Margaret Wolf Freivogel

Editor

Margaret Wolf Freivogel is the editor of St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon. She was the founding editor of the St. Louis Beacon, a nonprofit news organization, from 2008 to 2013. A St. Louis native, Margie previously worked for 34 years at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as a reporter, Washington correspondent and assistant managing editor. She has received numerous awards for reporting as well as a lifetime achievement award from the St. Louis Press Club and the Missouri Medal of Honor from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. She is a board member of the Investigative News Network and a past president of Journalism and Women Symposium. Margie graduated from Kirkwood High School and Stanford University. She is married to William H. Freivogel. They have four grown children and five grandchildren. Margie enjoys rowing and is a fan of chamber music.

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Commentary
9:07 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Searching For Coherence In An Atomized World

Mehlville Superintendent Eric Knost
Credit Mehlville website

Some of St. Louis Public Radio’s best work this week wasn’t breaking news. It was making sense of news that broke days or even months earlier.

It’s been a year since the court ruling that opened the door to student transfers from Normandy and Riverview Gardens to Francis Howell, Mehlville, Kirkwood and other districts. Reporter Dale Singer circled back this week to ask key participants to reflect on their hopes, fears and actual experiences.

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Commentary
10:41 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Why A News Organization Is Like A University

University of Missouri - St. Louis at Grand Center
Credit file photo

Forty two years ago this week, St. Louis Public Radio began broadcasting from its home at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Coincidentally, those of us from the St. Louis Beacon, which merged with the station six months ago, are about to complete probation and become full-fledged UMSL employees.

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Commentary
10:28 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Maya Angelou's St. Louis Roots

In this 2011 photo taken in Harlem, Maya Angelou is seated and poet Eugene Redmond is at her right.
Credit Ros Crenshaw

St. Louisans may have felt some civic pride this week in noting that Maya Angelou was born here. But you have to wonder whether her brilliance and strength developed because of her St. Louis experiences or in spite of them. Perhaps both.

Obituaries recounted that the renowned author split her childhood between St. Louis and Arkansas after age 3, when her parents divorced. The rape she wrote about in "I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings" happened here. Segregation was an ugly fact of life in both places. Yet so were family resilience and ambition.

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Commentary
9:46 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Keeping An Eye On Student Transfers

The Missouri House
Credit Bill Greenblatt | UPI

The Missouri legislative session’s finale played out this week with members in their usual swivet of last-minute activity and suspense. Watching the action in the closing days is like watching the cap dance at a Cardinals’ game — blink and you lose track of what’s going on.

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Commentary
10:10 pm
Thu May 1, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Robert Joiner's Untold Story

Robert Joiner

Robert Joiner, St. Louis Public Radio’s health reporter, is not the kind of person who calls attention to himself. At staff meetings, he speaks sparingly. He chooses words carefully.

It’s worth paying attention to what he thinks.

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Commentary
9:34 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Impeaching Nixon, Again

October 1973
Credit Wikipedia

Nixon impeachment hearings began this week.

Not THAT Nixon. Not President Richard Milhous, who resigned 40 years ago this August rather than face House votes on three articles of impeachment. This time, the Nixon under discussion is Gov. Jeremiah Wilson “Jay,” who remains very much in power as a Missouri House committee begins consideration of three articles of impeachment against him.

Beyond the jolt of déjà vu you might get from the headline, there’s little to connect the political drama of 1973-74 and the political theater playing out now.

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Commentary
5:10 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Stories Of Evil And Courage Close To Home

Frazier Glenn Cross once headed a North Carolina Klan organization.
Credit Wikipedia | archival photo

The national news brought poignant remembrances of the Boston Marathon this week. Close to home, the news brought fresh, stark examples of the best and worst in human nature.

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Commentary
8:42 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Editor's Weekly: Lessons In Compromise From Missouri's Most Liberal Legislator

Credit Sean Sandefur/St. Louis Public Radio.

State Rep. Rory Ellinger's colleagues paid tribute to him last week with quick passage and ceremonial signing of his bill to help breast-feeding mothers. The gesture more than the bill itself symbolizes Rory's legacy as a public servant.

Somehow, despite extreme polarization and a rightward turn in Missouri politics, one of Missouri's most liberal legislators has earned both respect and genuine affection from colleagues of all ideological stripes.

How did this happen?

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Commentary
10:58 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Editor's Weekly: St. Louis History Is A Hit With Current Residents

A piece of tin enameled ceramic from the colonial period found in the archeological dig below site below the Poplar Street Bridge. It is likely a Spanish ceramic of polychrome majolica.
Credit Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio intern

News is usually, well, new. But some of our most interesting stories recently have focused on things that are old – really old.

This week, Alex Heuer reported that construction under the Poplar Street Bridge has unearthed remnants of one of St. Louis’ original French houses – something historians never expected to find. Shards of pottery are a clue that the city’s residents may have been more prosperous than previously thought.

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Commentaries
10:33 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Editor's Weekly: New Media, Old Diversity Challenges

Credit fakhar | sxc.hu

A welcome debate has unfolded recently over lack of diversity among digital news organizations — welcome because it raises important questions about whether media in the future will serve the public better than media did in the past.

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