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Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks to reporters after the 2017 adjourned. Greitens didn't have the smoothest relationship with legislators — including Republicans that control both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison has rejected efforts by defense attorneys for Governor Eric Greitens to speed up the date of his invasion of privacy trial.

During a hearing today Burlison said he would not be swayed by events happening in Jefferson City. Attorneys for the governor had wanted to finish the trial before a special House committee investigating him issued its report in April.

A spokeswomen for prosecutor Kim Gardner says she is pleased with the ruling.

The case goes to trial May 14.

Visiting Nurse Association of Greater St. Louis’ Carol Emmerich (left) and Mike Roberts (right) talked about how people can deal with feelings of grief.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

When a person nears the end of their life, feelings of grief can increase and unaddressed matters often add to the complications.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about how people can deal with those issues. Visiting Nurse Association of Greater St. Louis’ Mike Roberts, public relations and communications manager, and Carol Emmerich, director of hospice care, joined him for the conversation.

J Street founder Jeremy Ben-Ami (left) and Rabbi Jim Bennett (right) talked about being “pro-Israel and pro-peace” in the 21st century.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

There is a divide in the fundamental beliefs among supporters of Israel regarding the future of the Israel-Palestine conflict. For Jeremy Ben-Ami, pursuit of peace is something he considers critical to the security and survival of the State of Israel in the 21st century.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with the J Street president about his organization and his appearance this week at Congregation Shaare Emeth. Rabbi Jim Bennett also joined the conversation about being “pro-Israel and pro-peace.” 

Monsanto is expected to keep a large operation in the St. Louis region after the Bayer buyout goes into effect.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A critical part of Bayer's multi-billion dollar buyout of Creve Coeur-based Monsanto has been approved. The European Union has signed off on the deal, but with conditions. 

Tony Monetti
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome Republican U.S. Senate candidate Tony Monetti to the program.

Monetti is one of 20 people that have signed up to run for the seat that U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill currently holds. Ten Republicans, including Attorney General Josh Hawley, have filed thus far.


A St. Louis-based mobile app and website aims to help parents find summer activities for their kids, all in one place.

Blueprint4SummerSTL aggregates a list of wide-ranging activities for parents to choose from based on a child’s specific needs, including the cost, distance, interests, age, before and after care, as well as scholarship availability.

Missouri Dept. of Corrections

Updated 11:07 p.m. – Russell Bucklew's scheduled execution has been called off.

In a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a stay Tuesday evening, based on Bucklew's assertion that Missouri's lethal injection protocol would cause bleeding and suffocation due to a medical condition he suffers.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks with reporters in the Missouri Governor's Mansion on Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018.
File photo | Erin Achenbach I St. Louis Public Radio

Attorneys for Gov. Eric Greitens are again asking a judge to throw out the felony invasion of privacy charge against their client, saying grand jurors heard no evidence that he had committed a crime.

“In answering a grand juror’s concern about the lack of a photograph, Assistant Circuit Attorney Robert Steele, whether intentional or not, flagrantly misstated the applicable law — misleading the entire grand jury as to the essential elements of the crime on which it was asked to vote,” defense attorney James Martin wrote in a motion to dismiss filed late Monday. For that reason, he said, the charges should be dismissed.

Saint Louis University High School sophomore Bryce Van Bree (at left), music director Jeff Pottinger (center) and senior Emanuel Parker discussed what the serendipitous experience was like on Tuesday’s show.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Last week, Jeff Pottinger and his band of 40-some Saint Louis University High School students were enjoying a trip they knew they’d remember for years to come when it suddenly became exponentially more unforgettable.

They were partway through a musical performance just outside St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican when Pope Francis himself approached the group, listened to them play, then talked with them and even took a few selfies with the teens.

“Magical” is one word that Pottinger used to sum up the experience while discussing it on Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air with host Don Marsh.

Ken Cooper (left) and Bing Dempewolf (right) talked about different ways to address and prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Even with more awareness and updated policies surrounding the issue of sexual harassment, offensive advances and interactions in the workplace have not gone away. But have employers overlooked other ways to deal with the matter?

Ken Cooper, corporate trainer and author of "Stop It Now: How Targets and Managers Can End Sexual Harassment," thinks so. He said workplaces need to address the matter beyond the legal ramifications and introduce behavioral trainings once.

People lined up outside the Fox Thatre last October to buy "Hamilton" tickets.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louisans who missed out on “Hamilton” tickets now have a chance to see the sold-out musical — for the cost of a box of popcorn.

On Monday, the Fox Theater announced a lottery in which 40 orchestra-level tickets for every performance will go for $10 each. The lottery begins April 1 for the April 3 opening night.

Lottery participants can enter only once for the chance to get two tickets.

Students at Maplewood Richmond Heights remember the victims of the Feb. 14 school shooting in Parkland, Florida.
File Photo| Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Since the fatal shooting of students in Florida in February, many young activists have organized walkouts, rallies and calls to action. On March 24, young people all over the country will take to the streets again in a nationwide rally they’re calling “March For Our Lives.”

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with local students involved in myriad causes they are passionate about to discuss youth’s role in activism.

Gov. Eric Greitens speaks to reporters in his office at the state Capitol in Jefferson City on January 22, 2018.
FIle photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Attorneys for Gov. Eric Greitens want to get his felony invasion of privacy case tried as soon as possible.

His defense team told St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison on Monday they plan to file a motion to move the trial date to April 3, from its current date of May 14. They are also planning to ask that Burlison hear the case, rather than have it go before a jury.

Josephine Baker, who grew up in the Mill Creek Valley neighborhood and lived much of her adult life in France, is the focus of an episode of “The Nod.”
Jac. de Nijs | Dutch National Archives

Josephine Baker is remembered for being many different things over the course of her remarkable life – a burlesque performer, a film actress, an activist, even a war hero. Less well known is the St. Louis-born celebrity’s role as a mother to 12 ethnically diverse children she began adopting in the 1950s as her “rainbow tribe.”

State Rep. Cloria Brown
File photo I Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

By her own admission, Cloria Brown didn’t expect to get involved in Missouri politics. But after a highly successful business career, Brown felt it was the right time to give back to her community in south St. Louis County.

“I never had any political ambitions,” Brown said during a 2015 edition of Politically Speaking. “But I didn’t want the job to just be given to someone. And I thought I represented the area pretty well. I was doing service, and I said, 'This is another way to serve.’”

Mayor Lyda Krewson answers questions alongside panelists David Dwight, of the Ferguson Commission, and State Rep. Bruce Franks Jr. Oct. 11, 2017
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A new assessment of St. Louis residents finds that many people want the city to address racial, economic and social inequality.

The findings are a part of the preliminary resilience assessment released by Mayor Lyda Krewson’s office. The assessment received contributions from the 100 Resilient Cities initiative, a program funded by the Rockefeller Foundation to strengthen cities around the world in areas of social, economic and environmental shortcomings.

City officials sought the input of over 1,300 people through meetings, surveys and workshops.

An ancient Egyptian mummy named Pet Menekh is placed in a CT scanner at the Washington University School of Medicine.
Washington University School of Medicine

In a dark room on the third floor of the Saint Louis Art Museum, nearly a dozen grade school boys encircled a tour guide, who was dispensing facts about Egyptian mummies. But instead of crowding around three mummies lying nearby in glass cases, they stood in front of a recently added feature to the exhibit: a touchscreen that displays images of what the mummies look like inside.

Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers have left Jefferson City for their annual spring break.

Republican leaders are touting their accomplishments and suggesting that the scandal surrounding Gov. Eric Greitens has had little effect on the day-to-day business of the legislature.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is in political limbo after being indicted for felony invasion of privacy charges.
Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann round up this week’s legal and political news surrounding Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week’s episodes focuses on how the governor’s allies and adversaries are trying to alter public opinion in the run up to his felony invasion of privacy trial on May 14.

Most Broadway actors relax on their Monday days off. But on Monday, April 16, "Hamilton" star Mandy Gonzalez will come to St. Louis to help raise awareness and funds for St. Louis’ december Magazine. She stars as Angelica Schuyler in the Broadway hit.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Gonzalez about her career and upcoming performance in St. Louis, as well as with Gianna Jacobsen, the publisher of december Magazine, a non-profit literary journal headquartered in St. Louis.