Don Marsh

Host

Don Marsh has extensive and broad media experience, with a career beginning in 1959. Starting as a managing editor for a small magazine in New Jersey, he went on to become a radio news writer in Germany; an Eastern European correspondent and bureau chief for the American Forces Network; news director at WJZ-TV in Baltimore; anchorman/political specialist reporter/producer at KTVI-TV in St. Louis; a talk show host for KMOX radio; an anchorman for KDNL-TV; and a producer of training videos for law enforcement. He began as host of St. Louis Public Radio’s St. Louis on the Air in September 2005. His many professional awards include 12 Regional Emmy Awards, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Don was inducted into the STL Hall of Fame in 2014. In 2015, he was named STL Media Person of the Year and also received an honorary doctorate from the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Alex Heuer

Krista Tippett challenges listeners each week to explore the questions at the center of human life with her program “On Being.”  While examining religion, meaning, ethics, and ideas, she talks with a wide variety of guests representing many faiths, cultures and professions.    

Digging out of an economic crisis can be a lot more complicated than getting in to one and can take a lot more time, too.  While there are positive signs that we are climbing out of the recession, there is still considerable fallout, especially for young couples and recent college grads. 

Jobs are still hard to find for newcomers in the job market and college debt is overwhelming for many. The housing market decline, and resulting loss of wealth, was especially painful for young home owners. 

(via Flickr/jtbrennan)

Synesthesia is a complex and rare condition in which input from one sense is perceived through another sense.

The abilities of people to see what they hear or hear what they see are just two examples.

A significant amount of research into the condition is being conducted at the University of Missouri–St. Louis.

"St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh spoke with UMSL philosophy professor Brit Brogaard and with UMSL philosophy graduate student Kristian Marlow, who participated in the research.

Also joining the program were two synesthetes:

© Joan Marcus

The first national tour of Priscilla Queen of the Desert - The Musical has made its way to the Fabulous Fox Theatre in St. Louis.

The musical features a trio of friends who take a road trip aboard a battered bus throughout the Australian outback.  Along the way, the three drag queens from Sydney encounter episodes of discrimination and heartbreak.

Priscilla Queen of the Desert - The Musical opens with “It’s Raining Men” and has other disco favorites, as well as songs such as “Material Girl” and “MacArthur Park.”

(Courtesy: Rally St. Louis)

Today on St. Louis on the Air at 11:00 a.m. Updated 11:28 a.m.

Rally St. Louis is a unique crowdsourcing and crowd-funding project designed as a grassroots movement to improve and better market the region.

In mid-November the Rally St. Louis platform launched, allowing people to submit their idea.  In December, the public voted for their favorite idea among the hundreds submitted.

(Courtesy: Andrew Theising / Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)

The citizens of East St. Louis once believed their town was destined for greatness.  They thought the town was poised to outdistance Chicago as the premier industrial giant and railroad freight node of the Midwest.

According to Andrew Theising, political scientist at the Institute for Urban Research at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and series editor of the East St. Louis Sesquicentennial series, “In the 19th century residents really did think it would be the new Pittsburgh. (Early) documents are just gushing with civic pride.”

Tim Bommel, Mo. House Communications

Governor Jay Nixon, on Monday night, delivered the first State of the State Address of his second term.

He discussed a broad range of topics which included education, Medicaid, mental health and domestic violence.  An in-depth breakdown of his speech as well as reaction from House Speaker Tim Jones is available here.

(Courtesy: St. Louis City Circuit Attorney's Office)

In the early 1980s, University City resident George Allen was charged with and convicted of raping and murdering court reporter Mary Bell.

Last year, after serving 30 years in prison, Allen was released from prison as new evidence came to light which could have helped Allen’s defense and which a judge ruled made his trial unfair.

The University of Missouri – St. Louis kicks off its Golden Jubilee year with a celebration on February 1.  Chancellor Tom George was Don Marsh’s guest on “St. Louis on the Air” to reflect on the university’s growth in its first half-century as well as to discuss trends and challenges in higher education.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

When the 2012 crime statistics were reported last week, there was good news in both St. Louis City and the portion of St. Louis County patrolled by St. Louis County Police. 

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

In the mid-1800s Elizabeth Keckley was a slave living in St. Louis.

As a highly skilled dressmaker, she was eventually able to earn the money to buy her freedom.

New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Chiaverini is the author of a new book about Elizabeth Keckley.  She writes about Keckley moving from St. Louis to Washington D.C. and becoming First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln’s personal dressmaker.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Erin Williams talked with Chiaverini about her new book, “Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker.”

Flickr |neil conway

Earlier this week, prompted by the mass school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, President Barack Obama announced a series of measures aimed at curbing gun violence.

Among the proposals is increasing access to mental health care.

All too often access to mental health care is scarce.  Sometimes, the only place people can get care is if they are arrested and charged with a crime.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

For the first time in a long time, no member of the Carnahan family is holding public office in Missouri.

Secretary of State Robin Carnahan left office earlier this week after deciding not to seek re-election last November.  Her brother, Congressman Russ Carnahan (MO – 3), served four terms in the U.S. House of Representatives.  After re-districting, he challenged Congressman Lacy Clay in the Democratic primary and was unsuccessful.

Sean Sandefur

Leonard Slatkin has strong ties to St. Louis. His father, conductor and violinist Felix Slatkin, was born in St. Louis and joined the St. Louis Symphony when he was still a teen.  The younger Slatkin’s first conducting position with a major symphony orchestra came in 1968 when he was named Assistant Conductor of the St.

(St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department)

Sam Dotson is the new chief of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

He comes to the position after spending about twenty years with the Department.

Dotson joined host Don Marsh for a wide-ranging discussion.  They talked about taking the reins of the St. Louis Police Department as it prepares to transition to local control and about making the force one which is fully up to speed on 21st century policing practices.

SK Films

Citizen science is a growing opportunity for non-professional and amateur scientists to participate in professional research.

There are numerous opportunities for citizen science in the St. Louis area and engaging in such endeavors can contribute to protecting environments and preserving species.

(Photo Courtesy: University of Missouri - St. Louis)

A leading advocate for equal rights argues infant mortality, access to education, and unemployment remain major issues of inequality in the African American community.

Julianne Malveaux is a labor economist, author and political commentator.  She is also the former President of Bennett College, a historically black college for women in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Host Don Marsh talked with Malveaux in advance of her speech at the University of Missouri – St. Louis to commemorate the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

Health issues often become more prominent as people age.  Many of them are avoided or at least postponed; and much of living healthfully has more to do with attitude than it does medicine.

Host Don Marsh talked with geriatrician Dr. John Morley, who is Director of the Division of Geriatric Medicine at Saint Louis University’s School of Medicine.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri legislature convenes this Wednesday.

The hallmark issue may be Medicaid expansion.  Topics of tax credits and arming classroom teachers are also expected to come up for debate.

Host Don Marsh talked with St. Louis Public Radio’s statehouse reporter Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Beacon political reporter Jo Mannies, and University of Missouri – St. Louis political science professor Terry Jones about the upcoming session.

Wikimedia Commons / Andreas Praefcke

The St. Louis Consular Corps helps citizens of other countries with a variety of issues including obtaining visas, medical emergencies, exchange student programs, and deaths.

At any one time there are thousands of foreign nationals living and visiting the St. Louis area.

Host Don Marsh talked with John A. Wright, Board President of the St. Louis Consular Corps and Honorary Consul of Senegal, and Lansing G. Hecker, Honorary Consul of Germany.

Alex Monti Fox

When Stefania Silvestri was 14 years old and living in Chesterfield, her father, who was 48 years old, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

At that time Silvestri, her mother, and two sisters became caregivers.

Host Don Marsh talked with Silvestri about her struggle at such a young age and how her father progressed into more severe forms of dementia.  Her memoir is, “Beside the Mountain: Finding Strength and Courage Through My Father's Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease.”

(Courtesy: Charles D'Angelo)

Resolutions are a ubiquitous part of the ‘New Year’ and losing weight and adopting a healthier lifestyle are some of the most common.

Host Don Marsh talked with “St. Louis weight loss guru” Charles D’Angelo.  He is the author of “Think and Grow Thin.”

“I could have been the king of excuses,” said D’Angelo, who as a high school junior, weighed 360 pounds.  He decided that he needed to change his life and in two years, lost 160 pounds.

From proponents of local control of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department to the success of the St. Louis Cardinals, it was a “good year” for many St. Louis people, places, and ideas.

Host Don Marsh talked with a panel of guests as we continue our “A Good Year” series.

The guests included:

  • Alex Ihnen, Editor of nextSTL.com
  • Rabbi Mark Shook, Senior Rabbi Emeritus, Congregation Temple Israel
  • Alvin Reid, Host at 101 ESPN, Nine Network “Donneybrook” Panelist
Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

On this last day of 2012, Congress and the President have yet to reach a deal about how to avert going over the fiscal cliff.

Host Don Marsh talked with St. Louis Beacon Washington D.C. Correspondent Rob Koenig for a brief conversation about the latest news on the negotiations.

(Courtesy: DA CAPO PRESS)

St. Louis is home to one of the country’s great urban parks.

Forest Park encompasses more than 1,300 acres and in addition to walking, running and bike trails, it includes institutions such as The Muny, Missouri History Museum, Saint Louis Zoo and Saint Louis Science Center.

While he didn’t design Forest Park, landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted did design New York City’s Central Park, Stanford University in California and the Capitol Grounds in Washington, D.C.

Pages