St. Louis Public Radio

Top Stories

Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio I File photo

With political career on virtual life support, some wonder how long Greitens can hang on

Members of the Missouri House delivered a big blow to Gov. Eric Greitens this month when they released a startling report on the GOP chief executive’s conduct. The details prompted some on both sides of the aisle to call on Greitens to resign, a demand the governor resisted. Then came the following week, which featured a full collapse of Greitens’ political support and darkening cloud of legal developments.

Read More
Attorney Ed Dowd walks out of a St. Louis courthouse on Thursday, April 19, 2018. A judge ruled that Greitens' felony invasion of privacy trial would continue.
Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

Updated on April 20 at 7:30 p.m. after St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner charged Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens with a felony  On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann break down all the developments in the ongoing saga around Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week was particularly newsworthy. After last week’s release of an explosive House report that led to widespread calls for Greitens to resign, at least four events ended up placing Greitens’ political career on virtual life support. (We uploaded a new version of the show after Greitens was indicted last Friday for felony computer data tampering.)

Gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens looks at his ballot before sitting down to vote at the St. Louis Public Library in the Central West End on Tuesday.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated April 20 at 7 p.m. with statements from Gov. Greitens and his attorney  St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner has charged Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens with a felony related to illegally taking a fundraising list from a veterans charity he co-founded. The charge, a class D felony, is for tampering with computer data. 

It’s the latest legal malady for the GOP governor, who is also facing a felony invasion of privacy charge for allegedly taking a revealing photo of a woman without her consent. 

Gary Gackstatter (at left) composed "Symphony Chaco: A Journey of the Spirit." Choral director Jim Henry  (at right) and renowned Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai are helping him bring the piece to the Touhill stage next week.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Jim Henry has yet to visit New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon, the hallowed, high-desert landscape once home to ancestral Pueblo tribes. But the choral director has already fallen in love with the place, as have his music students at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

That’s due to a new symphony inspired by Chaco from local composer Gary Gackstatter, who is a music professor at St. Louis Community College-Meramec. On Monday, April 23, about 200 singers and instrumentalists from UMSL and from STLCC will perform the symphony during a free concert at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center.

“When I [first] played this piece for my students, they just could not wait to get on the stage,” Henry told host Don Marsh this week on St. Louis on the Air.

Natalie Heath, of Marquette High School, cheers as St. Louis-area high school students speak at a protest outside Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley's office in downtown St. Louis. April 20, 2019
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

High school students from across the St. Louis region took part in another day of action Friday to call for improved school safety and tighter gun control measures.

The protest fell on the 19th anniversary of the school shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, where 13 people were killed. Many consider that event the moment when mass school shootings entered Americans’ consciousness. The Feb. 14 shooting in Parkland, Florida, has rocketed student activists to the center of the debate over guns.

vinwim | Flickr

With four weeks left in the legislative session, Missouri lawmakers are running out of time to pass bills while keeping an eye on the legal battles involving Gov. Eric Greitens.

Curious Louis question-asker Rachel Duncan, left, and St. Louis Public Radio reporter Shahla Farzan, center, speak with Bill Houston of the Saint Louis Zoo.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Rachel Duncan doesn’t remember the first time she visted the St. Louis Zoo, but she’s pretty sure she was an infant.

“There’s not a summer in my life that I have not come to visit the St. Louis Zoo and enjoyed what it has to offer,” said Duncan. “It’s a part of my entire life.”

Like many St. Louisans, she feels personally connected to the animals at the zoo. That prompted her to ask our Curious Louis reporting series: What happens when an animal passes away at the zoo? Do they have a funeral? And how does it impact the workers?


MetroBus at North Hanley Transit Center on April 3, 2018.
Kae Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

Metro Transit's plan to overhaul bus service would make it difficult for people with disabilities and those with limited mobility to catch the bus, residents from throughout the St. Louis region told officials this week.

Under the agency's plan, less-traveled routes would lose stops, while more popular routes would come more frequently.

Hannibal native Melissa Scholes Young is the author of "Flood."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri native Melissa Scholes Young has fond memories of growing up in Hannibal.

“It is a welcome community, it is a place where I’m really proud to be from,” Young told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday. “It is what I still consider my hometown even though I left there when I was 17. I always return to my roots and I’m very aware of the way that being raised in a place with hardworking people ... how that has affected where I’ve gone in the world and the way I live my life.”

Carl Kasell throws out the first pitch on April 14, 2010, at Busch Stadium.
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

In tribute to NPR’s Carl Kasell, who passed away earlier this week, Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air included a segment in remembrance of the longtime newscaster and much-beloved radio personality.

The broadcast featured portions of a 2006 conversation between Kasell and St. Louis Public Radio host Steve Potter. During the interview, Kasell reflected on his decades in the radio business and the growth of NPR since he first joined the organization in 1975.

Nvsted

Ask any entrepreneur to name the hardest part of launching a business, and the answer, inevitably, will be, "money." Some of the greatest startup ideas fizzle for lack of funding.

Nvsted, (pronounced: invested), a hyper-local crowdfunding site, aims to make it easier for St. Louis entrepreneurs to find investors, and vice versa. The St. Louis Economic Development Partnership launched the online platform Wednesday at the Helix Center, a startup accelerator located in the 39 North Plant Science District in Creve Coeur.

Pages

St. Louis on the Air

Monday: 3 towns, 3 moms, 3 city council seats

Host Don Marsh will talk with Jami Dolby, Heather Silverman and Kara Wurtz about their recent bids for local office.

Do you see someone around and think, "Who the heck is that?"

Ask Curious Louis, and we might find out for you.

ASK

Public Insight Network

Help inform our coverage

Become part of our Public Insight Network. We use the PIN to get insight from people like you. Today's question: 10 years later: How are you doing since the Great Recession?