St. Louis Public Radio

Top Stories

Two men confront a crowd of demonstrators during a protest Friday night in St. Charles. It was the eighth day of protests following the not-guilty verdict of white ex-St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on first-degree murder charges.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Protesters go to mostly white St. Charles to deplore Stockley verdict, call for freedom

One week after a judge acquitted former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley of murder in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith, protesters continued their push for change, taking their message Friday to the mostly white city of St. Charles.

Read More
Angus Kingston | Flickr

A cybersecurity initiative launched two years ago to protect public schools in Missouri from hackers is getting good marks from educators. 

It was launched in September 2015 by State Auditor Nicole Galloway and has become a permanent part of the auditor's office's practices.

Alison Dreith, one of two women who are suing the city of St. Louis over the way it is policing protests, is helped by an unidentified man after she was hit with pepper spray during a protest on Sept. 15, 2017.
Zach Stafford

 

The ACLU of Missouri has sued the city of St. Louis for the way police have handled protests following a judge’s decision to acquit a white former St. Louis police officer of murder in the 2011 shooting death of a black man.

The federal civil rights lawsuit filed Friday accuses the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department of violating protesters’ rights to free speech, due process, and the right to be free from unlawful arrests. The suit asks a judge to order the department to police the protests constitutionally.

Students get ready for a violin class taught by Philip Tinge at Sister Thea Bowman Catholic School in East St. Louis.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Sister Thea Bowman Catholic School in East St. Louis is one of hundreds of private schools in Illinois that could see a financial boost from the state’s new tax credit scholarship program.

More than 90 percent of the families who send their children to the school fall below the federal poverty line of $24,600 for a family of four. That gives them top priority to receive a scholarship.

Although children from low-income families get priority,  if Illinois follows the pattern of other states with similar programs, most of the tax credit scholarships will go to middle-class families.

Carla has started taking classes, hoping to make her children proud by becoming fluent in English over the next few years. St. Louis Public Radio has changed Carla’s name because she is an unauthorized immigrant. May 2017.
Jenny Simeone-Cases | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Republicans have jumped behind the latest proposal in Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

A Senate bill would gut protections for people with pre-existing conditions and redistribute health care spending in the form of block grants to states. States like Missouri, which did not expand Medicaid coverage to low-income people under the 2010 health law, would see a boost in funding; states like Illinois could lose hundreds of million dollars a year.

Sherman Alexie, a Spokane-Coeur d'Alene-American novelist, short story writer, poet, and keynote speaker of BookFest St. Louis joined St. Louis on the Air on Friday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Sherman Alexie, acclaimed novelist, memoirist, poet and filmmaker, joined St. Louis on the Air on Friday. The author is keynoting the inaugural BookFest St. Louis, which will take place in the Central West End this weekend.

Alexie is also in the midst of promoting his recent memoir, “You Don't Have to Say You Love Me,” which was published earlier this year.

Alderman John Collins-Muhammad, D-21st Ward, speaks as Anthony Lamar Smith's parents, Annie Smith and Darvell Smith Sr., look on.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

As protests continue over the acquittal of former police officer Jason Stockley of first-degree murder, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen is honoring the man he shot and killed: Anthony Lamar Smith.

The Board’s actions on Friday came as St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson is embracing the Ferguson Commission report, a collection of dozens of policy recommendations that was laid out after the 2014 death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, as the way forward.

Protesters sit at the intersection of Maryland and Euclid for a moment of silence on Friday night.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Throughout the week, St. Louis on the Air has been hearing from listeners about their thoughts on the Stockley verdict and protests following it. Many have expressed disagreement with the verdict, but we’ve also heard from those who agreed with the verdict or who disagree with protesters’ tactics.

Nick Pistor will join St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh for a live recording at Left Bank Books on Sept. 27, discussing his book "Shooting Lincoln."
Left Bank Books

Join St. Louis on the Air for a live recording on Wednesday, Sept. 27 at 7 p.m. at Left Bank Books in the Central West End. Host Don Marsh will be joined in discussion by former St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter Nick Pistor, who recently published “Shooting Lincoln: Mathew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and the Race to Photograph the Story of the Century.

Protesters square off with police officers at the gates of Busch Stadium Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017 during a concert. They were protesting the acquittal of a former St. Louis police officer on murder charges.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 9:40 p.m. with additional details — Hundreds of “white allies” marched in the streets downtown on Thursday. Their aim was to demonstrate broad support for the protest movement sparked by a judge’s decision to acquit a former police officer of murder.

For more about 90 minutes, a crowd of predominantly white demonstrators expressed solidarity with African-Americans. For the past week, many have protested St. Louis Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson’s decision to find Jason Stockley, who is white, not guilty of murder in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man.

Panelists at Harris-Stowe University discuss racial inequality on Sept. 21, 2017.
Chelsea Hoye | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

As the St. Louis region manages the ongoing unrest sparked by a judge’s decision to acquit a white former police officer in the death of a black man, civil rights activists say it’s past time for the city to address the policies that have long kept black people behind.

St. Louis must put an end to systemic racism if conditions are to improve for African-Americans, community leaders said Thursday during a panel discussion at Harris-Stowe University.

“Education is freedom; it allows you choices,” state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed said. “It allows you to go to the next level.”

Pages

The St. Louis Symphony Orchstra returns to the air tonight at eight

David Robertson conducts an all Mozart program featuring pianist Emanuel Ax in Concertos Nos. 19 and 27.

Public Insight Network

Help inform our coverage

Become part of our Public Insight Network. We use the PIN to get insight from people like you. Today's question: What questions or concerns do you have about the Stockley protests?

An in-depth look at publicly funded, independent schools in Missouri