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Parishioners pray during a Sunday morning Mass at Our Lady of Guadalupe in Ferguson on Nov. 19, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The power of prayer: Among the St. Louis faithful, many say they’d be lost without it

In this week when many St. Louisans and others around the country gather for the Thanksgiving holiday, before they dive into the turkey and pumpkin pie, they will pray.

But why? Why does prayer remain so important to many people at a time when, according to the Pew Research Center, the number of U.S. adults who do not identify with any organized religion is growing ?

It’s mostly because prayer is a given for people who follow almost any faith tradition, according to Shane Sharp, an associate professor of sociology at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.

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Flo Groberg was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2015 and is the author of the new book, "8 Seconds of Courage."
(Courtesy of the publisher)

Host Don Marsh talked with retired U.S. Army Captain Florent “Flo” Groberg, a recipient of the Medal of Honor and author of the new book, “8 Seconds of Courage: A Soldier’s Story from Immigrant to the Medal of Honor.”

The discussion was recorded on Tuesday, November 21 in the Community Room at UMSL at Grand Center, the home of St. Louis Public Radio and will air on Friday, November 24 at noon and 10 p.m.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with author and Washington University professor Mary Jo Bang about her work and new poetry collection, “A Doll for Throwing.”

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Often times, when a person passes away, their story dies with them. But a local non-profit organization hopes to keep those memories alive. 

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about The Grannie Annie Family Story Celebration and the role it plays in encouraging young people to preserve their families' stories.

The organization helps children discover, write and share stories from their family's history, and then publishes illustrated collections of their work.

Facebook is facing tough questions in the wake of the 2016 presidential election. Did Russians use social media to sway the election? Why is there so much fake news? Why isn’t Facebook more transparent?

It’s a familiar story in rural America. Four years ago the Pemiscot County hospital, the lone public hospital in Missouri’s poorest county, nearly closed. What’s keeping it in business today has also become increasingly common in rural healthcare: relationships with a handful of local pharmacies.


Two blue faces framed by jagged wood pieces rest on a bed of brick laid across a pedistal.
Provided by St. Louis Lambert International Airport

Holiday travelers will have a chance to see new art at the St. Louis Lambert International Airport this week.

At a time when many likely view the city as divided divided along political, economic and social lines, the exhibit in Terminal 1 aims to draw attention to the camaraderie and collaborative spirit that dominate the city’s art scene.

Updated at 8 a.m. ET

After a 5 1/2-year trial, the former Bosnian Serb military commander blamed for orchestrating the murders of thousands of ethnic Muslims has learned his own fate.

Frankie Freeman, family, and bronze statue. November 2017.
Kae M. Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

More than half a century ago, civil rights attorney Frankie Muse Freeman became the first woman appointed to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. At that point, she’d already opened her own private legal practice and helped end legal segregation of public housing in St. Louis.

Since that momentous day in 1964, she has continued to fight for civil and human rights. At 100, she’s still active in civic affairs.

On Tuesday, the St. Louis City chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People dedicated a bronze statue in her honor at Broadway and Chestnut Street, near the Old Courthouse.

Sikeston farmer Trey Wilson said he saw substantial damage to his soybean crops this year. On the left is what a healthy soybean plant looks like; on the right is a soybean plant showing signs of dicamba damage.
Trey Wilson

Next June, growers in several counties located in Missouri's bootheel region will no longer be allowed to spray Engenia, BASF's dicamba-based pesticide.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture announced Friday that it would ban the pesticide to protect farmers whose crops are vulnerable to damage from dicamba. The herbicide, intended to kill a notorious weed called pigweed, can be difficult to control.

State regulators and growers associations are trying to support farmers who use the herbicide on dicamba- resistant crops while also protecting farmers who don't use dicamba-resistent seeds.

Melanie Adams (L) and Amanda Doyle (R) are the authors of the new book, "Standing Up for Civil Rights in St. Louis."
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

A new book designed for upper elementary students shares the stories of ordinary men and women in St. Louis who fought for equal rights.

Amanda Doyle and Melanie Adams are the authors of “Standing Up for Civil Rights in St. Louis,” a publication of the Missouri History Museum Press.

“I really look at this book as our opportunity to educate the next generation on civil rights history,” Adams said.

Adams previously worked at the Missouri History Museum though now works for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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St. Louis on the Air

Medal of Honor recipient and retired U.S. Army Capt. Flo Groberg

In a discussion recorded before a live audience, host Don Marsh talks with retired Capt. Floberg about his new book, "8 Seconds of Courage: A Soldier’s Story from Immigrant to the Medal of Honor."

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