Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Alex Heuer

Talk Show Producer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Illinois and worked for a few years at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in 6 - 12th grade social studies. In 2016, he earned a Master of Public Policy Administration with a focus in nonprofit organization management and leadership from University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

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SLSO Music Director David Robertson in an interview with St. Louis Public Radio
Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

The acoustics of Powell Hall. The musicians. The audience.

David Robertson acknowledges that embarking on his final season as music director of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra is “bittersweet.” Robertson, however, who’s been with the SLSO since 2005, isn’t looking back just yet. He’s focused on the orchestra’s upcoming season, its 138th.

A St. Louis County police officer advances toward protesters blocking Brentwood Blvd. in front of Galleria mall Wednesday evening.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday's St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by St. Louis Public Radio editor Erica Hunzinger to discuss protests and response to the not-guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the St. Louis region. 

Some of the latest stories our newsroom has produced are:

Laura Solsten, 60, of Creve Coeur, prays during a vigil Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017, in downtown St. Louis.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday's St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by St. Louis Public Radio Executive Editor Shula Neuman to discuss protests and responses to the not-guilty verdict of Jason Stockley in the St. Louis region. 

Some of the latest stories our newsroom has produced include:

Flickr

Missouri leads the country when it comes to the prevalence of injuries due to falls among older adults. The injuries can cause lost independence and mobility, and result in considerable medical bills.

One in four adults age 65-plus will fall this year. Why this problem is most acute in Missouri is not exactly known.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed risk factors and how to prevent falls.

Joining him for the discussion were:

Nine acts were invited by the St. Louis Blues to perform at a game this season.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Blues have invited nine acts to perform the national anthem at a game this upcoming season.

The invitations are the result of a partnership between the Blues and the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, an audition process that took place on a recent Saturday at Powell Hall. The Blues and SLSO selected more than one winner after being impressed by the abundance of local talent.

Open to solo singers, groups and instrumentalists, more than 650 contestants sent in video applications. Thirty-four were invited to participate.

Annie Malone, Josephine Baker, King Baggot, Ginger Rogers and Jane Darwell are just a few people with St. Louis and Missouri ties who have made significant contributions to film.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Jason Rosenbaum
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jason Rosenbaum about the ongoing fallout and what might happen after controversial comments made by a Democratic and Republican state legislator.

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal made a Facebook comment wishing for President Donald Trump’s assassination.

State Rep. Warren Love commented that people who damage Confederate statues should be found and hanged from a tree.

Amazon's shipping operation, known as a "wish fulfillment center,'' in Edwardsville.
File photo | Jo Mannies | St. Louis Public Radio

Amazon’s announcement of plans to build a second headquarters in North America has city leaders throughout the continent expressing interest in putting together a competitive bid.

The company’s new headquarters would amount to more than $5 billion in spending and house as many as 50,000 employees.

Amid recent and ongoing destruction caused by Hurricane Harvey, the recovery effort will take center stage.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with Suzanna Long, professor and department chair of engineering management and systems engineering at Missouri S&T in Rolla.

They addressed what a comprehensive recovery plan looks like and assess the potential for disasters in Missouri.

Nudo House co-owners Qui Tran and Marie-Anne Velasco
Michelle Volansky | Sauce Magazine

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine was back and provided some tips to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of September.

Derek Olson via Flickr

When should parents give children their first cellphone or smartphone? What factors should be considered? How do maturity, development and sleep considerations play into it all? 

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh talked about the issues with two doctors:

St. Louis poet Alison Rollins
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis poet and librarian Alison Rollins started along her poetry journey in high school at Nerinx Hall in Webster Groves.

She is now a published poet, is pursuing a library sciences degree and is the librarian at the high school she attended.

Richard Dudman in 2014.
Family photo provided by Bill Freivogel

Earlier this month, longtime journalist Richard Dudman passed away at the age of 99.

Dudman led the Washington Bureau of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from 1969 to 1981. In 1970, he was captured in Cambodia while reporting and held for 40 days. He wrote about the Kennedy assassination, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Vietnam War, the Pentagon Papers and more.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about the life of Dudman with Bill and Margaret Wolf Freivogel, two people who knew him well.

Lois Wood, former executive director at Land of Lincoln Legal Assistance Foundation in East St. Louis
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

For 43 years, Lois Wood helped low income and elderly residents in Illinois receive legal assistance.

The executive director of the nonprofit Land of Lincoln Legal Assistance Foundation in East St. Louis retired a few weeks ago.

“It’s been a long time since I’ve had time off in any reasonable amount,” Wood said as she reflected on her long career with St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

Portion of Pageant and Masque panorama photo showing crew and assorted costumed cast members with Art Hill seating visible in the distance. Photograph, 1914. Missouri History Museum Photographs and Prints Collections.
Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum

A new 6,000-square-foot exhibit opening September 2nd at the Missouri History Museum contains panoramic photographs of St. Louis from 1900 to 1950.

“People are going to feel like they are stepping into a moment in St. Louis history,” said Adam Kloppe, public historian for the Missouri History Museum and content lead for “Panoramas of the City.”

The moments captured in the exhibit include the following 35 foot long photographs:

Walter Trout plays at the main stage of the Big Muddy Blues Festival in St. Louis on Sept. 1, 2013.
Fred Ortlip via Flickr

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, contributor Steve Potter talked about this year’s Big Muddy Blues Festival. The primarily outdoor festival takes place on Laclede's Landing and includes 50 acts on three stages, three indoor clubs and two events at the National Blues Museum.

“St. Louis has on the greatest heritages of music in the world. Often I think that we need national acts … but we have something special here in St. Louis so that’s what we’re featuring,” said Jeremy Segel-Moss, a musician and co-coordinator of the Big Muddy Blues Festival.

Jamie Sentnor (L) and Deborah Phelps (R) joined host Don Marsh to talk about caring for seriously ill relatives and for the people who provide care.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

“The supply of family caregivers will not keep pace with the future demand as our population ages and people live with multiple complex chronic conditions,” argued the authors of a recent academic article in Generations: Journal of American Society on Aging.

This point highlights an impending shortage of caregivers but also of concern is how the people who take care of our older population are cared for themselves.

A conceptualization of what the future of men's fashion will look like, part of the "Reigning Men" exhibit at the St. Louis Art Museum.
Saint Louis Art Museum

Created by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, “Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear,” is showing in St. Louis – the second and only other planned stop in the U.S., aside from L.A.

The exhibition examines the kind of men who wore certain clothing as well as the clothing itself and the culture in which it was worn.

It’s thematically organized into five galleries beginning with “Revolution/Evolution.” A big part of that gallery focuses on the French Revolution.

Kathy Favazza (L) and Nika Leoni (R) are the co-founders of Make Music St. Louis, the organization responsible for bringing Make Music Day to St. Louis.
Alicia Lee | St. Louis Public Radio

If you happened to be in the Delmar Loop on Wednesday or in a number of other places in the St. Louis area, it’s likely you heard live music.

Those sounds were part of Make Music Day, an international holiday that’s celebrated in more than 750 cities worldwide including more than 50 in the United States. 

Opera singers Nika Leoni and Kathy Favazza are co-founders of the event in St. Louis.

Archaeologists with the Missouri Department of Transportation work near the Poplar Street Bridge in downtown St. Louis in April.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Archaeologists from the Missouri Department of Transportation believe they have found artifacts and evidence of permanent residences in St. Louis prior to 1764, when the city became a permanent trading post along the Mississippi River.

The discoveries and inferences that archaeologists can derive from them add nuance to the complex story of how St. Louis became an important commerce center in the 18th century – more than a decade prior to United States’ independence and nearly 40 years before the country acquired St. Louis through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

This photo went viral earlier this year and features five Collage Dance Collective ballerinas. From left to right: Brandye Lee, Daphne Lee, Kimberly Ho-Tsai, Nikki Taylor and Luisa Cardoso
Photo provided by Kevin Thomas | Credit: Andrew J. Breig

The 10th annual Spring to Dance Festival gets underway Friday night at the Touhill Performing Arts Center at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Featured among the 30 professional dance companies is Collage Dance Collective, a Memphis-based company.

Kevin Thomas, the company’s artistic director, explained to St. Louis on the Air contributor Steve Potter on Friday that Collage Dance Collective is a contemporary ballet company.

Black Lives Matter posters were placed on the Confederate monument in Forest Park on Tuesday, May 23, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The question of whether a Confederate monument in Forest Park should be removed was explored on our weekly Behind the Headlines segment amid the controversy surrounding it.

Some people want it removed, including St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson and Treasurer Tishaura Jones, who launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for its removal.

This gold mummy case is one of the replica artificats on display at a new exhibit at the Saint Louis Science Center.
Provided | Saint Louis Science Center

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, Egyptologist Bob Brier joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss a new exhibit opening at the Saint Louis Science Center.

The exhibit puts guests in the shoes of archeologist Howard Carter when he discovers King Tutankhamun tomb and features recreations of many other artifacts.

“The Discovery of King Tut” opens May 27 and runs through January 7.

Yo-Yo the Narrator, performed by Cecil MacKinnon, is a mainstay at Circus Flora.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

After a nearly 150 year run, the famed Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus performed its final show on Sunday in New York.

Here in St. Louis, circus performers were watching a live video stream of the event in a tent of their own.

“It was wonderfully heartfelt, some of the things the performers said, especially about the role of animals in people’s lives,” said Cecil MacKinnon, Circus Flora’s theater director, who joined St. Louis on the Air contributor Steve Potter on Thursday.

Stephen Zwolak and Tamar Jacobson joined "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh to talk about early childhood education.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio; Provided | Tamar Jacobson

The importance of a child’s early years cannot be overstated. 

“According to all the research of brain development, the earliest years are the most important in terms of laying down the social/emotional wellbeing of children,” said Tamar Jacobson, a professor of Early Childhood Education at Rider University in New Jersey. 

Author Scott Turow is the author of the new novel, "Testimony."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In his latest novel, “Testimony,” author Scott Turow was able to combine two longtime interests: the International Criminal Court in The Hague and the Romani ethnic group.

“This was sort of a writers’ bucket list,” Turow said of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in the Netherlands.

The other interest, the Roma ethnic group intertwines with the ICC as Turow writes about the disappearance of an entire Roma refugee camp following the Bosnian War.

Maureen Kavanaugh recently released an updated version of Elizabeth McNulty’s popular book “St. Louis Then and Now,” which pairs archive and contemporary photographs that tell the story of St. Louis through its landmarks.

On Tuesday, Kavanaugh joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss the updated book.

“Some of it is exactly the same,” Kavanaugh said of the book.

In most circumstances, the ‘then’ and ‘now’ photos are taken from the same angle, though Kavanaugh said that wasn’t possible in every instance because of new construction.

The floating McDonald's was a fixture on the St. Louis riverfront for 20 years but closed in 2000.
(Courtesy of Cameron Collins)

Do you pine for the swinging orange chairs and plush booths of The Parkmoor? Do you miss the thrill of the Coral Court Motel on Watson? Do you wish you could visit the orange soda-guzzling Phil the Gorilla, the king of the St. Louis Zoo?

You’re not alone in that pang you feel when you think back on the bygone St. Louis institutions of yesteryear. Cameron Collins, the author of the popular local Distilled History blog, has felt the nostalgia too.

Dr. Richard Eells House in Quincy, Illinois
(Courtesy Arts Quincy)

The Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, was a major stop on the Underground Railroad as slaves attempted to make their way from Missouri to a free state.

Quincy’s role in the Underground Railroad – a network of often secretive locations used to help enslaved people escape to free states and Canada – is highlighted in the events that took place at the home of Dr. Richard Eells and his wife, Jane, during the mid-19th century.

On June 14, 1897, Lt. James Moss, U.S. Army, led his bicycle corps of the 25th Infantry, from Fort Missoula, Montana, up a wagon trail and Indian path, to St. Louis, arriving  on July 16, 1897.
Public Domain | Wikimedia Commons

More than a century ago, in 1897, U.S. Army soldiers road bicycles 1,900 miles, from Fort Missoula, Montana to St. Louis.

The 20 soldiers who made the trip were part of the 25th Infantry, a racially-segregated group known as Buffalo Soldiers. The term refers to black soldiers who served west of the Mississippi River in regiments initially formed in 1866, after the end of the Civil War.

“It was a very exciting event,” Angela da Silva, a historian and adjunct professor at Lindenwood University, told St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.

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