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Niang washes some freshly picked produce before selling it to Saint Louis University.
Kim Oswalt | St. Louis Public Radio

Survey seeks ideas on how to make urban agriculture easier in St. Louis

A coalition of food access organizations is surveying city residents to better understand how to encourage more urban agriculture in St. Louis. The effort could lead to an ordinance that will remove some barriers people experience in growing their own food in the city.
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A kit containing the opioid overdose antidote naloxone.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio | file photo

It will likely be months before members of the public can get the opioid overdose antidote naloxone at Missouri pharmacies without a prescription.

A new state law expanding access to the live-saving drug went into effect Sunday, but according to Missouri Pharmacy Association CEO Ron Fitzwater the state’s pharmacy board still has to create rules based on the law.

Missouri Capitol building
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Aug. 28 means  that most of Missouri's new laws passed earlier this year are now in effect.

They include House Bill 1568, which allows anyone to buy naloxone without a prescription, which can then be administered to someone suffering an overdose from heroin or a prescription opioid.  It was sponsored by Rep. Steve Lynch of Pulaski County.

Children play as festival organizers chat with the handful of college students at the Regional Chamber's new festival Saturday morning, Aug. 27, 2016.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

A college outreach event organized by the St. Louis Regional Chamber got off to a slow start Saturday.

The business association held a new festival downtown to introduce college students to what St. Louis has to offer off campus. The hope is that more of them will stay in the area after they graduate if they get to know the region.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, left, speaks with Attorney General Chris Koster earlier this month at the Missouri State Fair. Nixon criticized Koster for a statement the Democratic gubernatorial nominee made about school funding.
Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is taking major issue with a statement issued on Friday by Attorney General Chris Koster about public school funding.

What prompted the governor's response is a statement that Koster’s office released reacting to reports about lead in drinking water at St. Louis Public Schools. In that statement, Koster said the “drinking-water contamination reported this week in St. Louis schools is an unintended — but significant — consequence of the repeated refusal to invest in education and infrastructure.”

LAMP Facebook Page

Where can you get a dental exam, immigration resources, and hear traditional music from Michoacán, Mexico? On Sunday afternoon, your best bet is the third annual community health fair at St. Cecilia Catholic Church on Louisiana Avenue.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis-based Peabody Energy will set aside part of the funding it promised toward future mine reclamation in Illinois.

The coal giant reached a settlement with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources this week. The agreement puts “super-priority” status on $12.9 million for mine reclamation in Illinois, placing that funding ahead of other entities with claims in Peabody’s bankruptcy suit.

The motion for the agreement will be heard by a federal judge on Sept. 15.

More details are emerging about Anheuser-Busch InBev’s takeover of rival brewer SABMiller, which is expected to close in a few weeks.  Documents from both companies provide a glimpse of job cuts, brand growth and reasons behind the roughly $100 billion deal.

Linda Lockhart, Alvin Reid and Chris King reflected on colleague George Curry's life on Friday's "St. Louis on the Air." Curry died last week at the age of 69, but left a journalistic legacy to be admired.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In our weekly "Behind the Headlines" segment, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh discussed the top news stories that caught St. Louisans’ attention this week, with the people who produced them and contributed to them.

(Courtesy Emerald Automotive)

Whatever happened to that company that planned to build electric delivery vans — and create 600 jobs — in Hazelwood?

An archway entrance to Saint Louis University
chuteme | Flickr | Creative Commons

Even before the National Labor Relations Board ruled this week that graduate student assistants at private universities have the right to form unions, Elizabeth Eikmann and her colleagues at Saint Louis University were talking about organizing.

Now, their campaign has begun.

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St. Louis on the Air

Monday: Does screen time help or hinder our kids?

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, Sr. Marysia Weber will join the program to discuss the psychological effects of the internet and technology on children.

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