Marshall Griffin

Statehouse Reporter

St. Louis Public Radio State House Reporter Marshall Griffin is a native of Mississippi and proud alumnus of Ole Miss (welcome to the SEC, Mizzou!).  He has been in radio for over 20 years, starting out as a deejay. His big break in news came when the first President Bush ordered the invasion of Panama in 1989. Marshall was working the graveyard shift at a rock station, and began ripping news bulletins off an old AP teletype and reading updates between songs. From there on, his radio career turned toward news reporting and anchoring. In 1999, he became the capital bureau chief for Florida's Radio Networks, and in 2003 he became News Director at WFSU-FM/Florida Public Radio. During his time in Tallahassee he covered seven legislative sessions, Governor Jeb Bush's administration, four hurricanes, the Terri Schiavo saga, and the 2000 presidential recount. Before coming to Missouri, he enjoyed a brief stint in the Blue Ridge Mountains, reporting and anchoring for WWNC-AM in Asheville, North Carolina. Marshall lives in Jefferson City with his wife, Julie, their dogs, Max and Liberty Belle, and their cat, Honey.

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Ferguson
8:36 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Nixon Says National Guard Needed, But Are Troops Wanted?

Gov. Jay Nixon
Credit Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Gov. Jay Nixon is defending his decision to deploy Missouri National Guard troops to Ferguson.

Nixon issued a statement earlier this morning, announcing his decision to send in the Guard after what may have been the worst night of rioting since the protests began a week ago. Nixon explained his decision by citing "violent criminal acts of an organized and growing number of individuals, many from outside the community and state, whose actions are putting the residents and businesses of Ferguson at risk."

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Student Achievement
6:17 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

Statewide MAP Test Scores Down In English, Math & Science, Up In Social Studies

The Missouri State Board of Education announced a drop in this year's state MAP scores over last year.
Credit Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Figures released today Tuesday by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) show an overall drop in standardized test scores for the state's public school students.

Fewer students during the past school year achieved "proficient" scores for English, math and science sections of the Missouri Assessment Program, or MAP, tests.  Social studies was the only subject that saw overall scores rise.  

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Primary Election 2014
4:49 pm
Sat August 9, 2014

Transportation Tax May Have Been Doomed By Being Placed On August Ballot

Credit UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Gov. Jay Nixon may be the primary reason a proposed transportation sales tax failed this week at the polls, according to one political expert.

George Connor, political science professor at Missouri State University in Springfield, says the governor's decision to place the 0.75 percent sales tax on the August primary ballot likely doomed it to failure because most of the state's primary races drew in GOP voters.

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Primary Election 2014
5:15 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Back To The Drawing Board For Missouri's Transportation Leaders

MoDOT Director Dave Nichols (left) and MHTC Chair Steve Miller meet with reporters following Tuesday's defeat of a proposed 0.75 percent transportation sales tax.
Credit Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri transportation leaders are looking to regroup following voters' overwhelming rejection of a proposed  sales tax to fund road and bridge improvements on Tuesday.

Despite supporters spending millions, the measure lost by roughly 58 percent to 41 percent. And it lost across the state -- in St. Louis, St. Louis County, the Kansas City area and even in rural parts of the state. In St. Louis and St. Louis County, the measure went down by a 2-to-1 margin.

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Primary Election
12:08 am
Wed August 6, 2014

Amendments: Right To Farm, Guns And Privacy Win

A commercial chicken house in Florida.
Credit USDA | Wikipedia

It was an early night for most of the amendments, but the farm interests had to stay up late. Shortly after midnight, unofficial state returns showed Amendment 1, the "right to farm" proposal, winning by 2,528 votes. That was a a margin of only about one-quarter of 1 percent, which is close enough to entitle the opposition to a recount.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting in statewide, Amendment 1 passed with 498,751 votes, or 50.127 percent.  The "no" votes came in at 496,223, or 49.873 percent.

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Primary Election 2014
9:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Missouri Voters To Decide On Privacy Protection, Veterans' Lottery Ticket

If Missouri voters pass Constitutional Amendment No. 9, electronic communications would be protected.
Credit (via Flickr/derekGavey)

Of the five proposed constitutional amendments Missourians will get to vote on in August, two of them have generated little attention and virtually no controversy.  One would expand the right against unreasonable search and seizures to include electronic communications and data, while the other would create a new Missouri lottery ticket to fund the needs of veterans.

Electronic data and communications

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Primary Election 2014
6:38 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Missouri Transportation Commissioners Approve Final Transportation Tax Project List

Interstate 70, just east of the Mo. River Bridge near Rocheport. The bridge would be replaced by a newer one as part of the expansion of I-70 under the Amendment 7 project list.
Credit (MoDOT)

Missouri transportation commissioners have approved a list of projects totalling $4.8 billion that would be funded by a 0.75 percent sales tax that voters will decide next month.

The wish list contains more than 800 projects, most of them road and bridge improvements. If passed, money would go to replacing or improving 330 bridges across the state and resurfacing more than 3,200 miles of roads. But the list also includes improvements at 24 airports, seven river ports, 14 railroads, and 71 sidewalks.  

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Primary Election 2014
5:25 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Would 'Right To Farm' Ballot Question Protect Family Farms Or Ag Corporations?

Credit / Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Do Missouri’s farmers and ranchers need a constitutional amendment to continue their way of life, or does current law offer enough protection? That’s the debate surrounding one of the five ballot measures Missouri voters will decide next month. Supporters and opponents are campaigning and spending money on efforts to both pass and kill the proposal that could limit regulations on farming and ranching.

Origins and journey of 'Right to Farm'

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Missouri Budget
12:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Nixon Cuts More Than $1 Billion From FY2015 State Budget

Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon briefing reporters on cuts to FY2015 state budget.
Credit Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 3:57 p.m. with reaction from House Budget Chair Rick Stream, R-Kirkwood.

Updated at 3:21 p.m. with reaction from House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka.

Updated with reactions at 2:25 p.m., Tues., June 24. 

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has announced $1.1 billion in cuts from the Fiscal Year 2015 state budget that goes into effect July 1.

Those cuts include nearly $276 million in line-item vetoes and $846 million in temporary withholds, which could be released by the governor at a later date.

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Missouri 2014 Legislative Session
8:18 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

Nixon Signs Bill Revamping Missouri's Funeral Protest Law

Credit Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed several bills passed during the 2014 regular session into law Friday.

Tweak to funeral protest law

First, Nixon signed  House Bill 1372, which fixes a legal issue with Missouri's ban on protests at funerals.

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