Alex Heuer

Talk Show Producer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air and Cityscape. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and then spent about four years as a reporter and producer at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. He is currently a graduate student at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and is pursuing a Master of Public Policy Administration. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Alex enjoys running, sailing, craft beer, locally-owned restaurants and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Ways To Connect

The cast of 'Afflicted: Daughters of Salem,' from left: Taylor Seward, Emily Jackoway, Alicia Smith, Jennifer Theby-Quinn, Samantha Moyer and Jacqueline Thompson.
Courtesy of the Metro Theater Company

In the spring of 1692, a group of young girls in Massachusetts spawned a wave of hysteria after accusing others of witchcraft. The accusations led to the Salem Witch Trials and the execution of more than a dozen people, mostly women.

Beginning Friday, Metro Theater Company and the Missouri History Museum present "Afflicted: Daughters of Salem," a play about the events that led to the Salem Witch Trials.

"Cityscape" host Steve Potter talked with Julia Flood, artistic director of Metro Theater Company, and playwright, Laurie Brooks.

Floris M. Oosterveld | Flickr | cropped

Selfie sticks. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, they’re here; and they seem to be getting more popular.

This week, the Smithsonian Institution — the world’s largest collection of museums, which includes the Air and Space Museum, Natural History Museum and Portrait Gallery — banned the use of selfie sticks.

Maggie Duckworth
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Maggie Duckworth is an electrical engineer and costume designer. She’s also the only St. Louis-area resident who’s still in the running for a one-way ticket to Mars.

Duckworth is a finalist for the Mars One mission to build a human colony on the Red Planet. Mars One is a Dutch nonprofit organization that plans to send humans to Mars by 2024. It will award 24 one-way tickets and Duckworth has made it through three rounds of cuts.

Psychologist Wes Crenshaw
Courtesy of Wes Crenshaw

Sex. That little three-letter word strikes fear in many parents’ hearts.

Psychologist Wes Crenshaw told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday that the biggest mistake parents make when trying to talk to their kids about sex is “freaking out.”

“Parents just cannot afford to think their kids are the least bit naïve. Kids are tied into the internet and to each other. They know way too much nowadays to take simple answers,” Crenshaw said. Rather than a one-time conversation, talking about sex and sex education is an almost endless conversation, he said.

(Courtesy: Missouri History Museum)

Today’s edition of StoryCorps, which aired during “Morning Edition,” was a remembrance of Max Starkloff, a pioneer in the disability rights movement who was quadriplegic. He died in 2010.

The StoryCorps conversation featured Starkloff’s wife, Colleen Starkloff, and their daughter, Meaghan Starkloff Breitenstein.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ yearlong 250th anniversary celebration will close Wednesday night with First Night in Grand Center.

As part of the festivities, a few STL250 cakes began arriving at the Public Media Commons on Monday morning. The Public Media Commons is located between St. Louis Public Radio and the Nine Network on Olive Street.

Santa's Arrival, an illustration for Clement Clarke Moore's poem.
Public Domain

You hear them year-round but can you identify the people behind the microphone?

We’ve taken Clement Clarke Moore’s classic poem, “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” most commonly known as "The Night Before Christmas," and had a different St. Louis Public Radio voice record each of the 14 verses.

Can you guess who they are in this multiple choice quiz?

 

(Courtesy: Linda Gurney)

Approximately 250 fiberglass cakes are scattered throughout the St. Louis region. They’re placed at notable locations to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the founding of St. Louis.

Sixty-seven of the cakes are part of an online auction that opened Monday and lasts through the end of the year. More may be added to the auction because each host location gets to choose what happens to their cake.

Meet Me in St. Louis
(Used with Permission / Missouri History Museum)

On Nov. 22, 1944, a throng of St. Louis theatergoers packed Loew’s State Theater on Washington Avenue for the world premiere of “Meet Me in St. Louis.” 

Although filmed elsewhere, the musical told the story of the Smith family as it struggled with the prospect of leaving St. Louis for New York in advance of the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.

Seventy years later, the film endures. Critic Roger Ebert once praised it as “one of the most artful, moving, and exquisitely designed musicals in film history.”

File photo

Early voting. Teacher Tenure. Sex Crime Trial Rules. Gubernatorial Budgetary Power.

Those are some of the topics before Missouri voters on Nov. 4.

“St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh talked with St. Louis Public Radio reporters Marshall Griffin and Tim Lloyd about the proposed constitutional amendments.

Here’s a recap of Amendments 2, 3 and 6.

Pages