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Missouri Legislature overrides Nixon veto, cuts in welfare benefits to take effect Jan. 1

Updated 4:01 p.m. May 5 - Missouri lawmakers have successfully overridden Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of legislation to reduce lifetime eligibility for welfare recipients.
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St. Louis on the Air

‘For the Sake of All’ project urges community action

"St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh talked to “For the Sake of All” lead researcher Jason Purnell and two community partners about the ongoing project.

We Live Here

The life and times of a police officer.

In this week's podcast, we explore the police perspective. From what it's like on the day-to-day beat to coping with racism within police departments.

Public Insight Network

Help inform our coverage

Become part of our Public Insight Network. We use the PIN to get insight from people like you. Today's question: Have you used/would you use an online doctor?

Community Engagement

The Listening Project: What's the best way to build up communities?

At North Side Community School, family members discuss how they're investing in improving the Fairgrounds neighborhood.

Environment

Geologists from the University of Wisconsin extrude a 6-meter sediment core from the deepest point of Horseshoe Lake.
Sam Munoz | University of Wisconsin

New insights into the curious disappearance of the Cahokia Mounds builders

The people who built and lived among the tall, sculpted mounds now preserved at Cahokia Mounds Historic Site have long presented a mystery to archeologists. One of the biggest mysteries: Why did they leave? A team of geographers studying pollen deposits buried in the sediment under Horseshoe Lake may have stumbled upon new evidence that helps explain Cahokia’s decline. The answers are in the lake butter With boats and an array of sampling equipment, researchers from the University of...
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Gigante puppets pulled by bike in the People's Joy Parade during Cherokee Street's Cinco de Mayo festival Saturday,May 2, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Idealism vs. pragmatism: the economics of Cinco de Mayo

Glittery sombreros big and small. The occasional plastic mustache dangling from sunglasses. Regatón blasting from one speaker, pop tunes blaring on another. Tacos, piña coladas and colorful margaritas in fish bowls. Wrestling, live music and the eccentric, playful People’s Joy Parade. This is Cherokee Street during Cinco de Mayo. A lot of fun for sure, but was Saturday's festival all in good fun or was there an element of cultural appropriation going on?
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May 5 is Give STL Day!

We invite you to support St. Louis Public Radio during this 24-hour day of giving.

Classical Music

Classical 90.7 KWMU-3

Classical music 24-7. Listen online or with an HD radio.

St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch announces that the grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson on any of five counts that were presented to it.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Updated at 4:45 p.m. Tuesday, May 5 with dismissal from federal court.

A federal judge has ruled  that a grand juror who wants to speak out about the experiences of evaluating the evidence in the Michael Brown shooting should bring that case in state court.

(via Google Maps screen capture)

As problems with student learning persist in the Normandy school district, and lawmakers in Jefferson City appear to oppose a cap on tuition paid for student transfers, the vice president of the Missouri state board of education said the end of the district could be close.

help wanted job listing
neetalparekh | Flickr

Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed his second bill of the session on Tuesday. 

This bill, House Bill 150, ties unemployment benefits to the state's jobless rate and would have cut the number of weeks someone could receive benefits to 13 weeks when the jobless rate dips below 6 percent.

Joining host Don Marsh were (from L to R) Vanessa Cooksey, Jason Purnell and Yemi Akande-Bartsch
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

For the Sake of All” is an interdisciplinary project addressing the health and well-being of African Americans in St. Louis City and County that began in 2013. A collaboration of Washington University and Saint Louis University, the project issued five policy briefs illuminating major areas of concern. The first phase culminated in May, 2014 with a final report outlining six recommendations.

Paul McKee
St. Louis Public Radio

Paul McKee’s legal woes are growing.

PNC Bank filed a federal lawsuit late last week in the Southern District of Illinois. It claims McKee, several of his holding companies and the former Corn Belt Bank & Trust defaulted on an $8 million loan from a PNC predecessor.

A sampling of teacups at McCluer High School
Nancy Fowler

A year that began with the trauma of Michael Brown’s death is ending on more positive note, thanks to a traditional tea ceremony this morning at McCluer High School.

Calls of  “To McCluer!” between principal Jane Crawford and the students, and their shared sipping, marked the official ceremony.

It’s the culmination of an art project sponsored by the Craft Alliance arts organization. Since February, 1,500 McCluer students have distilled their hopes and wishes for the future into a few words, small enough to fit on the sides of a two-inch-tall teacup.

ontbonne University professor Jack Luzkow joined host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Jack Luzkow, professor of history at Fontbonne University, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to share details about his book “The Great Forgetting: The Past, Present and Future of Social Democracy and the Welfare State.”

In the book, Luzkow mentioned an array of social issues including the distribution of wealth, taxing the ‘1 percent’, health care, and more.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A Missouri appeals court has upheld the 2011 firing of the city’s former corrections commissioner, Eugene Stubblefield.

The Eastern District of the Missouri Court of Appeals affirmed the July 16, 2014, opinion of Judge Robert Dierker without making its reasoning public. Dierker had ruled there was plenty of evidence that the city of St. Louis had just cause to let Stubblefield go.

Dianne White, as she was professionally known, at work at KSDK
St. Louis Media History Foundation

As the tumultuous ’60s descended upon the nation, Dianne White Clatto emerged unwittingly and unceremoniously as St. Louis’ own embodiment of civil rights history.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay speaks an announcement earlier this year of 24-hour shifts to build a riverfront stadium. Some doubt that Slay will "vigorously defend" an ordinance requiring a vote to publicly fund St. Louis sports stadiums.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

You don’t have to try that hard to get St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay to express effusive support for a new football stadium on his city’s riverfront.

With the St. Louis Rams potentially bolting to the Los Angeles area, Slay joined with Gov. Jay Nixon and numerous labor unions in backing the roughly $1 billion stadium. For the Democratic mayor, the project would not only provide steady work for thousands of people – it would revitalize a rather drab part of St. Louis’ riverfront.

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