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Former Pine Lawn mayor Adrian Wright and the NAACP's Adolphus Pruitt
Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

Suit says Pine Lawn police were used as a tool of political intimidation

The American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri has sued the city of Pine Lawn for using its police department as a tool of political intimidation. The federal lawsuit filed Tuesday centers around the 2013 race for mayor between Sylvester Caldwell, who was the incumbent, and challenger Nakisha Ford, who was backed by former mayor and councilman Adrian Wright.
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St. Louis on the Air

Longtime civil rights advocate Frankie Freeman: ‘There’s still work to be done’

"St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh talked to Freeman, who earlier this month was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

We Live Here

We Live Here: Crime, cops, courts

What's the criminal justice system look like from the perspective of cops, public defenders and convicted criminals? Listen to this week's podcast for a preview.

Public Insight Network

Help inform our coverage

Become part of our Public Insight Network. We use the PIN to get insight from people like you. Today's question: Does Earth Day matter to you?

In Depth

(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio/Mapbox, OpenStreetMap)

McKee’s Hazelwood development owes millions in court judgment, taxes

It’s the not the first time. Developer Paul McKee is facing a $17 million lawsuit over defaulted loans connected to the Northside Regeneration project in St. Louis, and he owes more than $750,000 in property taxes to the city. But in previously reported but somewhat forgotten news, McKee and his company, Hazelwood Logistics Center, LLC, were ordered to pay a bank $32 million in a federal judgment back in 2011. So far, just a small fraction has been paid.
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President and CEO, Maryann Reese, stands in front of St. Elizabeth's Hospital in downtown Belleville, IL. The current building was completed in 1954.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Elizabeth's Hospital gets green light to move to O'Fallon from Belleville

An eight member board of an Illinois health services regulatory agency voted unanimously on Tuesday to approve St. Elizabeth Hospital's plans to relocate from Belleville to O'Fallon. The Illinois Health and Facilties Review Board initially denied the hospital's request in January, but procedures allowed the hospital to submit additional data in an attempt to sway their decision.
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Classical Music

Classical 90.7 KWMU-3

Classical music 24-7. Listen online or with an HD radio.

Dr. William Chapman, surgical director of Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Transplant Center
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

April is National Donate Life Month, a time to remember the importance of organ and tissue donation, as more than 123,000 people are currently awaiting organ transplants in the United States.

Today marks Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner's 100th day in office. He sat down in the Capitol for a one-on-one interview with WUIS Statehouse Bureau Chief Amanda Vinicky.


Copyright 2015 WUIS-FM. To see more, visit http://www.wuis.org/.

St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department Bomb and Arson team members suiting up to address suspicious packages at City Hall.
Courtesy of Maggie Crane, spokesperson for Mayor Francis Slay.

This is a developing story and will be updated. (Last updated 12:56 p.m.)

Several suspicious packages were found at St. Louis City Hall in downtown St. Louis Tuesday morning.

Around 11 a.m. St. Louis Metropolitan Police said the devices had all been secured:

Jason Rojas | Flickr

A Missouri House committee has passed a revised version of a bill to further limit how much revenue from traffic fines cities and towns can use in their budgets.

BJC HealthCare

Unemployed minorities and females looking to enter the construction industry in the St. Louis region now have a new training option.

Board president Lewis Reed signs legislation creating a civilian oversight board for St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.
Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

More than 30 years of work by city aldermen and activists paid off Monday, as the St. Louis Board of Aldermen approved a civilian oversight board for the city's police department.

Applause broke out in the chambers as President Lewis Reed announced the 17-8 vote. Two members voted present, and one alderman did not vote at all.

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

African Americans continue to face long-term and persistent inequities when it comes to employment, income and wealth, according to a report by the Congressional Black Caucus and the Democratic staff of the Joint Economic Committee.  The report, Economic Challenges in the Black Community, says the recession took a greater financial toll on African-American households than it did on white households, increasing the disparity in wealth between blacks and whites.

This diagram is an excerpt of “figure 1” from Ameren’s “Detailed Site Investigation,” showing the location of the company’s proposed coal ash landfill.
Ameren Missouri

A set of proposed amendments to zoning restrictions in Franklin County may pave the way for Ameren to build the coal ash landfill they’ve been pushing for since 2009, despite environmental concerns from residents.  

(Map by Eric Fischer. Data from Census 2010. Base map © OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA)

Like St. Louis, Milwaukee is one of the most segregated cities in the United States.

Jennifer Morales is the author of a new book of that explores relationships between diverse groups.

“I tried to work in a wide range of interactions across group lines, whether that was age, gender or race,” Morales told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. The book is a collection of nine fictional short stories

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

The Politically Speaking podcast team welcomed St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce as its latest guest for what turned out to be a particularly spirited show.

Joyce is a St. Louis native with deep political roots. Both of her parents – Jack and Nellene Joyce – served as aldermen in the 23rd Ward (the old home turf of Mayor Francis Slay.)

Joyce graduated from  Bishop DuBourg High School in south St. Louis and obtained her law degree from Saint Louis University School of Law in 1987.

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Special project

All Ferguson: Your guide to the facts, issues and Justice Department reports

The death of 18-year-old Michael Brown brought to the fore issues that have been developing for decades. Here are our efforts to illuminate what has happened and reflect on-going conversations.

Community Engagement

The Listening Project: What's the best way to build up communities?

At North Side Community School, family members discuss how they're investing in improving the Fairgrounds neighborhood.