Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Evie Hemphill

Talk Show Producer

Evie Hemphill joined the St. Louis on the Air team in February 2018. After earning a bachelor’s degree in English literature in 2005, she started her career as a reporter for the Westminster Window in Colorado. Several years later she went on to pursue graduate work in creative writing at the University of Wyoming and moved to St. Louis upon earning an MFA in the spring of 2010. She worked as writer and editor for Washington University Libraries until 2014 and then spent several more years in public relations for the University of Missouri–St. Louis before making the shift to St. Louis Public Radio.

When she’s not helping to produce the talk show, Evie can typically be found navigating the city sans car, volunteering for St. Louis BWorks or trying to get the majority of the dance steps correct as a member of the Thunder & Lightning Cloggers of Southern Illinois. She’s married to Joe, cat-mom to Dash and rather obsessive about doubt, certitude and the places where refuge and risk intersect.

Classical musicians (from left) Terrance Patterson, Ann Hobson Pilot and Demarre McGill discussed the presence of African-Americans in the genre and how they’ve seen that presence slowly grow over the course of their careers.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Fewer than 2 percent of musicians in professional orchestras in the U.S. are African-American, and the Florida-based Ritz Chamber Players are eager to change that.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, three members of the all-black ensemble talked with host Don Marsh about the presence of African-Americans in the genre and how they’ve seen that presence slowly grow over the course of their careers.

David Cunningham, a professor of sociology at Washington University, discussed the recent slowdown in the growth of hate groups in the U.S. as well as the concurrent increase in the number of hate crimes occurring in the country since November 2016.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Nearly doubling since 1999, the long-growing number of hate groups active within the United States has remained nearly static since the election of President Donald Trump. Meanwhile, the number of hate crimes is rising, and at first glance the two concurrent trends might seem contradictory.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Washington University sociologist David Cunningham to help make sense of the data.

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