Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Alex Heuer

St. Louis on the Air Executive Producer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is the executive producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Illinois and worked for a few years at Iowa Public Radio. Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in 6 - 12th grade social studies. In 2016, he earned a Master of Public Policy Administration with a focus in nonprofit organization management and leadership from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

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Cuzin Grumpy's Pork Chop Revue is among the new acts featured in Circus Flora's 2018 season.
Circus Flora

For more than 30 years, Circus Flora, a one-ring circus that makes St. Louis its home, has offered a circus show that’s best described as live theater. It’s an intimate setting that is in stark contrast to the images some people might conjure of the large Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus which performed for the last time 10 months ago.

Two things are significantly different about this year’s Circus Flora season.

St. Louis Symphony music director David Robertson spoke about the 2015-16 season with "Cityscape" host Steve Potter.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

On May 6, David Robertson will raise his baton for the final time as music director of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra.

Coming to a close is Robertson’s 13-year tenure, highlighted by Grammy Award-winning recordings, national and international tours, and hundreds of concerts at Powell Hall.

Howard Weissman and Nichole Dawsey of NCADA
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The number of opioid-related deaths in the St. Louis region is poised to once again break a record.

Opioid-related deaths include overdoses on prescription painkillers, heroin and, increasingly, fentanyl - a prescription drug more potent than heroin that is often mixed with other substances.

In 2016, 712 people died due to opioids. That number is expected to be about 750 people in 2017, explained Howard Weissman, executive director of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (NCADA).

The Apollo 11 command module Columbia will be on display at the St. Louis Science Center.
Eric Long | National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

A treasure trove of invaluable artifacts from the space race will be on display at the St. Louis Science Center.

“Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission,” a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, opens Saturday in St. Louis.

The bibimbap bowl at VP Square is a dish from Sauce Magazine's 'Hit List' for April 2018.
Michelle Volansky | Sauce Magazine

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with our partners from Sauce Magazine about the best new restaurants to try during the month of April.

Joining him for the discussion were Catherine Klene and Matt Sorrell, managing editor and staff writer, respectively.

Gwen Moore is curator of urban landscape and community identity.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

The history of civil rights in St. Louis is compelling and complex.

More than 245,000 people have visited an exhibit at the Missouri History Museum detailing the area’s civil rights history. It closes April 15 after a 13-month run. 

“I think it tells us that people are really interested in St. Louis history and that they will turn out when you present that history to them,” explained Gwen Moore. “I think that we’ve done that in a very compelling way.”

St. Louis CPA Lance Weiss joined Don Marsh on Tuesday.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed what you need to know in advance of filing state and federal tax returns that must be postmarked by April 17.

Lance Weiss, a certified public accountant and partner with SFW Partners LLC in St. Louis, joined the program to answer listener questions about taxes – and provide an update on changes for the 2018 tax year after recently approved tax law changes.

Nicole Galloway poses for a portrait at St. Louis Public Radio. March, 22, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

“I am tough and I am thorough,” explained Nicole Galloway, Missouri’s state auditor.

Galloway, who joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday, detailed what her job entails, explained her ongoing audit of the City of St. Louis and addressed the mood in Jefferson City as Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy trial is set to get underway May 14.

Galloway’s audit of the City of St. Louis began a few months ago and will likely take several years. Part of the audit, Galloway explained, will be a review of development incentives.

Allison Miller and Jason Clay joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Over the past few years the world is producing 17 percent more food, yet one billion people go hungry.

That’s a conundrum that is the focus of a panel discussion Thursday night at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center titled, “The Future of Food in a Wealthier, Warmer World."

“It’s an interesting conundrum,” said Allison Miller, associate professor of biology at Saint Louis University. “We have a major challenge with feeding people but also conserving vibrant, healthy ecosystems.”

Andrew Potter (L), Gina Galati and Peter Scott Drackley joined host Don Marsh to talk about Winter Opera St. Louis’ final production of the season, “L’Elisir d’Amore.’
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

For more than 10 years, Winter Opera St. Louis has filled what once was a void in St. Louis’ opera scene – no opera performances during the winter months.

The professional company’s final production of the season is Gaetano Donizetti’s comic opera, “L’Elisir d’Amore.” The opera, which translates to English as “The Elixir of Love,” is about a poor villager (Nemorino) who buys a love potion from a traveling salesman (Dulcamera) after his attempts to woo a wealthy and beautiful woman (Adina) fail.

Former NPR CEO Ken Stern detailed his journey from regisitered Democrat to Republican to Independent.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Democrat. Republican. Independent.

Over the course of his life – and in that order – Ken Stern has identified politically as all three.

Stern, the former CEO of NPR, is in St. Louis participating in a discussion series Tuesday night at Washington University. He is author of the 2017 book, “Republican Like Me: How I Left the Liberal Bubble and Learned to Love the Right.”

Wayne Pratt | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis-based Centene Corporation found itself in a precarious situation this week when a BuzzFeed News investigation uncovered that a troubled compounding pharmacy the company now owns sold drugs used in executions to the state of Missouri.

Washington University history professor Peter Kastor uses the musical "Hamilton" as a jumping-off point to teach about the Founding Fathers.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s no secret that there’s a renewed interest in the role Alexander Hamilton played in founding the United States.

Portrayed in the Broadway musical “Hamilton,” the nation’s first treasury secretary and many of the Founding Fathers are brought to life by the show’s creator and star, Lin-Manuel Miranda.

In advance of the musical’s sold-out run in April at the Fox Theatre in St. Louis, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh talked with Peter Kastor, history professor at Washington University, about the historical accuracy of “Hamilton.”

Painter Junius Brutus Stearns, 1856 / via Wikimedia Commons

Encore Presentation: This program's original broadcast was on March 19, 2013.

Having existed and endured for nearly 230 years, the U.S. Constitution and the intent of those who created it continues to be a hotly contested topic.

On Monday's St. Louis on the Air during President's Day, host Don Marsh revisited his 2013 discussion with David Robertson, author of the book "The Original Compromise: What the Constitution's Framers Were Really Thinking." Robertson is a Curators' Teaching Professor of Political Science at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Scaffolding borders large interpretive floor art that traces the paths explorers and pioneers took westward from St. Louis.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Monday talked about renovations taking place at the Gateway Arch in advance of a planned reopening date of July 3.

Joining the discussion was Ryan McClure, director of communications and activation at the Gateway Arch Park Foundation. St. Louis on the Air producer Alex Heuer also joined the conversation.

Should the news media have published a story about Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ extramarital affair and his alleged blackmail of a woman?

As 2017 comes to an end, the team that brings you St. Louis on the Air decided to take a look at the top 20 most visited online stories of the year that came out of this program.

St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh spoke with senior producer Alex Heuer about some of the stories and larger trends.

A sculpture of Winston Churchill delivering his famous "Iron Curtain" speech.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Following World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, in 1946, delivered one of the most famous speeches of the 20th century. Known officially as the “Sinews of Peace,” Churchill’s speech came to be known as the “Iron Curtain” speech, and it foreshadowed the Cold War.

Flo Groberg was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2015 and is the author of the new book, "8 Seconds of Courage."
(Courtesy of the publisher)

An encore of this special St. Louis on the Air program airs Memorial Day, May 28, 2018.

Host Don Marsh talked with retired U.S. Army Captain Florent “Flo” Groberg, a recipient of the Medal of Honor and author of the new book, “8 Seconds of Courage: A Soldier’s Story from Immigrant to the Medal of Honor.”

The discussion was recorded on Tuesday, November 21 in the Community Room at UMSL at Grand Center, the home of St. Louis Public Radio and will air on Friday, November 24 at noon and 10 p.m.

Benjamin Moore of Fontbonne University holds a book with photos of Muslims who lost their lives during the Bosnian War. Moore runs the Bosnia Memory Project.
Tim Lloyd | St. Louis Public Radio

The guilty verdict on Wednesday of genocide and other war crimes against Ratko Mladic is reverberating throughout the world and particularly, within the Bosnian community in St. Louis.

About 70,000 Bosnians live in the St. Louis area. That’s the largest concentration of Bosnians anywhere in the world outside of Bosnia.

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