Tim Lloyd

Education Reporter

Tim Lloyd grew up north of Kansas City and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since joining St. Louis Public Radio in 2012, he has won seven Edward R Murrow Awards in categories that include Writing, Hard News, Continuing Coverage, Use of Sound and Sports Reporting.  In 2015 he won the Education Writers Association's national award for best beat reporter, broadcast.  In 2010 he received the national Debakey Journalism Award and in 2009 he won a Missouri Press Association award for Best News Feature.  Previously, he launched digital reporting efforts for Harvest Public Media, a Corporation for Public Broadcasting funded collaboration between Midwestern NPR member stations that focuses on agriculture and food issues.  His stories have aired on a variety of stations and shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, ​Marketplace, Only A Game and Here and Now.  

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(via Doug Weber)

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Updated 3:45 p.m. City fire chief Dennis Jenkerson says the cause of the fire is not suspicious, and building appears to be up to code:

"The question that came up was the draft stops up in the attic, and in reviewing the plans, and also we sent firefighters over there this morning and we went up in the attics of the remaining buildings, and all buildings had the draft stops as required. This was just a very hot and quick-moving fire."

(via Flickr/binkle_28)

The East-West Gateway Council of Governments held the first of four public forums tonight for its new study on development at MetroLink stations.  

The project will create a toolkit local stakeholders can use to create sustainable communities around MetroLink stations and encourage business development.

Mary Grace Lewandowski is an assistant project manager for the study and said the agency will use a number of criteria to identify five stations with especially high development potential.

(via Flickr/KOMUnews/Malory Ensor)

Dry conditions are expected to get worse in the coming days, and it will take a whole lot more than scattered thunderstorms to break the drought. 

“We’re way, way, way below normal in rainfall,” National Weather Service Meteorologist Fred Glass said.  “Most of the area is in severe drought conditions, it’s going to quite a bit of rain to make that up, probably in many areas 8-12 inches, and in some areas in excess of 12 inches.”

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Some Missourians could soon have their criminal records expunged

Missourians could be able to get some criminal misdeeds expunged from their records.

Under newly approved state legislation, people could ask the courts to erase their criminal history after 10 years for a misdemeanor and after 20 years for a felony.

Those seeking to have criminal records expunged would need to have completed their prison terms, probation and parole. They also would need to have paid restitution and not have committed another crime.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

A collection of federal, state and local officials celebrated the completion of the relocated Route 141 project and the Page-Olive Connector.   

The project’s completion opens up 24-miles of unimpeded traffic from Interstate 55 at the south to Highway 370 at the north.

Earlier today, joggers and bicyclists were allowed to leisurely peddle and jog down the stretch of new roadway before officially opening to traffic.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

The idea of a health care exchange in Missouri continues to be a political sticking point between Republicans and Democrats.

Today, Governor Jay Nixon did his best to sidestep the issue.

In fact, Nixon says he hasn’t really looked at how the ballot measure is written.

As for the idea of health care exchanges in general, the governor isn’t ready to commit.

via Flickr/J_D_R

A new ordinance in St. Louis County will soon require that businesses are up to date with property tax payments and officials say the new rule could generate up to $35 million in revenue. 

The ordinance closes a loophole that allowed businesses to be issued permits and licenses even if they didn't pay their property tax.

St. Louis County Director of Revenue Eugene Leung hopes the move will save residents money.

(via Flickr/Be.Futureproof)

Starting today, motorists in Illinois will see safe driving messages on the state's digital road signs.

The campaign from the Illinois Department of Transportation is an effort to reduce the number of fatal accidents in the state. So far this year, 479 people have died on Illinois roads, compared with 418 by the same time last year.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Early drought exacting a toll on regional corn farmers

Extreme heat and drought are driving down what many farmers expected to be a bumper corn crop.  

Back in March and April, warm weather had Midwestern farmers planting corn at a record setting pace.

In Illinois alone, an estimated more than 13 million acres of corn were planted this year.  

Now, many growers are in full on damage control as record setting heat continues to drive down expected yields.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Congressman Lacy Clay is asking fellow St. Louis Democrat Russ Carnahan to knock it off with claims that he was in cahoots with Republicans to consolidate St. Louis's two congressional districts

Both Clay and Carnahan are vying for the Democratic nomination for the 1st Congressional District.

The issue has become a bit of a he-said-he-said between the former congressional allies, and Clay says he's just trying to get the facts straight.

(via Flickr/Jack W. Reid)

Thermostats turned to extra low and the blistering heat has put added stress on Ameren Missouri's power system.

There have been a handful of small power outages throughout the region, but so far nothing major.  And looking at a week of triple digit high temperatures, Ameren Missouri says it’s ready to take on the extended heat wave.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Medicaid expansion program in St. Louis

Days after the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its ruling on the Affordable Care Act a Medicaid expansion program kicks off today in St. Louis.

Gateway to Better health is a federal demonstration project that expands Medicaid coverage for low income residents of St. Louis City and County.

The 18 month pilot program is fueled by a $25 million federal grant.

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Updated at 3:53 pm with details on fire containment

A fire that burned between 550 and 600 acres at Mark Twain National Forest is partially contained.

The forest's fire management officer, Jody Eberly, said Saturday that crews plan to spend the weekend mopping up around the fire's perimeter.

Meanwhile, Gov. Jay Nixon flew Saturday over the burned land in southeast Missouri's Iron County. He says numerous smaller fires are burning across state.

pasa47 / Flickr

The City of St. Louis has unveiled its plan to renovate the Soulard Market and Park.

Physical improvements would include completely enclosing the market, expanding parking options and adding signage that distinguishes venders that are selling locally grown food from vendors that are reselling produce or other food items.

The farmers market would be open all weekend, too.

Citing a survey indicating strong customer demand, the market would shift from being open Wednesday through Saturday to Thursday through Sunday. 

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan pulled up a chair in a circle of desks and asked students what they do to avoid conflict.

The summer school class he attended at Vashon High School is paid for by a federal grant aimed at turning around struggling schools.

The school will receive $378,536 from the grant for fiscal year 2012-2013 and Duncan says his department is getting its money’s worth. 

(via Flickr/breahn)

The St. Louis County Economic Council is opening the doors to its new biotech incubator on Monday afternoon and the agency says it will serve as a launching pad for biotech businesses.

Officials say The Helix Center Biotech Incubator is a 17,000 square foot facility loaded with lab and office space with a prime location next to the Danforth Plant Center.

Entrepreneurial efforts are nothing new to the council, which runs four other incubators in the region.

J Wynia / Flickr

Last night the East-West Gateway Council of Governments wrapped up a series of open houses for Missouri residents who have questions about the agency’s $2 billion transportation plan.

Earlier this month the organization that oversees regional ground transportation projects released its funding report for the next three fiscal years.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Quinn will close two prisons, including Tamms

Rachel Otwell contributed reporting from Springfield, Ill.

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn made it official on Tuesday - he will close two state prisons, including the state's supermax facility in Tamms.

Rep. Brandon Phelps, of Harrisburg, says he received a brief memo from Quinn, saying that Tamms and a prison in Dwight will close, as well as juvenile detention centers in Joliet and Murphysboro. That's despite legislators including money in the 2013 budget for the facilities.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

There usually isn't much of a market for old streetcars, many of which were built in the 1920s. And the ones you can find are usually in pretty bad shape.

So when officials from the Loop Trolley project got a tip that five well-maintained cars were sitting in storage in Seattle, they headed west to investigate - and liked what they saw, said project manager Doug Campion.

"The fact that it's a full fleet, my goodness," Campion said. "This could be very good for us, very helpful."

St. Charles County Department of Corrections

Updated at 6:15 am Wednesday with comments from U.S. attorney

For the second time in four days, the former co-owner of a once prominent marketer of auto service contracts has pleaded guilty.

Cory Atkinson of Lake St. Louis, Mo., on Monday pleaded guilty to federal charges including conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and filing false tax returns. On Thursday, he pleaded guilty to state charges that included insurance fraud and stealing.