Emanuele Berry

Emanuele Berry is a 2012 graduate of Michigan State University. Prior to coming to St. Louis she worked as a talk show producer at WKAR Public Radio in Michigan. Emanuele also interned at National Public Radio, where she worked at the Arts and Information Desk. Her work has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters, the Society of Professional Journalists, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

Email: eberry@stlpublicradio.org

Anna Crosslin
Courtesy of the Intentional Institute

Picking up your roots in one country and moving to a land with different customs and language is a daunting prospect. That story is not unfamiliar to Anna Crosslin, president and CEO of the International Institute of St. Louis.  

“I am a Japanese American and have grown up with my foot in two cultures. So what I have done for a living has been very grounded in what my personal mission has been, which has been building bridges between two worlds,” Crosslin said.

Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Thirty people from different corners of the globe gathered together to share in the same experience Friday: Becoming a U.S. citizen.

The naturalization ceremony was held at the International Institute of St. Louis. It was the first ceremony held at the institute's new location on Arsenal Street in south city. The International Institute moved into the building, which is four times larger than its previous location, earlier this year.

Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

Many gathered to speak for and against Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III at Tuesday night's Ferguson City Council meeting. Earlier in the day, reports surfaced that a petition to recall the mayor would be turned into the city clerk and presented to the council at the meeting. However, the petition was never filed.

(From Left) Seckman Senior High School Kyle Edwards, Hazelwood East seniors Justin Mason and Teanna Bass pushed their tables together and created the winning idea for bridging racial divides in St. Louis.
Tim Lloyd | St. Louis Public Radio

 

Many schools in the St. Louis Region are wrapping  up their last few weeks of class. For some  the school year was shaped by the August shooting death of Michael Brown, an incident which left many students and adults wondering how they could bridge the racial divide in the region. One solution a group of students came up with: a school exchange program.

VonDerrit Myers' mother, Syreeta Myers, speaks with reporters following the announcement that charges will not be filled against the officer who killed her son.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

 St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce has released her report in the fatal shooting of VonDerrit Myers Jr. by an off-duty police officer. It concluded “that Mr. Myers produced a firearm on the evening in question," and that “Given all the available facts, witness statements, physical and forensic evidence and for reasons outlined in the detailed report, prosecutors have determined a criminal violation could not be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Joyce said although the circumstances were tragic, the incident did not constitute a crime under Missouri law. 

Paul Sableman via flicker

You hear it nearly every time you watch a crime show. As the bad guy is getting cuffed by the police, they tell him that he has the right to remain silent. And "Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law." And they tell him he has the right to an attorney. If he cannot afford to hire a lawyer, "one will be appointed to represent you..."

As with most things you see on TV, it's not actually that easy. In this episode of We Live Here, we explore the price and perils of our public defender system.

Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

 An unarmed black man has an encounter with police and ends up dead. The incident is followed by peaceful protests then violence and police in riot gear, fire, looting and media trucks.

Last August this was Ferguson. This week it’s Baltimore.

Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

For young Bosnians in St. Louis, trying to make sense of their identity can be a complex task.

Laura Kromják, an International Visiting Fellow at Saint Louis University, says the younger generation of the St. Louis’ Bosnian community is trying to understand themselves as both Bosnian and American.

From bottom left: St. Louis area residents Bala Anant, Will Johnson, Derrick Hopgood and his daughter Skylyn. Anne Cody, Lisa Heimberger and Brandy Bold.
Photo of Gateway Arch from Francisco Diez | Flickr, additional photos from Joseph Leahy and Kaitlyn Petrin / St. Louis Public Radio

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Let’s be honest, talking about race can be tough — even nerve-racking for some.  

Often the conversation comes with trap doors leading to potentially awkward moments. It’s that fear of a misstep, perhaps, that nudges people into sidestepping clear language about race.

Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

A new program at the International Institute of St. Louis is helping immigrant professionals build job skills and advance their careers.The Career Advancement for International Professionals encourages immigrants like Tairou Goura not to abandon their professional ambitions.

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