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Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

African-American Union Army soldiers died on their way home from war; then history lost their names

The elm and oak trees have grown tall with age in Section 57 of Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in south St. Louis County. It’s a quiet place, where songbirds rule the peace from the branches above. Amid the white marble tombstones, row on row, stands one stone obelisk from another era. It marks the final resting place of African-American Civil War soldiers from Missouri who died from cholera in August 1866, as they made their way home from the war. The soldiers were buried as Unknowns,...
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Cityscape

Authentic Chinese lanterns to light up St. Louis once again

The Chinese Lantern Festival returns to the Missouri Botanical Garden for the first time since 2012. Check out our behind the scenes photos and an audio tour.

We Live Here

We Live Here: Do you have a right to a public defender? Maybe

You have to be really poor and accused of a serious crime to qualify. Public defender Janise Lampley explains why her job is hectic but rewarding.

Arts and culture

A section of the Katy Trail in St. Charles, MO.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Celebrating 25 years: snapshots from the Katy Trail

The longest Rails-to-Trails project in the country, and Missouri's "skinniest state park" turns 25 years old this year. After weathering floods, storms and even a tornado, the 240-mile long Katy Trail attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors annually.
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Gov. Jay Nixon says there's a distinctioGov. Jay Nixon says there's a distinction between a gas tax increase and "trying to get some sort n between a gas tax increase and as being different "than trying to get some sort of generalized additional revenue."
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On the Trail: 'Jay won't raise taxes' pledge resurfaces during road funding debate

There are some absolutes in electoral politics: Babies will get kissed. Hands will get shook. And politicians will promise not to raise taxes. While we don’t know the exact quantity of kissed babies or shaken hands during the 2008 campaign governor, it is clear that all three major candidates in the 2008 race for governor made solemn declarations against tax hikes. Former state Treasurer Sarah Steelman swore “there will be no new taxes in a Steelman administration.” And the eventual GOP...
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Classical Music

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Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri’s General Assembly adjourned this month without addressing a projected budget shortfall that transportation officials say will devastate the state’s roads and bridges over the next few years. Despite widespread agreement that Missouri’s Department of Transportation is in dire need of new funding to maintain the nation’s seventh largest highway system, getting state lawmakers to agree on how to pay for it – be it through increasing the sales tax, fuel tax, or cutting other state services – is now the biggest challenge.

Shutting Down Services

Gov. Jay Nixon says there's a distinctioGov. Jay Nixon says there's a distinction between a gas tax increase and "trying to get some sort n between a gas tax increase and as being different "than trying to get some sort of generalized additional revenue."
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

There are some absolutes in electoral politics: Babies will get kissed. Hands will get shook. And politicians will promise not to raise taxes.

Cleopatra, left, and Antony, second from right, battle Rome and, at times, each other.
Provided by Shakespeare Festival St. Louis

The evening was crisp. Chairs and blankets were spread out as feasts appeared from baskets. On one hill, Juggling Jeff escaped from a straightjacket. On another, young players trod literal boards previewing what was to come. And in the second act was a tribute to a heroine and the performing arts in St. Louis in the summer: “Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale Her infinite variety.”

James Cridland via Flickr

The St. Louis regional economy would see an increase of almost $14 billion if income were equal across racial lines. That’s according to a new report published by the Public Policy Research Center at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

“That’s the kind of money that turns over in the economy to the degree that it translates into increases in property values and translates into increases available for education. There are just all kinds of implications for that level of change,” said Mark Tranel, the director of the Public Policy Research Center.

About 70 people protested against Monsanto outside the Missouri Botanical Garden Saturday, May 23, 2015. They want the garden to stop accepting money from the agri-business company.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Botanical Garden visitors were greeted by flashes of color even before they saw Chinese lantern displays Saturday morning. About 70 anti-Monsanto protesters lined the sidewalks outside the garden, some carrying 3-D monarch butterfly props. One protester brought along a dog in a bee costume.

“We find it really hypocritical that a garden, which is by the way a beautiful garden, and that has in its mission to promote sustainability, is receiving large amounts of funds from an herbicide producer,” protest organizer Aubrey Yarbrough explained. Yarbrough is an organic farmer with GMO Free Midwest.

May 2015 graduates. Front row from left to right: Sean Marks, Cory Chandler, Prince Farris-Settles, Alvin Love, Michael Harris (red shirt). Back row from left to right: Matt Hermeyer (white shirt), Paul Oryem, Sean Kempf, Joel Smith, Stacey Robinson.
Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is awarding St. Louis Community College just over $190 thousand to continue its environmental job training program.

This is the fifth time that the college has received an EPA grant since 2000.

The Environmental Remediation Job Training program is a collaboration between St. Louis Community College and Saint Louis University. The community college recruits and selects the participants and helps connect graduates with potential employers; SLU provides the classroom facilities and conducts the training.

Show-Me Cannabis hopes to collect enough signatures to put a measure to legalize marijuana on the 2016 Missouri statewide ballot.
(via Flickr/peter.a photography)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is pardoning five people for non-violent offenses, some of them committed decades ago.  One of those pardoned was convicted for stealing $1.46.

But most of the attention that Nixon is receiving for Friday's announcement is focused on his decision to commute the life sentence of Jeffrey Mizanskey, who has become a major figure in the movement to decriminalize marijuana.

Alex Heuer

Independent filmmaker Bill Streeter joined “Cityscape” guest host Don Marsh to discuss “Lo-Fi Cherokee,” an outgrowth of his award winning music and culture web video series, “Lo-Fi Saint Louis.”

“Lo-Fi Cherokee” is a yearly celebration of the St. Louis music scene featuring 18 live performance videos all produced in a single day in 18 different locations on Cherokee Street. The bands range from veteran national acts to up-and-coming local musical groups.

Alex Heuer

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis returns to Forest Park with the rarely performed “Antony and Cleopatra. Members of the company joined “Cityscape” guest host Don Marsh to discuss the production.

“Antony and Cleopatra” chronicles the love life of Mark Antony, one of three rulers of the Roman Empire, and Cleopatra, the Queen of Egypt, following the assassination of Julius Caesar.

Shirine Babb, an actor who plays the role of Cleopatra, said that in order to prepare for the role, she watched documentaries and read books about Cleopatra.

Flares at the Bridgeton Landfill are used to burn off smelly underground gases.
Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The owners of the Bridgeton Landfill are facing fines from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources over noncompliance with emissions monitoring requirements.

According to a letter from Leanne Mosby, the DNR’s division director, Bridgeton Landfill LLC will be penalized up to $10,000 per violation, per day until the company resolves the issues. According to the letter the company:

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Community Engagement

The Listening Project: What's the best way to build up communities?

At North Side Community School, family members discuss how they're investing in improving the Fairgrounds neighborhood.