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Unauthorized immigrants in rural areas who seek legal representation can often face roadblocks when trying to find credible lawyers.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis lawmakers and advocates meet to consider immigrants’ economic impact

Immigrants contribute more than a billion dollars to state and federal taxes and account for billions more in spending power, according to Betsy Heller Cohen of the St. Louis Mosaic Project . On Wednesday, Cohen moderated a panel on the economic impact of “foreign-born Missourians” at the International Institute of St. Louis.

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Doris Kearns Goodwin is an award-winning American biographer, historian, and political commentator that specializes in analyzing the administrations of U.S. presidents. She was interviewed by host Don Marsh on Nov. 10 at the St. Louis County Library.
St. Louis County Library

Doris Kearns Goodwin is an award-winning American biographer, historian, and political commentator who specializes in analyzing the administrations of United States presidents. Her latest book, “Leadership: In Turbulent Times,” details how past presidents dealt with crisis.

In today’s polarized political environment, she often gets asked, “Are these the worst of times?”

To that, she answers, “History can provide a perspective.” She cited difficult periods throughout the nation’s history, such as the Civil War, the Great Depression and World War II.

A week after voters approved a measure to legalize medical marijuana in Missouri, the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office announced today that it will stop processing some marijuana possession cases.

Amendment 2, which legalizes medical marijuana with a 4 percent sales tax for veterans programs and job training, passed with 66 percent approval from Missouri voters and even more support from those in Jackson County. Two other medical marijuana proposals were on the state ballot but failed.

Long before Eric Kirkwood of Kansas City, Kansas, had his first sickle cell crisis at age 17, he knew about the pain caused by the disease. His uncle and sister had the genetic disorder, which causes blood cells to clump together and cut off circulation, leaving many patients with pain they describe like being squeezed in a vise.

“I’ve been in so much pain that I’m like ‘Why am I not dying?’” Kirkwood said. “It’s really like torture.”

Cattle farmers across Missouri are facing conditions that could allow for heightened fescue foot in cow herds.

Fescue foot is a condition caused by ingesting Kentucky 31 fescue grass that has been poisoned during growth after a drought. Fescue foot can immobilize cows and cause hoof loss.

“We expect it to be worse than in previous years,” MU Extension specialist Craig Roberts said.

When a herd faces fescue foot, it affects more than just a few cows.

The Missouri Department of Transportation is suspending construction of the eastbound bridge on Interstate 44 at Shrewsbury on Nov. 13, 2018. Inspectors found cracks in westbound bridge, which was finished a year ago.
The Missouri Department of Transportation

Residents in the Shrewsbury area will have to wait a bit longer for their ramp on Interstate 44 to reopen.

The Missouri Department of Transportation announced Tuesday that it has suspended construction on the eastbound bridge of I-44 over the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad by Shrewsbury.

The halt comes after inspectors found a "greater-than-normal" amount of cracking on the westbound bridge on I-44 that just wrapped up construction last year.

 Mercy Hospital in St. Louis.
File photo | Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

A handful of St. Louis area hospitals received a high rating for patient safety in a report from the medical watchdog nonprofit, the Leapfrog Group.

Most of the 27 acute-care hospitals in the  region had documented problems with hospital-acquired infections, physician and nurse training and surgical complications, according to the group, which ranks 2,600 U.S. hospitals twice a year.

The St. Louis-area hospitals that received “A” ratings include Mercy hospitals in Festus and St. Louis, St. Anthony’s in Alton, St. Joseph’s in Breese and St. Elizabeth’s in O’Fallon, Illinois.

Students cross Grand Boulevard on St. Louis University's campus Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 7 p.m. with additional details and comments — St. Louis University is implementing more cost-cutting measures as fiscal problems persist, even after trimming its workforce last year.

The private, Catholic university is facing a double blow of fewer students and less revenue from its doctors, resulting in a projected $30 million deficit by 2023.

University President Fred Pestello outlined the monetary challenge in an email to faculty and staff Monday afternoon, and additional details were shared with employees during a Faculty Senate meeting today.

Historian Carol Shepley has added about 50 pages' worth of fresh content to her 2014 book "St. Louis: An Illustrated Timeline," which was first published during the Gateway City's 250th birthday.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

About four years ago, Carol Shepley was busy putting the final touches on her visually oriented history of St. Louis as the city celebrated 250 years. But there was still much more St. Louis history yet to be told, including with regard to the tragedy and unrest that rocked the region that same month she finished her book.

“When I completed work on the first edition, it was the end of August 2014, and Michael Brown was killed August 9th,” Shepley recalled Tuesday on St. Louis on the Air while talking with host Don Marsh.

In the months and years since that period, Shepley has updated “St. Louis: An Illustrated Timeline” to include more information and her own conclusions about the regional and political activity surrounding the police shooting that sparked the Black Lives Matter movement.

File photo | St. Louis Public Radio
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Nov. 13 at 4:15 p.m. with comment from St. Louis Lambert International Airport — St. Louis City NAACP President Adolphus Pruitt said Tuesday the decision to add St. Louis Lambert International Airport to an NAACP warning list came after the group received documents about race-based complaints going back at least several years.

“Our intent (of the advisory) is to let folk know that those folks working at Lambert Field that their civil rights are in jeopardy, and maybe in some cases null and void, unless the city takes some proactive means of addressing it,” Pruitt said.

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead spoke with host Don Marsh on this Tuesday's St. Louis on the Air.
EVIE HEMPHILL | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Jazz music has undergone a series of important changes over the course of its history. Jazz critic for NPR’s Fresh Air Kevin Whitehead told host Don Marsh on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air that there are a handful of characteristics that bind seemingly dissimilar styles of music to the singular genre of jazz.

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St. Louis on the Air

Thursday: Local doctor talks politics, gun violence and medicine

Host Don Marsh will talk with Dr. Sonny Saggar about doctors' responses to the NRA's tweet last week that suggested medical professionals should “stay in their lane” when it comes to guns.