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(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio)

Businesses along West Florissant down but not out

The burned-out buildings are gone, but one year after Michael Brown’s death the scars at local businesses along West Florissant Avenue are still apparent. At Zisser Tire & Auto Service in Ferguson there is plywood on several windows. Owner John Zisser said he’s just waiting on a city permit to change the window configuration.
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A young man carries a child past boarded up businesses along West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Ferguson Revisited: Residents reflect on how their town has changed

There are still scars in Ferguson. One year after the protests that attracted the world’s attention, many of the damaged stores along West Florissant Road are still boarded up; trust between residents and police has frayed throughout the city; and private relationships have been strained by differences of opinion.
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St. Louis on the Air

Sale of Anheuser-Busch was ‘a win’ for St. Louis craft brewers, beer drinkers

The sale and Anheuser-Busch's accompanying loss of talent opened the floodgates for a surge of craft and microbreweries, say the authors of "St. Louis Brews, 2nd Edition."

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The historic Goldenrod Showboat is currently docked near Kampsville, Ill.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

The historic Goldenrod Showboat has suffered serious structural damage, according to the volunteer group that’s been working to return it to the St. Louis riverfront. 

The group was meeting  Tuesday night to discuss the fate of the century-old showboat, said Hugh McPheeters, president of the nonprofit Historic Riverboat Preservation Association. 

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The latest figures show Missouri revenues are down in some key categories.

The state collected roughly $506.9 million last month, compared to $512.9 million in July 2014, a drop of 1.2 percent.  State Budget Director Linda Luebbering says it's due in part to fraud prevention measures at the federal level.

Jane Dueker at the Missouri Supreme Court April 8, 2015
Pool photo by Karen Elshout | Missouri Lawyers Media

Updated Aug. 4 with Supreme Court ruling -- The reforms required by the passage of Senate Bill 5 don't start taking effect for another six months. But the municipal reform legislation is already having an impact.

The Missouri Supreme Court on Tuesday chucked the Missouri Municipal League's challenge to the way limits on municipal revenue were enforced, saying the passage of the reform measure made the League's arguments moot.

This photograph was published by the Kansas City Star. Jamell Spann, center, at a protest following the Aug. 9, 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown. Elizabeth Vega, right, and several of his friends try to comfort him.
Photo by Robert Cohen of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, distributed by the Associated Press and then published online by the Kansas City Star.

Following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson on Aug. 9, 2014, the world watched the aftermath of the shooting and the subsequent demonstrations and police actions through news coverage, including many stirring photographs. 

One of those photos was taken by St. Louis Post Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen. It was part of a portfolio of work that won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography. The picture shows  a young man, body tensed in anguish, his face in a scream of sorrow, anger, frustration and fear. He is surrounded by other young people and one adult woman, her face grimaced with sadness, her hand on his shoulder in an attempt to comfort him. 

Ernst Zinner
Provided by the family

Ernst K. Zinner, an astrophysicist who spent a distinguished and game-changing career at Washington University -- who, in fact, discovered fossils older than the solar system -- died Thursday, July 30, of complications of mantle cell lymphoma. He was 78 and lived in University City.

Mr. Zinner's interests, his career, the objects of his research, along with his stunning accomplishments, were infinite, as deep and profound as space, aspects of which he knew so well. Although personally modest, his dedication to science was renowned. Colleagues held him in esteem as a brilliant scientist and a nurturing mentor, and as a warm and generous friend.

Felicia Shaw, new executive director of St. Louis' Regional Arts Commission, said she had a sense that this community would now "be open to change" after the events of Ferguson.
Nancy Fowler

When new Regional Arts Commission (RAC) executive director Felicia Shaw realized her job at a San Diego foundation might be eliminated, she wondered what that might mean for her life.

“I was thinking about what new direction I wanted to go in,” Shaw said. “And then, Ferguson happened.”

Embarrassment, sadness, anger and guilt

Last August, when Shaw listened to the news coming from her hometown of St. Louis, she went through a gamut of emotions: embarrassment, sadness, anger and guilt. What she heard loud and clear were the very same issues that drove her to move San Diego — more than three decades earlier.

Clockwise from upper left: Jerry Benner, Katie Banister, Dan Hyatt and Janice Thomas.
Sarah Kellogg | St. Louis Public Radio

Part 2 of 5

The police shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9, 2014, brought the eyes of the world to St. Louis. But it’s the people who live in St. Louis who were impacted most directly.

Now that a year has passed, St. Louis Public Radio is inviting you to share how Brown’s death affected your life, as well as your thoughts about how the events that followed impacted the region as a whole. We are considering a different question every day this week.

Today’s question: What still needs to happen to resolve the issues brought to light this year?

Former Cass County Prosecutor Teresa Hensley
Courtesy of Hensley's Twitter page

When Scott Sifton bowed out of the attorney general’s race last week, Democrats appeared to avoid a resource-draining primary battle between the Affton state senator and St. Louis County Assessor Jake Zimmerman. 

Well, at least for a few hours.

Before the preverbal ink (or, in this site’s case, pixels) dried on Sifton’s departure from the 2016 statewide scene, former Cass County Teresa Hensley announced she would enter the Democratic scramble for attorney. It showed that if the goal of getting Sifton out of the attorney general’s race was to avoid a primary, that plan didn’t really succeed.

Scott Sifton
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week’s edition of Politically Speaking, state Sen. Scott Sifton joins St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies to talk about his decision to scuttle his attorney general bid.

This painting of an officer and an artist wearing a "Hands Up, Don't Shoot" shirt, by Solomon Thurman, shows the thin line between police and protesters, according to gallerist Freida Wheaton.
Solomon Thurman

In a single moment and with a half-dozen gunshots, St. Louis was shaken to the core on Aug. 9.

The shooting death of Michael Brown by Ferguson police office Darren Wilson unleashed continuous waves of local and national protest that significantly shifted the St. Louis arts scene. Since then, musicians, dancers, and visual, performing and literary artists have sung and performed, and written and painted the issues revealed by the tragedy.

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Community Engagement

The Listening Project: Why is it hard to find affordable housing?

Chris Krehmeyer of Beyond Housing explains that few new units are built and roadblocks can trip up those looking