Robert W. Duffy

Robert Duffy, campaign director with St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon, began his career in the news business in 1955 when he took a job delivering the Arkansas Gazette in his hometown, Little Rock. He joined the St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 1973 and worked there, with one brief interruption, for 32 years. He served as a reporter, critic, columnist, editorial writer and editor there, working in every department of the newsroom except sports. In addition to the Post-Dispatch, articles by him have appeared in national magazines such as U.S. News and World Report, Smithsonian and Modernism, and he has contributed essays or chapters to several books on architectural and urban-design subjects. Bob is a member of the faculties of University College and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, and is a 1967 graduate of the university’s College of Arts and Sciences.

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Leo Drey
Provided by the family

In 1929, Luther Ely Smith, whom the National Park Service calls “the father of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial,” convened a group of civic worthies for lunch at the old Noonday Club downtown. Later on, a fellow named Leo Drey joined the group. Mr. Drey, who died Wednesday at the age of 98, would become a stalwart member of the group, and one of its most dynamic leaders.

Aida Act 2, scene 2, set design for the Cairo premiere by Edouard Despléchin
Wikipedia

“Aida” is one of a group of extraordinary 19th century works of musical drama that gave opera its sometime first name, that is, “Grand.” In an all-stops-pulled-out production of “Aida,” soldiers lead chain gangs of slaves and supernumeraries wave huge feather fans, with nubile ballerinas dancing their own special ballet, plus the company of acres of choristers, plus elephants sometimes and a cast of principals with voices grand as all outdoors.

Such an “Aida” etches indelible memories on an audience member, leaving him or her either breathless with devotion or convinced that all this actually is excessive and silly.

Richard Gaddes introduces Christine Brewer at the Walk of Fame ceremonies Wednesday.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday, Christine Brewer was properly awarded a star on St. Louis' Walk of Fame in the Delmar Loop. To think about her journey there, it is useful to go back 34 years, when Opera Theatre of St. Louis had become the regional American opera company to watch. And that dates to 1976, when Richard Gaddes, a fearless young British impresario, was brought to town to establish the company.

The dark red cylinder in the background is the 'hydraulic actuator' that moved a large steel box.The large red tube in front is the 'hydraulic accumulator' that supplied surge flows of oil, and absorbed the hydraulic pressure surges.
Provided by Jim Vosper

When I talked to Elaine Gregory McCluskey recently at her office at Fermilab in Batavia, Ill., and explained I was working on a story about engineering experiments at the Pruitt-Igoe housing project in the 1970s, she was bewildered. Why, why was I writing about Pruitt Igoe almost four decades after the place had been obliterated?

Joseph Pulitzer the Fourth
Provided by the family

Joseph Pulitzer IV, the last of a line of Joseph Pulitzers stretching back to the 19th century to hold positions at the family’s St. Louis Post-Dispatch, died Thursday in Berkeley, Calif., following a massive heart attack. He was 65 and lived in Sheridan, Wyo.

Michael Morgan
Provided by the family

Michael Morgan, whose day job was lawyering but whose passion was making music, particularly on the piano, died Friday at the Mari de Villa retirement center in Town and Country of Glioblastoma multiforme, a most virulent and aggressive form of brain tumor. He was 64.

Amazon.com

Belinda Rathbone, the youngest of three children of the late Perry Townsend Rathbone, a former director of the St. Louis Art Museum, placed her father under a magnifying glass that brought into view a revelatory picture of a man and a profession that is at once impartial and exulting.

Frederick A. Hermann Jr.
Provided by the family

Dr. William H. Danforth, chancellor emeritus of Washington University, is by any reckoning our region’s First Citizen. It is not only proper but also sensible that he be called upon to discuss the life and character of a recently deceased friend, and fellow civic pillar, Frederick A. Hermann Jr. For Mr. Hermann he provided without hesitation this simple but profoundly sincere description. 

“He was wonderful.”

Gustel R. Kiewitt
Provided by the family

After Kitty Mollman’s husband, Clay, died in the summer of 2012 after a long illness, she and her daughter, Melanie Mollman Hancock, decided it was high time to renovate their family’s home in Ladue. It needed fixing-up and painting-up; and some do-it-yourself remedies made along the way needed undoing.

Perry Bascom
Provided by the family

If you looked across a crowded room at a party and saw Perry Bascom, you might get the impression that he was just another unreconstructed preppy on his way to play tennis. Or should you glimpse him on his way to work, you might conclude he was one more soul heading downtown to commence another day of quiet desperation in business.

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