Top Stories

Dentists write 10 percent of prescriptions for antibiotic courses in the U.S., according to research by the CDC.
Flickr, via Aiko, Thomas & Juliette+Isaac

To curb antibiotic use, researchers study an unlikely prescriber: dentists

Research underway at Washington University seeks to reduce antibiotic use by focusing on a prescriber who doesn’t get too much attention: your local dentist. Over time, the widespread use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture has led to the evolution of bacteria that are resistant to many modern medicines. This past spring, U.S. scientists discovered in the urine of a patient in Pennsylvania a strain of E. coli resistant to all antibiotics currently available. A big part of slowing down...
Read More
East-West Gateway Council of Governments

St. Louis County will be chipping in to study a possible light rail expansion that would run south from Ferguson through downtown St. Louis to the Meramec River.

Jenny Simeone | St. Louis Public Radio

Community activists draped banners over several overpasses over westbound Interstate 70 on Wednesday to call attention to neglected parts of St. Louis and protest police killings of black people.

Each banner greeted commuters heading into St. Louis County with messages like “Black Lives Matter,” “Police Stop Killing Us” and “Invest in North City.” Kayla Reed, one of the organizers with the St. Louis Action Council, says they chose I-70 because it allows drivers to pass quickly through areas with high rates of unemployment, infant mortality, and crime.

A previous exhibition by artist Joan Hall at Bruno David Gallery
Bruno David Gallery

Bruno David Gallery in Grand Center has closed its doors.

Bruno David said his namesake art gallery shut down because of structural concerns recently discovered in its Washington Boulevard building. The issues came to light during an engineering survey.

All upcoming exhibitions are canceled while David looks for a new location.

Judge Rex Burlison (center) listens to attorneys on the first day of a trial to determine if there will be a new election in the 78th House District.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

On Aug. 5, 2016, incumbent state Rep. Penny Hubbard, D-78th District, beat challenger Bruce Franks by 90 votes. Her entire margin of victory came from absentee ballots.

Franks and his attorney, Dave Roland, sued in an an effort to force a new election, arguing that irregularities in the absentee ballots made the results invalid.

Did you know there are over 250 varieties of garlic?
Photography-S! | Flickr

In Mark Brown’s mind, garlic is a “uniter” of people.

“Not everyone eats pork. Not everyone eats wheat or zucchini … but wherever you come from, your people, they eat garlic,” said the proprietor of Gateway Garlic Farms and the founder of St. Louis Garlic Fest, happening on Sept. 4.

Provided by the Great Rivers Law Center

A group of Franklin County residents has appealed a county decision to allow a concrete plant to be built near the Shaw Nature Reserve. 

Three years ago, Kirkwood-based concrete company Landvatter Ready Mix applied for a conditional use permit to build its third concrete facility in the state. After the Franklin County Board of Adjustment approved the permit, residents sued county officials, hoping to overturn the decision. Months later, the company withdrew its permit application and asked the county to rezone the land parcel for commercial use. The county's Planning and Zoning Commission granted its request last September.

The Climate Corporation Logo
Provided by The Climate Corporation

The sale of a Monsanto unit's high-speed planting technology subsidiary is in jeopardy. The federal government has gone to court to block the deal. It contends the multi-million dollar sale would hinder competition and raise costs for farmers. The companies involved in the potential transaction are vowing to fight the claims.

"The Jarmo" from Nathaniel Reed Bakery in Kirkwood.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine is back and ready to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants in September.

Catherine Klene and Meera Nagarajan, the magazine’s managing editor and art director, respectively, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss the openings and closings of restaurants you should know.

A kit containing the opioid overdose antidote naloxone.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio | file photo

Updated at 12:31 p.m. Aug. 31 with information from Schnucks — According to a spokesperson with the state department that oversees the Missouri Board of Pharmacy, Missouri pharmacies do not have to wait for final rules from the board before distributing the opioid overdose antidote naloxone without a prescription.

“The new provisions are ‘self-executing’ and do not require a Board rule for implementation.  This means pharmacists with a valid protocol are authorized to dispense naloxone, as of [Aug. 28, 2016],” said Yaryna Klimchak with the Missouri Department of Insurance, Financial Institutions & Professional Registration.

Daniel Gallagher holds up a sign outside of the St. Louis County Administrative Building in Clayton. Gallagher says he opposes a bill raising the age to purchasing tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, to 21.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County is closer to boosting the age to purchase tobacco products from 18 to 21.

The St. Louis County Council gave initial approval to Councilman Sam Page’s bill that would implement the 21 and older requirement. It would affect traditional tobacco products like cigarettes or cigars and electronic cigarettes.

Pages

Support STLPR with a Vehicle Donation

St. Louis on the Air

Thursday: Why protest? A look at the history of social movements in the U.S.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, we will discuss the history and nature of protests with two experts – Professor Sunita Parikh of Washington University and T.V. Reed, author of “The Art of Protest.

Curious about your environment?

What questions do you have about environmental changes where you live?

Our environment and science reporter, Eli Chen, wants to know.

Public Insight Network

Help inform our coverage

Become part of our Public Insight Network. We use the PIN to get insight from people like you. Today's question: Do you drive for Uber?