided

Thursday marked the sixth school day with no class for the more than 6,000 students in East St. Louis School District 189 as teachers continue to strike. Contract negotiations between the district and the teachers' union appear to have hit a stand-still.

Since the strike began, six community centers with after-school programming have extended their hours and opened their enrollment to all students in the district. The centers also provide lunch. The idea is to keep students safe and in a routine, but so far only a fraction of the district’s students are taking advantage of the centers.

peter.a photography | Flickr

Backers of medical marijuana want Missourians to decide if doctors can be allowed to prescribe the drug to critically ill patients.

Two ballot initiatives that would do just that were filed on Thursday.

This National League Central Division series will be historic: The Cards and Cubs are facing one another for the first time ever in the postseason, and the best-of-five series opens Friday at Busch Stadium.

As rivalries go, this one is tops. But our money’s on Cardinals fans because when it comes to the proper waving of rally towels they’ve had lots of experience.

(Courtesy: St. Louis Symphony)

The Missouri Arts Council is giving away $4.2 million in grants in the coming year. The funding is slightly less than last year’s allotment. According to the council’s executive director Michael Donovan, the lower amount is the result of static funding from state government.

“We were also spending money down that was in a cultural trust, and this is at the request of the legislature. So this year, since that money’s been spent down over the years, we didn’t have as much this year to spend down as we did the previous year,” said Donovan.

Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

The crisis in Syria is on everyone’s minds right now—whether for humanitarian concerns, worries over ISIS or Russian involvement. Here at home, several groups have made the call to accept more Syrian refugees to the St. Louis region. So far, 29 have arrived since the beginning of this year.

But what about Syrians who have already come to St. Louis? What is their life like here? And how have they settled into local society and culture?  On Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” two Syrians who came to St. Louis under different circumstances shared their stories of becoming part of the community and how they juggle their relationship with their birth country.

St. Louis Dancers Step-Up co-founder Keith Williams works with performers for Dance Speaks Volume I.
Sara Burke

For more than a year, St. Louis dance professionals have worked to create a performance responding to the death of Michael Brown.

On Friday at 7 p.m., the public can see the result of their efforts at Centene Center for the Arts, 3547 Olive St., in Grand Center. “Dance Speaks Volume I" is presented by St. Louis Dancers Step-Up, in cooperation with the Grand Center Arts Academy Theatre Department.

On Chess: Millionaire Chess offers high gloss and high risk

23 hours ago
Tournament hall from the 2014 Millionaire Chess tournament.
Millionaire Chess 2014

Part of any good chess player's repertoire includes gambits, sacrifices and risks. Specific player's style of play makes them take this path more often than others; this includes those who prefer a high risk/high reward situation rather than consistency.

Sen. Gina Walsh
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Tim Lloyd welcome state Sen. Gina Walsh, D-Bellefontaine Neighbors, to the program for the second time.

She represents the 13th District, a north St. Louis County area that encompasses portions of Ferguson and Dellwood. Walsh spent nearly three decades as part of the Heat and Frost Insulators and Allied Workers Local #1, and she's currently the president of the Missouri State Building & Construction Trades Council.

Courtesy of Thompson Coburn

In late August, at a party in the Central West End, a dapper fellow, a lawyer named Fred Arnold, spoke warmly of his planned move to a new home in the neighborhood. Compared to his old but quite elegant digs in the suburbs, he saw life in the urban neighborhood as stimulating and exciting, and he appreciated the warm welcomes he’d already received.

On Monday this week, Mr. Arnold, a lawyer, civic leader and philanthropist, died at Barnes-Jewish Hospital before he was able to make the transition. He was 77 years old.

Ameren Missouri

Missouri's Department of Economic Development has unveiled 17 recommendations for how Missouri should use and conserve energy.

The recommendations are the end result of an executive order Gov. Jay Nixon issued last year that was intended to "chart a road map toward a more prosperous, secure and sustainable energy future."


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