Alex Heuer

Talk Show Producer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and worked for a time at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. In 2016, he earned a Master of Public Policy Administration with a focus in nonprofit organization management and leadership from University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Ways to Connect

(via Flickr/AndrewEick)

The holiday season abounds with well-known Christmas stories and cherished family traditions.

In this St. Louis Public Radio holiday special, we asked our listeners and some members of our staff to share with us their favorite holiday memories, stories and gifts.

We included those stories and well-known stories such as a staff-reading of “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” “Yes Virginia, There is a Santa Claus,” and part of “A Christmas Carol.”

We also featured music by the Ambassadors of Harmony of St. Charles and Bach Society of Saint Louis.

Ellwyn Kauffman

The renowned Marchiachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano joins the Compton Heights Concert Band in its 15th Annual Holiday Spectacular on Saturday, December 23 in the Peabody Opera House. 

William Bascomb

Philip Barnes conducts the Saint Louis Chamber Chorus in "Wonder Upon Wonder Will Arrive to Me,"
the third concert of the ensemble's 57th season, on Sunday, December 23.  The a cappella chorus will perform three major works to explore the wonder of the mystery of Christ's birth including Spanish Renaissance composer Tomas Luis de Victoria's "Missa O Magnum Mysterium," a series of motets for the Nativity and the Epiphany by French composer Francis Poulenc and another setting of "O Magnum Mysterium" by Sir Maxwell Davies. 

(Courtesy: RAYGUN)

The Midwest sometimes gets short shrift from people on both ends of the country.  They often call it “flyover country.”  In other words, they ask, “Why would anyone want to stop in the Midwest?”

Native Midwesterners or transplants might take exception to the term, “flyover country.”

One man who certainly takes exception to the term is Mike Draper.

Jason Van Eaton, Kit Bond Strategies

Earlier this month, Missouri and St. Louis-area leaders wrapped up a trade mission to China.  The trip was designed, in part, to revive the so-called China Hub project.

Members of the Midwest-China Hub Commission and the American Society of Transportation and Logistics signed an agreement in Shanghai to pursue expanding trade between the U.S. and China, and in particular adding new airfreight routes between the Asian nation and St. Louis. 

Bill Raack, St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch says arming school personnel should be considered when discussing ways to improve school safety.

Host Don Marsh talked with Fitch about his proposal, which he made a couple of days after the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. 

Fitch acknowledged that there are serious concerns about his proposal but said he hasn’t heard any other ideas for how to address the lag time when someone starts shooting and police can respond.    

(via Flickr/Tax Credits)

It’s said that one of the certainties in life is taxes.  However, taxes for 2012 are to some degree, uncertain because of ongoing negotiations over the so-called fiscal cliff.

Host Don Marsh talked with tax expert Lance Weiss, C.P.A., of SFW Partners, LLC about end-of-year tax preparations and what can be done to minimize the amount owed on federal and state income tax returns due in April.

James Cridland via Flickr

The recent school shooting in Connecticut brought up renewed discussions about the relevance of an Illinois appellate court’s ruling which endorsed the right to conceal and carry.

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon announced a new appointment to the state Supreme Court.  And, the LGBT community in St. Louis County recently received good news.

Host Don Marsh talked with a panel of experts during a monthly legal roundtable discussion.

Guests:

For the second time, the Kirkwood High School Symphonic Orchestra is preparing for a trip to New York City.  In March of 2010, the ensemble performed in Carnegie Hall, one of three orchestras invited to do so.  The orchestra has again been honored by its selection to compete in the prestigious National Orchestra Cup on March 2, 2013 in Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall.  The KHS Symphonic Orchestra will compete with several other orchestras from around the county for the title of Grand Champion and the National Cup.

(Copyright: Joan Marcus)

WICKED is about the untold story of the witches of Oz.

The musical is based on the 1995 novel written by Gregory Maguire, WICKED: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West.  While many people know the 1939 film, The Wizard of Oz, both stories take place in a world based on L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful World of Oz, written in 1900.

(Courtesy: Sauce Magazine)

Sauce Magazine readers are accustomed to the annual readers’ choice edition which comes out in July.

At the end of 2012, St. Louis Public Radio has partnered with the publication in our monthly Sound Bites segment to talk about some of the best dishes, trends, and things to look forward to in the coming year.

(Courtesy: HarperCollins Publishers)

When St. Louis native Bill Knoedelseder pitched the idea for a TV series about a wealthy brewing, baseball-team-owning family, Hollywood was skeptical. How could a Midwestern mansion hold a candle next to, say, an oil family in Dallas?

(via Flickr/Rojer)

Midwesterners are often known for their kindness and, unfortunately, some people take advantage of it, especially during the holidays.

Host Don Marsh talked with Bill Smith, an investigator for the St. Louis Better Business Bureau.

They addressed ways to avoid becoming the victim of so-called “grinches,” including these twelve tips to outsmart scammers.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

Going over the so-called fiscal cliff is the major talk in Washington D.C. though the Missouri and Illinois delegations are dealing with other issues as well.

Host Don Marsh talked with St. Louis Beacon Washington D.C. Correspondent Rob Koenig about the latest news from the nation’s capital, including the fiscal cliff.

(via Flickr/Eric Fischer)

The “Delmar Divide” refers to Delmar Boulevard in St. Louis.  It is a street which runs east/west and to a large extent separates the racial make-up of the city.  In a sample of households north and south of Delmar, residents south of Delmar Boulevard are 73% white, while residents north of Delmar are 98% African American, as the BBC pointed out in, “Crossing a St. Louis street that divides communities,” last year.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The main location of the St. Louis Public Library system has reopened after a $70 million renovation and restoration.

The downtown landmark was unveiled to the public on Sunday, December 9, 2012 after more than two years of construction.

Host Don Marsh talked with Waller McGuire, Executive Director of the St. Louis Public Library and George Nikolajevich of Cannon Design.

As St. Louis Public Radio’s Rachel Lippmann reported:

St. Louis Symphony

Each Spring, Circus Flora sets up its “big top” in the parking lot of Powell Hall.  Over the years, the Flying Wallendas, Nino the Clown, and the St. Louis Arches have become familiar to many St. Louisans.  

For the second time, Circus Flora will move inside the hall, high wires and all, to join the St. Louis Symphony in a holiday production which will bring to life Dylan Thomas’ classic, “A Child’s Christmas in Wales.” 

(Provided By: Terry Baker Mulligan)

When born and bred New Yorker Terry Baker Mulligan moved to Saint Louis in the early seventies, she was met with pre-conceived notions about her hometown.

She says her new friends and colleagues thought New Yorkers were rude and the city was filled with trouble and uneasiness.

After leaving her teaching job in 1974 to raise her growing family, she began a 35 year journey to preserve her life and focus on the goodness of the place she once called home and still holds dear.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Kirkwood resident Anne Williams is a certified historic interpreter and has volunteered at the Daniel Boone Home in Defiance, Missouri since 1996.

She combines history and literature, dresses in period clothing and shares with guests the historic context of stories and the authors who write them.

Among other things, she performs at special events for the National Park Service including at the Old Court House and Grant’s Home.  She recites the Declaration of Independence every year in Kirkwood.

(Courtesy: Jenny Dibble)

When Jenny Dibble returned to St. Louis after five years on the West Coast, she was struck by two features of her hometown’s entrepreneurial culture: one, it was way bigger and more dynamic than she expected; and two, there were a lot of men.

“At every event I attended, I noticed a strange absence of women,” Dibble said.

She decided to investigate and found that she was not the only St. Louis businesswoman craving a community. From that, the idea for Women Entrepreneurs of St. Louis (WEST) was born.

(Courtesy: Saint Louis University Medical Center)

The World Health Organization has declared tuberculosis a global health emergency.

There is already a TB vaccine given to infants in countries other than the United States  but it was developed more than sixty years ago.  That vaccine protects babies from the worst forms of TB but it does not protect adolescents and adults from a type of tuberculosis which accounts for most cases of the disease.

(via Flickr/slgckgc)

The St. Louis Holocaust Museum and Learning Center debuts a new interactive exhibit called “Change Begins With Me: Confronting Hate, Discrimination and Ethnic Conflict” this week on the premise that “the lessons of the Holocaust are not yet learned.”

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

George Will is a Pulitzer Prize-winning political journalist and author.  He is perhaps most well-known for his conservative columns in the Washington Post, which have appeared in the paper since 1974.

Will is scheduled to deliver the fall 2012 keynote speech for the John C. Danforth Center on Religion & Politics at Washington University.

When the Kennedy family approached author David Nasaw asking him to write a biography of Joseph P. Kennedy, father of the nine Kennedy children, he tried to say no.

“I said over and over and over again: you don’t want me to write this book. I’m a crazy-obsessive researcher - I’m going to find something the family doesn’t like,” Nasaw told “St. Louis on the Air” guest host Jim Kirchherr. “[But] they said, ‘Anything that you write is going to be better than the garbage that’s out there.’"

The Luminary Center for the Arts opened in 2007 and strives to provide a platform for the presentation of innovative art, music and cultural projects.

Its temporary exhibition space now hosts Social Security, a constellation of five galleries individually curated by area alternative spaces which have shuttered or shifted in form within the past year.

Among other things, the exhibition explores the how the arts community is evolving.

Ariana Tobin / St. Louis Public Radio

John Pizzarelli is a world-renowned jazz guitarist and singer.

He has recorded dozens of albums and is now the author of a new memoir called, World on a String: A Musical Memoir.

Pizzarelli’s latest album is Double Exposure.  It is a collection of tunes by songwriters of traditional songs framed within traditional jazz arrangements.

Host Steve Potter talked with John Pizzarelli about his career and upcoming appearance in St. Louis.  Pizzarelli also performed live during the interview.

Brad Blackburn

Songbird Café is a local St. Louis production which features songwriters playing and sharing stories about their own music and an audience intent on listening in an intimate environment.

Steve St. Cyr, a recently retired accountant, is the organizer and producer of Songbird Café, which for the past year, takes place at the Focal Point in Maplewood on an almost monthly basis.

St. Cyr got the inspiration for his project from the Bluebird Café in Nashville, Tennessee – a listening room which has launched the career of several well-known music artists.

(Courtesy Photo)

John Seigenthaler is a journalist and champion of the First Amendment.  He was previously an editor and publisher of The Tennessean in Nashville and was the founding editorial director of USA Today.  Prior, he served as a special assistant to Robert F. Kennedy during the 1960s, when Kennedy served as U.S. Attorney General. 

During his time as a special assistant, Seigenthaler was involved and injured while trying to protect some of the freedom riders in Alabama.

(Photo By: Richard Stamelman / Provided By: Random House)

The guest on today’s program was Calvin Trillin.  He’s a guest of top billin’.

He talked with host Don Marsh.  It was an interview, which despite the political climate, was not harsh.

Trillin is a journalist, humorist, and author of “Dog Fight: The 2012 Presidential Campaign in Verse.”  It’s a volume of poetry, concise but not terse.

Trillin was born and raised in Kansas City.  Discussion of politics is witty, and focuses less on Obama than it does on Mitty.

Related Event

Brain sculpture in Bloomington, Ind.
(via Flickr / Ali Eminov)

While it may be well established that our brains command our actions, it’s becoming increasingly clear that we can have greater control over the message.

Increasingly, research shows people can take steps to protect the health of their brain and as one aspect of that, may be able to sidetrack compulsive behaviors such as eating disorders.

The Missouri Eating Disorders Association is one agency which provides education, resources and advocacy to bring understanding and support to those treating or affected by the disease.

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