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This painting of an officer and an artist wearing a "Hands Up, Don't Shoot" shirt, by Solomon Thurman, shows the thin line between police and protesters, according to gallerist Freida Wheaton.
Solomon Thurman

How the broad brush of Ferguson transformed the local arts scene

In a single moment and with a half-dozen gunshots, St. Louis was shaken to the core on Aug. 9. The shooting death of Michael Brown by Ferguson police office Darren Wilson unleashed continuous waves of local and national protest that significantly shifted the St. Louis arts scene. Since then, musicians, dancers, and visual, performing and literary artists have sung and performed, and written and painted the issues revealed by the tragedy.
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This photograph was published in the Kansas City Star. Jamell Spann, center, at a protest following the Aug. 9, 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown. Elizabeth Vega, right, and several of his friends try to comfort him.
Associated Press photo as published online by the Kansas City Star.

StoryCorps: One photo reunites two Ferguson protesters

Following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson on Aug. 9, 2014, the world watched the aftermath of the shooting and the subsequent demonstrations and police actions through news coverage, including many stirring photographs. One of those photos was taken by St. Louis Post Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen. It was part of a portfolio of work that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography. The picture shows a young man, body tensed in anguish, his face in a scream of sorrow, anger, frustration and fear. He is surrounded by other young people and one adult woman, her face grimaced with sadness, her hand on his shoulder in an attempt to comfort him.
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St. Louis on the Air

Today: Brewing—Anheuser-Busch and beyond

Everyone knows St. Louis is a beer city as much as a river city or Gateway city or 1904 World’s Fair city. But few know the full history of brewing in St. Louis.

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Ernst Zinner
Provided by the family

Ernst K. Zinner, an astrophysicist who spent a distinguished and game-changing career at Washington University -- who, in fact, discovered fossils older than the solar system -- died Thursday, July 30, of complications of mantle cell lymphoma. He was 78 and lived in University City.

Mr. Zinner's interests, his career, the objects of his research, along with his stunning accomplishments, were infinite, as deep and profound as space, aspects of which he knew so well. Although personally modest, his dedication to science was renowned. Colleagues held him in esteem as a brilliant scientist and a nurturing mentor, and as a warm and generous friend.

Felicia Shaw, new executive director of St. Louis' Regional Arts Commission, said she had a sense that this community would now "be open to change" after the events of Ferguson.
Nancy Fowler

When new Regional Arts Commission (RAC) executive director Felicia Shaw realized her job at a San Diego foundation might be eliminated, she wondered what that might mean for her life.

“I was thinking about what new direction I wanted to go in,” Shaw said. “And then, Ferguson happened.”

Hear more from Felicia Shaw on "St. Louis on the Air" with Don Marsh, today from noon to 1 p.m. Here's a preview of what she has to say about the impact of Ferguson on the arts, and how technology is changing the way we see art.

Embarrassment, sadness, anger and guilt

Last August, a Shaw listened to the news coming from her hometown of St. Louis, she went through a gamut of emotions: embarrassment, sadness, anger and guilt. What she heard loud and clear were the very same issues that drove her to move San Diego — more than three decades earlier.

Former Cass County Prosecutor Teresa Hensley
Courtesy of Hensley's Twitter page

When Scott Sifton bowed out of the attorney general’s race last week, Democrats appeared to avoid a resource-draining primary battle between the Affton state senator and St. Louis County Assessor Jake Zimmerman. 

Well, at least for a few hours.

Before the preverbal ink (or, in this site’s case, pixels) dried on Sifton’s departure from the 2016 statewide scene, former Cass County Teresa Hensley announced she would enter the Democratic scramble for attorney. It showed that if the goal of getting Sifton out of the attorney general’s race was to avoid a primary, that plan didn’t really succeed.

Scott Sifton
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week’s edition of Politically Speaking, state Sen. Scott Sifton joins St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies to talk about his decision to scuttle his attorney general bid.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

A coalition of activist groups is planning a series of events this week to commemorate the first anniversary of Michael Brown Jr.’s fatal police shooting on Aug. 9, 2014.

Nearly a dozen groups are participating in the so-called “United We Fight” activities that begin Friday morning and culminate with a day of civil disobedience on Monday. 

Dr. Anupam Agarwal, (with microphone), responds to a patient advocate during a roundtable discussion in St. Louis. She serves as acting chief of staff for the St. Louis VA health system.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Regional officials from the health and benefits system that serves veterans crowed over the gains they’ve made in the past few years. On the other side of a room at Soldier's Memorial Monday, members of veteran’s organizations brought up their clients’ latest challenges, but said the conditions have noticeably improved.

The discussion was part of a roundtable meeting that touched on issues related to each of the three branches of the Veterans Administration: the Veterans Health Administration, the Veterans Benefits Administration and the Cemetery Administration.  

SIU System president Randy Dunn
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Southern Illinois University System president Randy Dunn has now completed his first year in that role. As part of the “St. Louis on the Air” series on regional colleges and universities, host Don Marsh talked with Dunn on Monday about his first year as president and the challenges faced by institutions of higher learning.

Tear gas was used in Ferguson. Nov. 24 2014
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

A year after Michael Brown's death, Ferguson and the issues raised there continue to resonate far beyond St. Louis. In addition to our own reporting, we've compiled links here to some of the one-year anniversary coverage by others that you might find particularly interesting.

Provided by candidate

Amid their hunt for a bunch of statewide candidates, Missouri Democrats now have at least one well-known contender for secretary of state:  former KMOV reporter Robin Smith.

Smith, who just retired from her 40-year TV career, announced Sunday that she plans to run for the statewide post — which will be open in the 2016 election because Democratic incumbent Jason Kander for running for the U.S. Senate.

Ferguson Historical Society

The photo is an iconic image of post-World War II America: A bustling downtown main street lined with sturdy Chevys, Fords and Chryslers. Pedestrians strolling past a hodgepodge of storefronts with flashy light-up signs: Barbays Self-Service Market, King Drugs, Florsheim shoes, Coca Cola.

 

This was Ferguson, Mo., in the late 1950s, just past the midpoint of its 120-year history.

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The Listening Project: Why is it hard to find affordable housing?

Chris Krehmeyer of Beyond Housing explains that few new units are built and roadblocks can trip up those looking