Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the enticing world of professional journalism in the mid-2000s, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and in the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis City with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. Their son, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum, was born in February 2014.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Since the Missouri General Assembly adjourned on Friday, Gov. Jay Nixon hasn’t made much headway on the tall stack of bills awaiting his consideration.

Gov. Jay Nixon talks to reporters after RGA's groundbreaking ceremony in Chesterfield.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Missouri House convened Thursday, legislators looked up to see a spooky sight: a life-size human “body” lying atop the chamber’s huge skylight.

The “body” turned out to be a paper cutout placed on the roof as a joke.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri General Assembly has ended. The legislature has approved some consequential bills -- and left others unattended. As we count down to the end of the session on Friday, this list will be updated to reflect legislation that’s passed -- or passed on.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Hours before adjournment for the year, a state Senate filibuster appears to have killed a tax credit package that had won approval from the House just a couple hours earlier.

The package had been assembled by House and Senate conferees late Thursday and approved by leaders in both chambers.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Now in his third year in the Missouri Senate, state Sen. John Lamping hasn’t had much of a reputation for filibustering.

But that changed Tuesday when the Ladue Republican took a leading role in filibustering a one-cent sales tax increase for transportation. His opposition played a big role in derailing – at least for the time being – a measure sponsored by State Sen. Mike Kehoe and supported by a wide range of interest groups.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Two Democratic U.S. senators condemned the Internal Revenue Service's targeting of conservative groups for stricter review as "un-American" and "absolutely unacceptable."

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill added that high-ranking IRS officials should be fired if they knew what was happening.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley gave his "100 percent" support to giving Sylvan Springs Park to the federal government to expand Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The effort in the Missouri legislature to abolish local foreclosure mediation ordinances, such as those in St. Louis and St. Louis County, had all the right kind of legislative momentum.

State Rep. Stanley Cox and House Majority John Diehl's legislation had unchallenged support from Republican legislators. It was a major priority for the state's banking and real estate industry, two powerful and influential interest groups that opposed the ordinances in St. Louis County and St. Louis. And some Democratic legislators in the Missouri House supported it.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon indicated Friday that he had serious misgivings about a broad-based tax cut bill that the Missouri General Assembly has sent to his desk.

But Nixon, a Democrat, stopped short of saying whether he would sign or veto the measure, which was crafted to compete with neighboring states, such as Kansas, that have aggressively cut taxes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri lawmakers finished work on the bills that encompass the state's budget, sending the 2014 fiscal year plan to Gov. Jay Nixon a day before a mandated deadline.

But the bills passed by the legislature include several provisions that have raised the governor's ire, including partial funding of the Department of Revenue's Division of Motor Vehicles.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri House approved wide-reaching legislation cutting personal income, corporate and business taxes, sending the measure to Gov. Jay Nixon for consideration.

The House passed state Sen. Eric Schmitt's legislation, SB 253, Thursday by a vote of 103-51. That vote came a day after the Missouri Senate passed the bill by a vote of 24-9 and sent it to the House. Now Nixon will have to consider whether to sign or veto the bill.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Jay Nixon announced Wednesday that he would reduce staff and services at the Division of Motor Vehicles if the General Assembly passes a budget funding two-thirds of its fiscal year budget.

But the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee said such a move is unnecessary -- and added that the legislature needs to pursue its plan to  force the agency to change how it issues driver's licenses.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Cherokee Street developed a reputation in recent years as a creative and cultural hotspot, buoyed by a diverse and eclectic mix of businesses.

But while many are optimistic about the business district's future, some feel it needs to be more responsive to residents in surrounding neighborhoods.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri Senate sent legislation to Gov. Jay Nixon aimed at abolishing the foreclosure mediation ordinances in St. Louis County and St. Louis, constituting a major blow to the programs.

State Rep. Stanley Cox, R-Sedalia, and House Majority Leader John Diehl, R-Town and Country, sponsored legislation to “pre-empt” foreclosure mediation programs in counties or cities.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Nicole Cortes felt the "pull" of Cherokee Street when she was looking for a home.

Cortes, an immigration attorney with the Migrant and Immigrant Community Action Project, said she was attracted to "the diversity and the eclectic mix of small businesses" in the south St. Louis commercial hub. She was also heartened by the area's affordable property — and demographic diversity.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: During the waning days of April, reports surfaced that a defeated Missouri Republican was seriously considering an electoral comeback after time away from public life.

No, it wasn't former U.S. Rep. Todd Akin. It was Bob Onder, a former state representative from Lake St. Louis who fell short nearly five years ago in the hotly contested 9th congressional district Republican primary.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Tempers flared at a meeting of the Ellisville City Council after an attempt to overturn former Mayor Adam Paul’s removal from office was stifled.

And supporters of the former mayor expressed blistering criticism about the growing costs to the city to defend the mayor's removal from office.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: State Sen. John Lamping is no stranger to challenging conventional wisdom about Missouri politics.

Since he entered the Missouri Senate in 2011, the Ladue Republican has introduced bills to shorten the legislative session, have the governor and lieutenant governor run as a ticket and curtail political contributions from tax credit recipients.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The sponsor of vetoed legislation allowing some counties and municipalities to collect sales tax on certain vehicle purchases says he will not attempt to persuade the General Assembly to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s objection.

Instead, state Sen. Mike Kehoe, R-Jefferson City, says he will work to pass an alternative to satisfy Nixon’s concerns. In his veto message last week, Nixon cited problems with the bill’s language.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: State Rep. Joshua Peters could have waited his turn to run for elected office. But the 25-year-old instead decided to join a growing crop of young Missourians who felt the “fierce urgency of now.”

After a few years of toiling behind the scenes in Jefferson City and Washington, D.C., Peters won a special election earlier this month to represent the north St. Louis 76th District in the Missouri House. He was sworn into office Wednesday.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Former Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul promised earlier this month that he would go to a "real court" to try and get his job back.

Paul proved true to his word.

This rendering of the "Riverfront Era" story zone in the new Arch museum shows how the Old Rock House facade (left center) will be incorporated.
Courtesy CityArchRiver Foundation

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - The leaders of an effort to refurbish the grounds around the Gateway Arch say that the project is on track to be finished in time for the monument’s 50th birthday.

At CityArchRiver 2015’s report to the community, representatives from the public-private partnership joined representatives from the National Parks Services, the Missouri Department of Transportation, Great Rivers Greenway and Haley Sharpe Design to update the $380 million project. Several hundred people watched the presentation at the Ferrara theater in downtown St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: After being sworn in for a historic fourth term, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay pledged to pursue his work with “hope – and with a sense of great urgency.”

Both Slay and St. Louis Comptroller Darlene Green were sworn in on Tuesday for four-year terms. Slay made history earlier this month when he won the general election to a fourth four-year term. 

Slay effectively won his latest term in March when he defeated St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmy Matthews. He then easily won his general election campaign over Green Party nominee James McNeely.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The leaders of an effort to refurbish the grounds around the Gateway Arch say that the project is on track to be finished in time for the monument’s 50th birthday.

At CityArchRiver 2015’s report to the community, representatives from the public-private partnership joined representatives from the National Parks Services, the Missouri Department of Transportation, Great Rivers Greenway and Haley Sharpe Design to update the $380 million project. Several hundred people watched the presentation at the Ferrara theatre in downtown St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The director of the Missouri Department of Revenue has resigned his post, a move that comes as the agency’s actions have drawn widespread fire in the Missouri General Assembly.

Gov. Jay Nixon’s office announced on Monday afternoon that DOR director Brian Long resigned his post effective immediately. No reason was given. Nixon, a Democrat, named John Mollenkamp – the agency's deputy director – as acting director of the department.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When Chris Koster first ran for attorney general in 2008, the phrase "Koster the Imposter" was thrown around as commonly as promises to be tough on crime.

That's because Koster had made the unusual move of switching political parties. Some Missouri Democrats contended that Koster was an opportunist who didn't believe in the party's beliefs or principles. Consequently, Koster barely won a heated Democratic primary over state Reps. Margaret Donnelly and Jeff Harris, a contest in which his political convictions and Democratic credentials were constantly under attack.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Attorney General Chris Koster won’t appeal a federal court decision striking down a new state law that allows employers to exclude contraception, abortion or sterilization from insurance coverage.

Koster, a Democrat, asked the federal judge who wrote the decision to amend her ruling so that religious organizations could exclude contraceptive coverage if they’re exempt under federal law.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Amidst legislative wrangling and uncertainty, the MoHealthNet Oversight Committee passed a resolution on Tuesday in support of expanding Medicaid.

The committee – which was set up in 2007 after lawmaker restructured the program – voted 8-2 with one abstention for a resolution “strongly encouraging the Missouri General Assembly and the governor to pass and sign enabling legislation in the 2013 session” expanding the program to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. That's about $26,000 a year for a family of three and  $32,000 a year for a four-member family.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley told reporters that he will do what it takes to stop state legislation to nullify the county’s foreclosure mediation ordinance.

“I think it’s a bad decision. I think St. Louis County is doing what’s in the best interest of St. Louis County,” Dooley said. “I’m always going to find myself doing what is the best interest of St. Louis County. This council indicated they wanted this bill for mediation for its constituency, which was hurt severely in the foreclosure debacle. And that’s where I stand.

State Treasurer Clint Zweifel won’t run for governor in 2016, a decision that removes a Democratic obstacle in Attorney General Chris Koster’s potential run for the office.

Mike Pridmore, the campaign spokesman for the two-term statewide official, told the Beacon that the age of Zweifel’s daughters were prime factor in his decision. Term limits prevent Gov. Jay Nixon from running again, which means the office will be open in 2016.

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