Caitlin Lally | St. Louis Public Radio

Caitlin Lally

Talk Show Intern

Caitlin Lally is thrilled to join St. Louis Public Radio as the summer production intern for "St. Louis on the Air." With a bachelor's degree in journalism from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Caitlin also freelances for area publications like Sauce Magazine and the Belleville News-Democrat. In her career, she's covered topics such as Trump's travel ban, political protests and community activism. When she's not producing audio segments or transcribing interviews, Caitlin enjoys practicing yoga, seeing live music, and cooking plant-based meals.

Left, Caryn Dugan and Dr. James Loomis discussed plant-based diets with host Don Marsh on Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

While in 2014 just 1 percent of U.S. consumers claimed to be vegan, in 2017, about 6 percent made that claim. With a 600 percent increase in just three years, and veg-friendly options becoming more commonplace in St. Louis, it is safe to say that this diet trend is not just a fad – it’s here to stay.

Tom Murray and Ed Reggi joined host Don Marsh to discuss the opening of “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Opening the curtain on themes such as forbidden love and secret identities, Oscar Wilde’s “The Importance of Being Earnest, A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” opens Thursday in Grand Center.

This classic farcical comedy set in 1890s London follows the lives of two friends using the same alias, “Ernest,” for their clandestine activities. “At the core of this play, it’s really about who are we in public versus who are we in private,” Ed Reggi said on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.

From left, Kelly Sopek, Julie Zimmermann and Payne Gray spoke with host Don Marsh about their recent anthropological work at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Long before Lewis and Clark passed through the Gateway to the West, this region was home to indigenous Americans including the Cahokians.

While this civilization was primarily located about 15 minutes east of St. Louis at today’s Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, settlements were scattered across the region including the area that is now Edwardsville.

Travel writer, radio personality and avid road tripper Bill Clevlen spoke with host Don Marsh on Monday’s "St. Louis on the Air."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

From a vacuum cleaner museum to the world’s tallest mailbox, the United States is abundant with unique destinations.

“These are things you’re only going to be able to do in America,” Bill Clevlen said, on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, about the destinations in his first travel book. Inspired by his own hobby of road tripping and a desire to spread uplifting stories, Clevlen shares his experiences in “100 Things to Do in America Before You Die.”

"Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" is one of the series discussed in Weitekamp's presentation at the St. Louis Science Center Friday evening.
via Flickr | Marcin Wichary

On the first Friday of every month, the St. Louis Science Center welcomes adults to take a look at the reality behind science fiction. This month’s event highlights two staples in popular culture: Star Trek and Babylon 5.

Doris Fiddmont Frazier, center, and other parishioners worship at Union Baptist Church, a fixture in Westland Acres.
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Those familiar with St. Louis neighborhoods are probably also familiar with the concept of gentrification. The latest episode of the We Live Here podcast, “Paved over Histories”, tackles this issue with its eye on the west St. Louis County community of Westland Acres.

Executive director of Healing Action Katie Rhoades shared her own experience of human trafficking on Tuesday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Aaron Doerr | St. Louis Public Radio

Human trafficking remains a problem throughout the world, but it is closer to home than we often realize.

“It’s a tremendous issue here in Missouri,” Missouri State Highway Patrol Captain Norman Murphy said regarding both sexual and labor exploitation.

Left, Matt Sorrell, David Sandusky and Otis Walker ignite a conversation about barbecue with host Don Marsh on Monday’s “St. Louis on the Air.”
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis on the Air

For the backyard barbecuer ready to light up the grill for the Fourth of July, there’s no need to stress about which method or recipe is best.

“You can have a guy driving a Corvette, and another guy out here driving a Mustang, but if you can’t drive, it doesn’t make no difference,” Otis Walker said making an analogy for various barbecuing methods on Monday’s St. Louis on the Air.

James Boldt is the general chairman of Fair St. Louis 2018.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Fair St. Louis is bringing fireworks and free music back to the Gateway Arch next week. After being held at Forest Park for four years due to construction, the $380 million renovations on the Arch and the surrounding park are complete just in time for this year’s Fourth of July festivities.

Left, Richard Quinn and Alicia Corder spoke with host Don Marsh about the FBI’s efforts to diversify its agents on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis on the Air

While attending Indiana State to become a surgeon, Alicia Corder took a criminal justice class and her entire life plan changed.

“It’s not anything I had considered before,” she said describing a time she heard from an FBI agent about their work. “But there was something about the way he spoke about the people he worked with and the mission he served, and his passion and dedication to it that I was absolutely struck by it. And the next week, I went and changed my major and ended up going to law school and geared everything after that to becoming an agent.”

Bill Freivogel, Barbara Smith and Greg Magarian joined host Don Marsh for Tuesday’s Legal Roundtable segment.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis on the Air

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with a panel of legal experts regarding the recent activity in the U.S. Supreme Court as the session comes to an end.

On the panel:

From left, Steph Perkins, Curtis Galloway and Emily Klamer joined Don Marsh for a discussion about LGBTQ mental health.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis on the Air

While LGBTQ Pride Month is typically a time for celebration among the local queer community, mourning has also marked this year’s observance as several St. Louis-area residents have died by suicide and overdose in the wake of national news of celebrity deaths.

“The numbers of suicide attempts and LGBTQ people taking their own lives is something like nine times the rate for trans people and three times the rate of the national average for LGB people, and it’s very much increased by victimization and discrimination that we face every day,” Steph Perkins said on Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air.

Bill Littlefield, host of the Boston-based NPR sports program “Only A Game,” will retire this summer.
Alex Kinsgubury | WBUR

For 25 years, Bill Littlefield has brought insightful commentary and thoughtful narratives surrounding the sports world to NPR listeners’ ears every Saturday morning. But in July, the host of the program “Only A Game” will retire from WBUR in Boston.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with Littlefield about his long career, the landscape of American sports today and the crossover between that realm and politics.

From left, Carol Swartout Klein and Joan Lipkin hold a poster for the play "26 Pebbles."
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Drawing inspiration from a dark place, playwright Eric Ulloa created a theater production that highlights the issue of gun violence in the United States.

After 20 first graders and six school teachers were murdered at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, Ulloa visited the recovering community of Newtown, Connecticut and collected more than 60 interviews, ultimately weaving them into a play titled “26 Pebbles.”

From left, Bob Baker, John Larson and Ken Haller joined host Don Marsh on Thursday's episode about improvisation.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis on the Air

Improvisation is a skill often associated with jazz music or comedy. But on Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with three individuals who use it in their daily lives.

Bob Baker, John Larson and Ken Haller joined Marsh to discuss the quirky talent.

While some may have the notion that improv artists just “wing it,” Baker, founder and director of the Improv Comedy Cabaret, said there is actually a framework that exists when improvising.

Rev. F. Willis Johnson on "St. Louis on the Air"
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

After serving his community in Ferguson for more than seven years and emerging as a leader following the killing of Michael Brown in 2014, Rev. F. Willis Johnson is being transplanted to Columbus, Ohio, where he will grow a new church.

Johnson was the pastor of Wellspring Church in downtown Ferguson until it recently closed. He is also the co-founder/director of the Center for Social Empowerment and author of “Holding Up Your Corner: Talking About Race in Your Community.” On Tuesday, Johnson joined host Don Marsh on St. Louis on the Air to discuss his time in St. Louis.

The latest "We Live Here" episode features an interview with the author of “Color of Law,” Richard Rothstein.
Stefan Steinbauer | Unsplash

Segregation in housing is a reality in metro areas all over the country, and St. Louis is far from an exception.

On Thursday’s episode of St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with We Live Here co-host/producer Kameel Stanley about the podcast’s latest episode “The Segregation Myth-buster.” The episode features an interview with the author of “Color of Law,” Richard Rothstein, who breaks down the fact that segregation is not some sort of anomaly, but rather it is imposed very purposefully through means of government institutions and policies.

The Boathouse in Forest Park is one new restaurant featured on this month's Hit List.
Michelle Volansky | Sauce Magazine

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, two staff members from Sauce Magazine joined host Don Marsh to talk about new restaurants in and around Forest Park, as well as their favorite patios.

Julia Lacher, Clayvon Wesley and Patrick Allie joined host Don Marsh to talk about an oral history project collecting veterans' voices.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Oral storytelling is an age-old tradition that the Missouri Historical Society is making the most of when it comes to sharing veterans’ personal experiences. While construction is finishing up downtown at Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, an oral-history project is currently underway that will soon highlight the detailed accounts of 30 veterans from the St. Louis area.