Shula Neuman

Editor

Shula Neuman has more than a decade of journalism experience as both a print and radio reporter.  Shula comes to St. Louis Public Radio after working as an editor for NPR in Washington, D.C.  She also reported on economic development for Cleveland’s public radio station and, before that, worked as a reporter and evening newscaster at St. Louis Public Radio.  Yes, this is Shula’s second stint with St. Louis Public Radio. She says she just can’t stay away from her hometown because she’s tired of rooting for the Cardinals in absentia.  Shula has a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University; an Executive M.B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis; and a bachelor’s from Reed College in Portland, OR. She claims she has no intention of going back to school again.  Shula is an avid cyclist, canine enthusiast and compulsive baker (although she has yet to bake anything for dogs).

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Prescription Drugs
3:58 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Missouri And Prescription Drug Databases: Considerations For The Curious

Credit (via Flickr/e-MagineArt.com)

Drugs, privacy, prison. Those three things are linked to the debate over prescription drug databases -- and Missouri is the only state in the U.S. without one.

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Vehicle Stops
5:49 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Vehicle Stops In Missouri: Blacks Still Disproportionately Targeted

Credit (via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Police stopped more than a million drivers in Missouri in 2013, statistics released Friday show, with African Americans still more likely to be pulled over than whites.

The Missouri Attorney General's office released the annual Vehicle Stops Report (VSR) Friday. In a statement, Attorney General Chris Koster said that the disproportionate number of stops of African American is less than ideal, but should serve as a way to start talking about how to remediate the trend.

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The Rundown
10:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Women In The News — Again

Jill Abramson delivering her commencement address at Wake Forest University on Monday, May 19.
Credit (Wake Forest University)

If there’s one thing I hate to do as a writer is repeat myself. I don’t like to say the same thing over and over again.

But sometimes, stories are so compelling and just don’t seem to die. So, I find that I have to retread familiar ground just a little bit.

This time, it’s women in corporate America.

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

For those who have forgotten our high school French, that handy phrase translates to: "The more things change, the more they stay the same."

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The Rundown
9:45 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Economy & Innovation Rundown: Discrimination Suit At A-B And Other Questions About Women In Business

They make the "king of beers." And the queen?
Credit (Flickr/Philip Leara)

It’s Tuesday, that magical day of the week when our thoughts turn to questions of economics, business, innovation, technology … and related topics that tickle our fancy but we haven’t been able to report on ourselves. It’s the day we say, “Don’t think we haven’t been paying attention, dear reader,” and we share some the things we’ve been reading on topics of interest. 

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Emerald Ash Borer
7:42 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

St. Louis Ash Trees, Be Warned: The Emerald Ash Borer Is On The Loose

An adult Emerald Ash Borer is less than a half-inch long. The invasive beetle travels on cut wood and has spread through the Midwest.
Credit (David Cappaert, Michigan State University)

Beware the Emerald Ash Borer. 

Ash trees in the St. Louis area are susceptible to attacks from the Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive species of beetle that has been creeping toward the area since 2008.

The green beetle, with a penchant for any kind of ash tree, has infested and killed millions of trees nationwide. The beetle is native of Asia and was first found in Michigan in the early 2000s, although recent research suggests the bug could have been here since the early 1990s.

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Trains
7:42 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Union Station Opens And Celebrates National Train Day

The Gateway Garden Railroad Club, Inc., features trains that you can keep outside.
(Shula Neuman, St. Louis Public Radio)

Train enthusiasts and history buffs gathered at the re-opening of Union Station yesterday in downtown St. Louis. The newly rehabbed train station and hotel kicked off its inaugural weekend by celebrating National Train Day.

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The Rundown
5:32 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Economy & Innovation Rundown: An Economist's Passing, And The Risks Of St. Louis' New Parking Meters

Gary Becker received the Nobel Economics Prize in 1992 for his work that suggested every aspect of human behavior was subject to economic analysis. Becker died on Saturday. He was 83.
Credit (Courtesy; University of Chicago)

It’s Tuesday, the day when we poke our heads out of the offices of St. Louis Public Radio and review some of the other stories brewing in the economy that have piqued our interest.

First up is news that a very important economist has left this earth. Nobel Laureate Gary Becker died on Saturday. He is most notable for his economic theories that tried to explain human behavior, tackling questions that went way beyond supply and demand. The University of Chicago professor studied things like crime, racial discrimination and even romance.

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Allergy And Access
9:15 pm
Sun May 4, 2014

Health, Science, Environment Rundown: Bad Air In St. Louis And Other Painful Things

The air isn't as clear as you think it is.
Credit (Flickr/Paul Sableman)

Last week, the calendar turned from April to May, bringing with it plenty of budding leaves, flowers and allergies.  

But it’s not just pollen in the air that could be causing your eyes to burn and your throat to itch. The American Lung Association also came out with its annual State of the Air 2014 report and the findings do not reflect well on the St. Louis area.

The city of St. Louis and St. Louis County received the following grades:

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The Rundown
9:35 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Economy & Innovation Rundown: The Wrath of Cabs

The pink mustache of a Lyft car. They've been forced to stop business in St. Louis for now. But in other places, lawmakers are finding a way to make new car sharing services work.
Credit (Flickr/Alfredo Mendez)

A maroon car with a pink mustache drove past me this weekend when I was out walking the dog. It was not a car trying to make a fashion statement. It was one of the new Lyft drivers who put the distinctive pink mustache on her car’s grille as an indicator that she is open for business.

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The Rundown
9:53 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Health & Science Rundown: Salamanders And The Delicate Balance

The fire salamander wasn't a part of any of the studies mentioned in this article. But it's very photogenic.
Credit (Flickr/William Warby)

The humble salamander kicks off this week’s summary of science, health and environmental news.

Actually, the salamander may not be so humble. Or at least, not woodland salamanders. It turns out, those little critters are hugely helpful in decreasing the amount of carbon gas released into the atmosphere. And they do it because they are very good eaters.

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