Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Kelly Moffitt

Online Producer

Kelly Moffitt joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2015 as an online producer for St. Louis Public Radio's talk shows St. Louis on the Air.

Kelly was born in St. Louis and returned to the area after a period away in Los Angeles, Moscow and Columbia, wanting to know more about the city she grew up in. She holds three degrees from the University of Missouri; a BA in International Studies, a BJ in Magazine Journalism, and she graduated with honors in 2013 with an MA in Journalism, writing a thesis on community engagement efforts in the news. After returning to St. Louis, Kelly worked for the St. Louis Business Journal and the Center of Creative Arts. Now and again, you'll also find her slipping Big Lebowski references into stories she contributes to Missouri Life magazine. 

Sunrise, Daylight Saving Time
Matthias Bachmann | Flickr | http://bit.ly/1QM0RMs

Updated 3/12/18, originally broadcast 3/10/16

Love it or hate it, Daylight Saving Time began over the weekend. Across the country, people lost an hour of sleep in exchange for longer days through the summer. Is it worth it?

An artist's rendition of what a solar roadway could look like.
Solar Roadways | http://bit.ly/29OOZKM

Updated Nov. 5, 2017 with a statement from Solar Roadways - The Idaho vendor that planned to work with the Missouri Department of Transportation on a solar road initiative is disappointed the pilot project did not work out. In an email, Scott Brusaw with Solar Roadways said it was a complicated contract.

Courtney Berg and Kate T. Parker joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss "Strong is the New Pretty" and girls' empowerment.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday's St. Louis on the Air, we turned our discussion to that of girls empowerment with Kate T. Parker, author of “Strong is the New Pretty,” and Courtney Berg, executive director of Girls on the Run, a local non-profit that uses running as a tool for youth development.

"When you have power, you get to know your voice and use it," Berg said of the need to teach girls earlier of their power.

A view of the old North Side YMCA building from the old Sportsman's Park in JeffVanderLou. Mission: St. Louis, a local non-profit, recently moved to the building and has uncovered some unexpected surprises and historic elements.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This story originally aired on St. Louis on the Air on July 26, 2017. It was rebroadcast on Oct. 12, 2017.

If you’ve undertaken any kind of home renovation project, you’ve probably encountered a few, well, we’ll call them pleasant surprises.

What's the housing market looking like for millennials in St. Louis?
American Advisors Group | Flickr

Millennials are accused of a lot of things, not the least of which being that they don’t want to/can’t buy homes. Is this truly the case? And is it the case in St. Louis?

According to Barry Upchurch, the 2017 President of St. Louis REALTORS, that couldn’t be further from the truth in St. Louis. Homebuyers in the millennial generation make up 40 percent of those who own homes in the St. Louis region, he said.

Gaslight Cabaret

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard about the return of the Gaslight Cabaret Festival, which starts October 13 and runs through November 11. 

Joining the program with contributor Steve Potter were Farah Alvin and William Michals, discussing their careers and appearance at the festival in November. Alvin is a singer, songwriter and actress. Michals is a baritone singer and actor.

Ledy Van Kavage, a senior legislative attorney, with the Best Friends Animal Society.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

A new slate of laws meant to protect animals will go into effect in Illinois come Jan. 1. The number of laws passed in the recent legislative session has skyrocketed the state to be considered the first-ranked in the nation in terms of animal welfare, by the Animal Legal Defense Fund.

Missouri, on the other hand, is ranked 36th. 

Amanda Doyle, author of "100 Things To Do In St. Louis Before You Die."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is the kind of city you can live in all your life and still uncover hidden gems in neighborhoods you’ve never before visited.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, local author Amanda Doyle helped us uncover some of those gems as she discussed her book “100 Things to Do in St. Louis Before You Die.”

Matt Sorrell, Lavinia McCoy and Sean Morris discussed soul food on St. Louis on the Air.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis is home to so many soul food restaurants, it is hard to get an accurate count of them all. On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, contributor Steve Potter delved into the world of soul food from an outsider’s perspective. What comprises the food type? And what should you know about ordering?

Maurice Dawson and Shaji Kahn, information security professors at UMSL, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss cybersecurity.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed cybersecurity issues in light of the recent hacking of Equifax, one of three major credit reporting agencies in the United States.

Nearly 146 million Americans were impacted by the data breach that involved social security numbers, birth dates and other personal information. A website has been set up to help those impacted by the breach monitor their credit accounts. 

Joining him for the discussion were:

Dr. Andrea Hagemann (L) and Susan Robben (R) joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to talk about ovarian cancer.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

October marks ovarian cancer awareness month. According to the American Cancer Society, ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women.

In the United States, each year 22,000 women are diagnosed with the disease and 15,000 die from it.  

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed early warning signs of ovarian cancer, resources for those in treatment and ongoing efforts to increase survivorship with two guests:

Burnt-end nachos at West Port Social, one of Sauce Magazine's picks for new spots to try in St. Louis in October.
Sauce Magazine

The Sound Bites team at Sauce Magazine is back and ready to help you plan your nights out at St. Louis restaurants during the month of October.

On Monday, Catherine Klene, the magazine’s managing editor, and Matt Sorrell, a staff writer, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to discuss the openings and closings of restaurants you should know. 

You can find full descriptions here, but here are the spots they recommend:

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, world-renowned author Dan Brown, most famous for “The Da Vinci Code,” joined host Don Marsh to discuss his most recent novel, “Origin.”

The book, featuring the famous character Robert Langdon again, will be released on Oct. 3 and centers heavily on new technology. 

Heather Highland, Nicolle Barton and Aaron Banks, members of St. Louis' Civilian Oversight Board.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we heard about the plans for the next steps of the Civilian Oversight Board, whose function it is to investigate complaints made against the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

A two-year-old organization, the group is trying to determine ways to be more effective in investigating claims and improving police-community relations in St. Louis.

Dr. Keon Gilbert, assistant professor of behavioral science and health education at the College for Public Health and Social Justice at SLU.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Saint Louis University professor Keon Gilbert joined host Don Marsh to discuss his research on the police shootings of black men.

Gilbert is an assistant professor of behavioral science and health education at the College for Public Health and Social Justice at SLU.

Mårten Jansson and Philip Barnes discussed the Saint Louis Chamber Chorus' 62nd season on St. Louis on the Air.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh learned more about the Saint Louis Chamber Chorus’ 62nd season, which begins Oct. 1. The first performance of the six-concert season will feature a world premiere by Swedish composer Mårten Jansson.

Joining us in studio were Jansson himself as well as Philip Barnes, the artistic director of the Saint Louis Chamber Chorus, to preview the concert and what’s coming up in the 2017-2018 season.

File photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, we went “Behind the Headlines” with updates from the second week of protests in response to the Jason Stockley acquittal.

Reporter Willis Ryder Arnold and Executive Editor Shula Neuman, from the St. Louis Public Radio newsroom, joined the program to help bring us up to speed.

Percy Green and Cori Bush, two activists of different generations, sat down to talk to each other about what has changed - and what hasn't - in the movement.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis on the Air

Here in St. Louis, we’re well into the second week of protests following the acquittal of Jason Stockley. It’s a scene we’ve seen as recently in 2014, when protests erupted in response to the police shooting death of Michael Brown Jr.

Barry Lynn, the outgoing director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State.
Americans United for Separation of Church and State

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, Rev. Barry Lynn, the outgoing executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, joined host Don Marsh to discuss where the organization stands today. Lynn has served in the role for 25 years.

Lynn will be in St. Louis this weekend to be honored by local chapters of his organization, the Anti-Defamation League and the National Council of Jewish Women. 

On the set of a documentary shot in Ireland in 2016, featuring SLU professor Thomas Finnan.
HEC-TV

Time has a way of erasing what came before, often pushing lived history underground. A new documentary from HEC-TV that will premiere this fall follows the effort of one Saint Louis University professor and archaeologist as he and his team aim to uncover a specific piece of Irish history: the remnants of Gaelic lordship from the Middle Ages.

Gaelic Ireland refers to the era from around 1200 to 1700, or the late medieval period.

Pages