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Missouri legislature sends student transfer bill to Nixon

For the second year in a row, Missouri lawmakers have sent a proposed fix to the state's student transfer law to Gov. Jay Nixon.
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St. Louis on the Air

Today: 'The Blue Line'

“St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh talked to Terrell Carter, a former St. Louis City police officer about racial division in St. Louis.

We Live Here

The life and times of a police officer.

In this week's podcast, we explore the police perspective. From what it's like on the day-to-day beat to coping with racism within police departments.

Community Engagement

The Listening Project: What's the best way to build up communities?

At North Side Community School, family members discuss how they're investing in improving the Fairgrounds neighborhood.

Arts in education

A sampling of teacups at McCluer High School
Nancy Fowler

McCluer High School students toast to future in teacup art project

A year that began with the trauma of Michael Brown’s death is ending on more positive note, thanks to a traditional tea ceremony this morning at McCluer High School. Calls of “To McCluer!” between principal Jane Crawford and the students, and their shared sipping, marked the official ceremony.
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Paul McKee
St. Louis Public Radio

PNC Bank files federal suit against McKee

Paul McKee’s legal woes are growing. PNC Bank filed a federal lawsuit late last week in the Southern District of Illinois. It claims McKee, several of his holding companies and the former Corn Belt Bank & Trust defaulted on an $8 million loan from a PNC predecessor.
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Classical Music

Classical 90.7 KWMU-3

Classical music 24-7. Listen online or with an HD radio.

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch announces that the grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson on any of five counts that were presented to it.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updated at 4:45 p.m. Tuesday, May 5 with dismissal from federal court.

A federal judge has ruled  that a grand juror who wants to speak out about the experiences of evaluating the evidence in the Michael Brown shooting should bring that case in state court.

Connie Chapman, who worked at the Sac-Osage Hospital in Osceola, Mo.,for 40 years, looks over a nearly empty room in the hospital.
Todd Feeback|Heartland Health Monitor

Chris Smiley spent most of Tuesday moving the last of the boxes out of Sac Osage Hospital in rural Osceola, MO. In the months after the small town’s only hospital closed for good, the facility’s CEO has been selling off supplies and making arrangements to transition her patients’ care to other places. The building itself is set to be demolished.

“We arranged to have another facility take over our clinic,” Smiley said. “There will be ambulance service in the community. There’s a heli-pad that will be maintained by the ambulance bay.”

Nixon vetoes bill limiting unemployment benefits

22 hours ago
help wanted job listing
neetalparekh | Flickr

Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed his second bill of the session on Tuesday. 

This bill, House Bill 150, ties unemployment benefits to the state's jobless rate and would have cut the number of weeks someone could receive benefits to 13 weeks when the jobless rate dips below 6 percent.

Joining host Don Marsh were (from L to R) Vanessa Cooksey, Jason Purnell and Yemi Akande-Bartsch
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

For the Sake of All” is an interdisciplinary project addressing the health and well-being of African Americans in St. Louis and St. Louis County that began in 2013. A collaboration of Washington University and Saint Louis University, the project issued five policy briefs illuminating major areas of concern. The first phase culminated in May 2014 with a final report outlining six recommendations.

ontbonne University professor Jack Luzkow joined host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Jack Luzkow, professor of history at Fontbonne University, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to share details about his book “The Great Forgetting: The Past, Present and Future of Social Democracy and the Welfare State.”

In the book, Luzkow mentioned an array of social issues including the distribution of wealth, taxing the ‘1 percent’, health care, and more.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A Missouri appeals court has upheld the 2011 firing of the city’s former corrections commissioner, Eugene Stubblefield.

The Eastern District of the Missouri Court of Appeals affirmed the July 16, 2014, opinion of Judge Robert Dierker without making its reasoning public. Dierker had ruled there was plenty of evidence that the city of St. Louis had just cause to let Stubblefield go.

Dianne White, as she was professionally known, at work at KSDK
St. Louis Media History Foundation

As the tumultuous ’60s descended upon the nation, Dianne White Clatto emerged unwittingly and unceremoniously as St. Louis’ own embodiment of civil rights history.

Updated 4:01 p.m. May 5 - Missouri lawmakers have successfully overridden Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of legislation to reduce lifetime eligibility for welfare recipients.

Voting booths
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

Updated 3:25 p.m. May 4 - Former Kinloch Mayor Darren Small, who lost on April 7, has filed a court petition that contests the election and alleges vote fraud.  The winning candidate, Betty McCray, is threatening legal action if she isn't soon allowed to get into City Hall.

Small's petition was filed in St. Louis Circuit Court last week, soon after the county Election Board presented the results of its house-to-house survey with county Prosecutor Bob McCulloch.

Geologists from the University of Wisconsin extrude a 6-meter sediment core from the deepest point of Horseshoe Lake.
Sam Munoz | University of Wisconsin

The people who built and lived among the tall, sculpted mounds now preserved at Cahokia Mounds Historic Site have long presented a mystery to archeologists.

One of the biggest mysteries: Why did they leave?

A team of geographers studying pollen deposits buried in the sediment under Horseshoe Lake may have stumbled upon new evidence that helps explain Cahokia’s decline.  

The answers are in the lake butter

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