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Nixon urged to sign school bill, provide more choice to students

Even though it doesn’t make changes in student transfers that could save Normandy from bankruptcy, several education groups urged Gov. Jay Nixon Wednesday to sign the school bill approved by the Missouri legislature because it expands options for students in failing schools. “Over the past few years, Missourians have demanded a solution to the student transfer issue,” said Ryan Stauffer, outreach director for StudentsFirst in Missouri. “This year, legislative leaders in both chambers...
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St. Louis on the Air

Today: 'The Blue Line'

“St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh talked to Terrell Carter, a former St. Louis City police officer about racial division in St. Louis.

We Live Here

The life and times of a police officer.

In this week's podcast, we explore the police perspective. From what it's like on the day-to-day beat to coping with racism within police departments.

Community Engagement

The Listening Project: What's the best way to build up communities?

At North Side Community School, family members discuss how they're investing in improving the Fairgrounds neighborhood.

Foodie News

Gerard Craft throws a pizza crust at Pastaria
Greg Rannells

STL chef Gerard Craft savors James Beard Award as expansion plans move forward

Local restaurateur Gerard Craft has long been a bridesmaid in the pursuit of a coveted James Beard Award. Now he’s the bride. After six years as a nominee, Craft won the "Best Chef: Midwest" award in a Monday night gala in Chicago. The honor comes as Craft, 35, and his restaurant company are already eyeing expanding here in St. Louis and beyond. With four local eateries under his belt, a fifth in the works, and plans to debut several out-of-town establishments, the award is just the cherry on...
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Paul McKee
St. Louis Public Radio

PNC Bank files federal suit against McKee

Paul McKee’s legal woes are growing. PNC Bank filed a federal lawsuit late last week in the Southern District of Illinois. It claims McKee, several of his holding companies and the former Corn Belt Bank & Trust defaulted on an $8 million loan from a PNC predecessor.
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Classical 90.7 KWMU-3

Classical music 24-7. Listen online or with an HD radio.

A new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis shows a growing link between education and wealth accumulation and income levels.
(via Flickr/Tracy O)

A new study from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis finds families with higher levels of education attain more wealth, and that the wealth gap between educational attainment levels is growing.

Updated 5 p.m., May 6 by Jo Mannies -- Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon had harsh words for the General Assembly’s action to override his veto of a bill that shortens the period for low-income families to receive welfare benefits. The bill also imposes new work requirements.

During a stop in St. Louis, the governor said he didn't object to changing the work requirements. But he did object to the way it was done, which his administration says will result in about 6,500 children getting knocked off the state's welfare rolls.

"You don't move the state forward by taking benefits away from 6,500 kids,'' Nixon said. He explained that there were ways, such as a "protected payee program" that would have penalized the parents, but not the children.

"What did a five-year-old do wrong?" he asked. "There were a lot of ways where kids didn't have to suffer here."
 

Updated 4:01 p.m. May 5 - Missouri lawmakers have successfully overridden Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of legislation to reduce lifetime eligibility for welfare recipients.

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, north city
(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio)

A group of residents is asking the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to cross north St. Louis off of a list of four sites the agency is considering for its relocation.

The residents delivered a petition with more than 95,000 signatures to the NGA on Wednesday with the help of the Institute for Justice, an organization based in Arlington, VA, and local group Save North Side STL.

A farm pond in southern Illinois
Deb Rednour

Sometime in the next several weeks, the Obama administration is expected to put in place an administrative rule defining the scope of the Clean Water Act and federal government’s regulatory reach to so-called “waters of the United States.” The rule will specify just how far the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corp of Engineers may go in asserting jurisdiction over waters across the U.S. to enforce the act.

Connie Chapman, who worked at the Sac-Osage Hospital in Osceola, Mo.,for 40 years, looks over a nearly empty room in the hospital.
Todd Feeback|Heartland Health Monitor

Chris Smiley spent most of Tuesday moving the last of the boxes out of Sac Osage Hospital in rural Osceola, MO. In the months after the small town’s only hospital closed for good, the facility’s CEO has been selling off supplies and making arrangements to transition her patients’ care to other places. The building itself is set to be demolished.

“We arranged to have another facility take over our clinic,” Smiley said. “There will be ambulance service in the community. There’s a heli-pad that will be maintained by the ambulance bay.”

(via Flickr/frankjuarez)

For the second year in a row, Missouri lawmakers have sent a proposed fix to the state's student transfer law to Gov. Jay Nixon.

Federal judge says grand juror argument against secrecy belongs in state court

May 5, 2015
St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch announces that the grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson on any of five counts that were presented to it.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updated 4:45 p.m. May 5 with dismissal from federal court. A federal judge has ruled  that a grand juror who wants to speak out about the experiences of evaluating the evidence in the Michael Brown shooting should bring that case in state court.

(via Google Maps screen capture)

As problems with student learning persist in the Normandy school district, and lawmakers in Jefferson City appear to oppose a cap on tuition paid for student transfers, the vice president of the Missouri state board of education said the end of the district could be close.

help wanted job listing
neetalparekh | Flickr

Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed his second bill of the session on Tuesday. 

This bill, House Bill 150, ties unemployment benefits to the state's jobless rate and would have cut the number of weeks someone could receive benefits to 13 weeks when the jobless rate dips below 6 percent.

Joining host Don Marsh were (from L to R) Vanessa Cooksey, Jason Purnell and Yemi Akande-Bartsch
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

For the Sake of All” is an interdisciplinary project addressing the health and well-being of African Americans in St. Louis and St. Louis County that began in 2013. A collaboration of Washington University and Saint Louis University, the project issued five policy briefs illuminating major areas of concern. The first phase culminated in May 2014 with a final report outlining six recommendations.

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