Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Jason Rosenbaum

Political Reporter

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in St. Louis with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. They have two sons, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum and Declan Todd Rosenbaum.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Sharon Tyus didn’t know until Wednesday morning whether she would be going back to the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.

That’s because Tyus went to sleep before she knew the results in Tuesday’s Democratic primary, which she described as one of her “little quirks” she’s picked up during her political career.

When she woke up, Tyus discovered she had unseated Alderman Charles “Quincy” Troupe in the primary to represent the north St. Louis 1st Ward. Tyus racked up 47.73 percent of the vote, compared to Troupe’s 34.01 percent and Yolanda Brown’s 18.26 percent. 

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With his victory over St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed and former Alderman Jimmie Matthews, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is likely to make history by becoming the first chief executive to win four four-year terms.

While other three-term mayors tried and failed to reach that milestone, Slay managed to achieve it with a 10-point victory in Tuesday's Democratic primary. He is heavily favored against Green Party nominee James McNeely in April's general election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A circuit judge slapped a temporary restraining order on St. Louis’ foreclosure mediation ordinance, effectively freezing the recently signed law for the time being.

On Tuesday, St. Louis Circuit Judge Robert Dierker ordered a 20-day hold on the ordinance, which St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay signed into law in late February. Dierker’s order barred the city “from enforcing the provisions of [the ordinance] provided that nothing herein shall be construed to prohibit voluntary participation in the program.” The Missouri Bankers Association and the Central Bank of Kansas City had sued to strike down the measure.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Board of Aldermen reconvenes later this year, the people who comprise the 28-member body will look awfully familiar.

That’s because St. Louis residents in 13 out of 15 wards voted to give incumbent city lawmakers another four years in office. That outcome wasn’t completely unexpected: Only seven wards had contested Democratic primaries, which in most cases are the decisive electoral contests. While several wards feature Republican or Green Party candidates, winning the Democratic primary in most instances is tantamount to election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: With polls opening in less than 24 hours, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and his chief rival – Aldermanic President Lewis Reed – are primarily focusing on one thing: getting their allied voters to show up.

“We’re preparing for ‘game day,’” said Reed campaign manager Glenn Burleigh.

After a weekend when both blitzed the city by showing up anywhere there was a crowd, Slay and Reed were spending their last campaign day zeroing on key voting blocs who can help each man the most.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: By Wednesday morning, St. Louis residents will have a pretty good idea of who the city's new mayor will be.

That’s because on Tuesday, city residents will vote in the Democratic primary for St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, St. Louis Aldermanic President President Lewis Reed or former Alderman Jimmie Matthews.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: An email campaign against state Sens. Paul LeVota, D-Independence, and Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, may have resulted in unintended consequences.

The Missouri chapter of Americans for Prosperity, a conservative organization, targeted LeVota and Nasheed for slowing down state Sen. Dan Brown’s bill to stop public sector unions from automatically deducting dues.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis’ battle for mayor isn’t the only key contest on the March 5 Democratic primary ballot. City voters in 14 odd-numbered wards -- and in the 6th Ward -- will also choose their aldermen for the next four years.

Because St. Louis is overwhelmingly Democratic, many of those wards have no candidates from any other party. So the March 5 victors will have a strong edge -- or, in many cases, a lock -- in the April 2 general election.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Show Me State political obsessives, take note: It’s no longer necessary to be glued to a computer when legislative debate is afoot.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - A St. Louis County judge issued a temporary restraining order against St. Louis County's foreclosure mediation program, effectively freezing the implementation of the initiative signed into law earlier this month.

St. Louis County Councilwoman Hazel Erby, D-University City, wants to raise the county's minimum wage to $15 an hour.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - The St. Louis County Council gave initial approval to an ordinance setting up a foreclosure mediation process, an issue that drew passionate testimony from advocates of distressed homeowners and criticism from those who question the proposal's legality.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 13, 2012 - In remarks that have since gone viral, retired businessman Rex Sinquefield referenced a column in a central Missouri newspaper that seemed to suggest that the Ku Klux Klan created public education to harm black children.

But the author of that column said the piece was meant to be satire and dark humor to make a broader point about the need for school vouchers and was not meant to be taken literally.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In remarks that have since gone viral, retired businessman Rex Sinquefield referenced a column in a central Missouri newspaper that seemed to suggest that the Ku Klux Klan created public education to harm black children.

But the author of that column said the piece was meant to be satire and dark humor to make a broader point about the need for school vouchers and was not meant to be taken literally.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 12, 2012 - Wealthy financier Rex Sinquefield is personally seeking to make the case that eliminating Missouri's income tax, and replacing it with a sales tax, would be an economic boon for the Show Me State.

But Sinquefield, who is bankrolling an initiative-petition drive on the subject, acknowledged Thursday that getting Missourians to go along with such a drastic change in their state's taxation system may take several years and perhaps several elections.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Wealthy financier Rex Sinquefield is personally seeking to make the case that eliminating Missouri's income tax, and replacing it with a sales tax, would be an economic boon for the Show Me State.

But Sinquefield, who is bankrolling an initiative-petition drive on the subject, acknowledged Thursday that getting Missourians to go along with such a drastic change in their state's taxation system may take several years and perhaps several elections.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 8, 2012 - Even though she's running as the Constitution Party's candidate for lieutenant governor, former Republican state Rep. Cynthia Davis returned to her roots Tuesday to vote in the non-binding Republican presidential primary.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 7, 2012 - After the agency's executive director asked for more time, the Metropolitan Sewer District's Board of Trustees decided today to hold off on changes to its minority-hiring policies.

In recent months MSD's minority hiring policies have come under renewed scrutiny, especially after the agency announced last year it would undertake a $4.7 billion plan to settle a federal lawsuit. Jeff Theerman, the agency's executive director, said at a January board meeting that MSD would launch a disparity study and make interim changes to current policies.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 7, 2012 - Former state Auditor Susan Montee kicked off her campaign for the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor this morning in the rotunda of St. Louis City Hall. Montee said she was the only candidate of "all of the parties that's ready to lead from day one."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 6, 2012 - State Rep. Sara Lampe, D-Springfield, is jumping into the race for lieutenant governor, making her the fourth Democratic challenger in the increasingly crowded statewide contest.

Lampe, D-Springfield, announced her intentions in a press release sent Sunday night.  She made her plans official this morning, in an event at the Plaster Student Union in Springfield.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 3, 2012 - State Sen. Robin Wright-Jones, D-St. Louis City, has introduced legislation to beef up security at the Missouri Capitol Building, a move that comes days after target stickers were placed on some legislators' office doors.

The senator filed a bill on Thursday to authorize the state's Office of Administration to contract with private firms to provide armed guards at the Missouri Capitol. She also seeks to restore the metal detectors removed from entrances several years ago.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 2, 2012 - Gov. Jay Nixon's embattled choice to lead the Department of Economic Development is stepping aside amid the Missouri Senate's decision not to vote on his nomination.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Feb. 1, 2012 - With the clock ticking, the Missouri Senate does not seem ready to act on Gov. Jay Nixon's choice to head up the state's Department of Economic Development.

The Democratic governor tapped attorney Jason Hall a few weeks ago to be his third economic development director, replacing David Kerr.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 18, 2012 - A St. Louis County Councilwoman sharply criticized advocates of an ordinance stipulating that abused women couldn't be turned away from shelters because of residency, saying that people pushing the change were engaging in "bullying, intimidation and shame."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 18, 2012 - A southwestern Missouri legislator -- House Speaker Pro Tem Shane Schoeller, R-Willard -- bested his two Republican rivals in the latest GOP financial jockeying for Missouri's open spot for secretary of state. But a rival, state Sen. Bill Stouffer, R-Napton, still holds an overall edge in the bank.

Schoeller is competing against Stouffer and state Sen. Scott Rupp, R-Wentzville,  for the statewide office currently held by Secretary of State Robin Carnahan.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 17, 2012 - Still without a Republican opponent, Attorney General Chris Koster has more than $1,286,000 cash on hand for his re-election bid later this year.

Koster, a Democrat who was a Republican until 2007, brought in $137,075 during the final fundraising quarter of 2011 and spent $106,349.24. (Click here to view his report.)

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Sen. Jason Crowell may not be a household name to most Missourians.

But the Republican from Cape Girardeau is getting a lot of credit -- and blame -- for what passed and what didn't make it through the Missouri General Assembly's meandering seven-week special session, which ended today.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When the Department of Homeland Security released a list in May of cities that qualified for the Urban Area Security Initiative program, Kansas City didn't make the cut -- even though it's been receiving funds since 2003.

This year, St. Louis was the only city in Missouri to receive part of the $662.6 million allocated toward preventing or responding to terrorism, and it will likely receive a smaller slice -- about $5.97 million -- than in the 2010 budget year.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For Mike Eads, a federal grant program to help local fire departments forestall layoffs provided some extra firepower in a crisis situation.

Eads is the fire chief at the Neosho Fire Department in southwest Missouri. In February, it received $780,643 from a Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response grant. SAFER is one of many grant programs under the Federal Emergency Management Agency's grant programs directorate -- part of the Department of Homeland Security -- that provides funds to local agencies.

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