Jason Rosenbaum

Innovation Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University.

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On the Trail
11:54 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Is Smaller Better? Multitude Of Municipalities Plays Into City-County Merger Debate

Charlie Giraud moved to Greendale, Missouri, in the mid-2000s. While town's tiny size wasn't a factor in his decision, he says there's plenty to like about the north St. Louis County village.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Greendale is home to about 700 people in north St. Louis County. The primarily residential community features stately brick houses along seven, well-maintained streets. The town’s city hall consists of two rooms inside an office building. It contracts with nearby Normandy for police service. Its big-ticket expenditures include cleaning streets and trimming trees.

Charlie Giraud found a lot to like. He’s lived in bigger St. Louis County municipalities like Ballwin and University City. He appreciated Greendale’s friendly neighbors, racial diversity and close-knit community.

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Crestwood Mall
4:54 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Crestwood Court Sells At Auction For $3.65 Million

Crestwood Court closed for business in 2013.
Credit Wikipedia

A shuttered St. Louis County mall has a new owner. 

The defunct Crestwood Court sold for $3.65 million on Auctions.com on Thursday afternoon. It came to that final price after a starting bid of $1 million.

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Politics & Issues
2:55 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Politically Speaking: Rep. Kelly Talks About Tax Cuts, Crime And Bonds

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

This week, the Politically Speaking podcast team – Chris McDaniel, Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies – host state Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia, currently the longest-serving member of the state House.

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes now.

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Public Transportation
4:00 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Judge Orders Ride-Share 'Lyft' To Stop Service

Lyft's cars often have pink mustaches on them. The San Francisco-based company is facing pushback from the regional taxi commission.
Credit Courtesy of Lyft

(Updated at 4 p.m., Mon., April 21)

A St. Louis judge has told a new ride share service that it must halt its operation in the city and county.

The St. Louis Metropolitan Taxi Cab Commission sued "Lyft" last week for entering the region’s market without registering.

Lyft allows customers to summon drivers using an app on their cell phones. Once the ride is over, customers pay the driver through credit card information stored within the application.

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UMSL
4:48 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

New Sculpture Highlights North County Redevelopment Efforts

Catherine Magel's "Changing Identities"
Credit Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

The unveiling of Catherine Magel’s “Changing Identities” sculpture as a poignant moment for Normandy Mayor Patrick Green. 

The unveiling showcases a community development organization for the municipalities surrounding the University of Missouri-St. Louis. But it was also a tribute to four people who died in a 1997 bus crash in north St. Louis County.

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Northside Regeneration
5:24 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

McKee Gets Extension to Pay Northside Regeneration Project Legal Fees

Paul McKee won a brief extension to pay the city legal fees.
Credit Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee has two weeks to reimburse the city of St. Louis for legal fees associated with his Northside Regeneration project. 

The city’s Board of Estimate and Apportionment voted Wednesday to give McKee until April 30 to pay approximately $57,000 in legal fees. That money is associated with a roughly three-year legal battle over McKee's proposal to redevelop portions of north St. Louis.

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Politically Speaking
5:14 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Politically Speaking: Sen. Silvey Discusses His Vision For Medicaid

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

After cruising on the Rhine in Germany for the past couple of weeks, Jo Mannies rejoins Jason Rosenbaum and Chris McDaniel for the podcast.

Note: You can subscribe to us on iTunes now.

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Scott Air Force Base
4:50 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Illinois Senators Continue Push To Showcase Scott Air Force Base

U.S. Sens. Mark Kirk and Dick Durbin speak to reporters Tuesday at Scott Air Force Base.
Credit Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

The Air Force's top civilian official spent Tuesday morning at Scott Air Force Base with Illinois' political leaders. 

U.S. Sens. Dick Durbin and Mark Kirk were among the officials who showed Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James around the Metro East military installation. It was the first time James visited the base since being confirmed by the U.S. Senate late last year. Illinois Lt. Gov. Shelia Simon, St. Clair County Board Chairman Mark Kern and Madison County Board Chairman Alan Dunstan were also on hand for James' visit.

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Chesterfield
11:22 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

This Is Chesterfield: "Bedroom" Community Experiences Business Boom

A sculpture of a horse rests in front of Chesterfield City Hall.
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Chesterfield received plenty of attention recently when it snagged two high-profile festivals away from the city of St. Louis. But the hubbub over the Taste of St. Louis and Bluesweek’s exodus may be part of a larger story. 

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On the Trail
11:20 pm
Sun April 13, 2014

Five Questions To Ask In Legislative Session's Waning Weeks

With about a month left before legislators adjourn, some key story lines still haven't reached a conclusion.
Credit UPI/Bill Greenblatt

With roughly a month left to go before adjournment, many of the Missouri General Assembly’s big issues remain unresolved.  

That’s not too surprising. Big-ticket legislation often passes — or dies — in the last weeks of the session. With about a month to go before the final gavel falls, legislation dealing with tax cuts, the state’s criminal code and the student transfer situation are all still up in the air.

The resolution of some conflicts could hinge on unity from Republicans, who control the legislature, while others may fall along less predictable fault lines. 

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