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Students with the Throwing and Growing Foundation take a tour of Good Life Growing in the Vandeventer neighborhood.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Green spaces may breathe new life into north St. Louis but residents need to be on board

Lonza Patrick has lived in the Walnut Park East neighborhood for more than 50 years. He’s seen the area take repeated turns for the worse, as nearby properties became vacant and neglected. “Oh man, have I had experiences,” Patrick said. Patrick wants to see the neighborhood improve and it might, with the unrolling of a new initiative to demolish vacant properties to build green spaces. It’s headed by the Green City Coalition, which consists of the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Missouri Botannical Garden and several other St. Louis-based nonprofits. The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District provided funding to the coalition this year to knock down about 1,000 derelict, Land Reutilization Authority-owned buildings in the Walnut Park East, Baden and Wells Goodfellow neighborhoods.

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provided | Elizabeth Wiseman Photography

Brazen Global has been helping women entrepreneurs in St. Louis grow their businesses for the past four years. The group announced Tuesday it’s taking its membership organization for “growth-seeking” women business owners to six more startup cities around the country including: Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Fort Worth, and Philadelphia.

 

"We are a startup serving startups,” said Jennifer Ehlen, Brazen Global CEO and president. “Our journey is very similar to the very women entrepreneurs we seek to support.”

 

The Missouri Sierra Club and its supporters gathered in front of Ameren Missouri's headquarters in St. Louis in April 2018 to protest against proposed regulations that could weaken oversight of coal ash waste.
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

As environmentalists voiced concerns in Washington about possible changes to the Environmental Protection Agency's rules on disposing coal ash waste, some in Missouri chose to express their opposition by staging a protest at a major utility corporation's doorstep. 

The Missouri chapter of the Sierra Club gathered a small band of supporters Tuesday at Ameren Missouri's headquarters in St. Louis. They held large signs that showed images of Ameren's four power plants in Missouri and listed details about the toxic heavy metals that coal ash contains, such as arsenic.

Ameren Missouri announced recently that it plans to close all of its coal ash ponds by 2022. However, activists want the regulators to address the contamination the ponds have already caused and are unhappy that Ameren has chosen to close its ponds by leaving them in place.

The Supreme Court of Missouri
Flickr | david_shane

The Missouri Supreme Court on Wednesday will consider two cases that could have far-reaching implications for the civil rights protections granted to the state’s LGBTQ community.

The judges will be asked to determine whether the Missouri Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, even though the words are not in the act itself. Lower courts are split on the issue.

Left Bank Books

On Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air, we aired host Don Marsh's conversation with St. Louis-based journalist and author Sarah Kendzior that was recorded April 17 at Left Bank Books.

Kendzior is the author of “The View from Flyover Country: Dispatches from the Forgotten America.”

Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner during her oath ceremony on January 6, 2017.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5:15 p.m. with Judge Rex Burlison taking request under advisement.

Attorneys for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens want to disqualify St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner from overseeing the governor’s latest felony charge — and instead appoint a special prosecutor.

It stems from how Gardner has handled Greitens’ other felony case for felony invasion of privacy.

Angela Lewis, left, listens while realtor Gail Brown explains how she arrived at a list price for the Lewis property in north St. Louis, in April 2018.
Holly Edgell / St. Louis Public Radio

Advocates concerned about persistent housing segregation in the region might question why promotional materials for the 2018 Fair Housing Conference use the word "celebrate" in reference to the Fair Housing Act.

"The reality is the racial segregation that we see everywhere in this country is the product of very explicit design by the federal state and local governments, intended to segregate the nation by race," said Richard Rothstein, ahead of Wednesday's meeting.

Rothstein, the keynote speaker, is the author of "The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America."

File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is still getting support from some legislators, despite being charged on Friday with illegally obtaining a list of donors from a charity he founded years ago.

Rep. Diane Franklin, R-Camdenton, who represents portions of Fort Leonard Wood and the Lake of the Ozarks area, said the people she’s talked to in her district think Greitens is doing a good job as governor.

Local residents (from left) Heather Silverman, Jami Dolby and Kara Wurtz recently ran for city council seats in Creve Coeur, Chesterfield and Kirkwood, respectively.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

“Last year I marched, but this year I run,” Kara Wurtz told her friends and family this past January 21, the day she launched her campaign as a city council candidate in Kirkwood, Missouri. She’s among an increasing number of women getting involved in politics all across the country and the region.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Wurtz and two other women who recently ran for their respective city councils in Chesterfield, Creve Coeur and Kirkwood, Missouri, about what prompted their candidacies and how they hope to engage in their local communities going forward.

Gov. Eric Greitens' defense team outside the Carnahan Courthouse in downtown St. Louis following a hearing. March 26, 2018.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

An investigator who interviewed several witnesses in Gov. Eric Greitens' invasion of privacy case will have to show up to be re-deposed on Thursday.

A judge also ruled that an attorney who represents a key figure in the case can't also be that investigator's attorney.

Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

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St. Louis on the Air

Wednesday: How the budget woes of public universities are impacting students

Host Don Marsh will discuss the impact of higher education's ongoing budget crisis on those at the center of the whole endeavor.

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