abortion

(Akin: UPI Bill Greenblatt/McCaskill: Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill says she raised about $5.8 million for her re-election campaign over the past three months.

McCaskill, who's being challenged by Republican congressman Todd Akin, said today her total is the most money ever raised by a Missouri Senate candidate for this quarter.

Candidates are not required to file their quarterly campaign finance reports until Oct. 15. Akin has not yet released his.

(via Flickr/lilhelen)

Brian Mackey contributed reporting for this story.

A decades-long battle over an Illinois law that requires girls to notify their parents before having an abortion was in front of the state's Supreme Court on Thursday.

The parental notification law has been on the books since the 1990s, but a series of federal and state court challenges have kept it from being enforced. It was supposed to take effect in 2006, which set off a fresh round of lawsuits.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Three people killed on Grand Bridge following early morning police chase

The Grand Bridge was closed for several hours early Thursday morning as the result of a vehicle crash that left three people dead and another person critically injured.

The crash happened as the car was fleeing police.

Missouri Congressman Todd Akin's remarks on abortion and 'legitimate rape' are being used by politicians not only on the national stage, but also in congressional races outside the Show-Me state. Catharine Richert of Minnesota Public Radio explains via the link.

Since Republican Rep. Todd Akin first said the words "legitimate rape" Sunday, just about everyone in the Republican Party has condemned those comments.

The Missouri Senate candidate later apologized, but his remarks continue to drive the political debate. They've also raised questions about the anti-abortion record of the Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would bar local governments from interfering with the day-to-day operations of alternatives to abortion agencies.

The bill would forbid municipalities from regulating advertising and advice given out by crisis pregnancy centers run by pro-life groups.  Supporters say they’re trying to protect the First Amendment free speech rights of volunteers and staff at the centers.  The sponsor, State Rep. Chuck Gatschenberger (R, Lake St. Louis), admits it’s a preemptive move.

via Flickr | jennlynndesign

Women seeking prescriptions for abortion-inducing drugs could face greater requirements than those wanting surgical abortions under a bill endorsed by the Missouri House.

Missouri law already requires a woman to have a consultation with a doctor or qualified professional 24 hours before undergoing an abortion.

The bill given initial approval Tuesday would require a woman to receive a physical examination by a doctor 24 hours before the doctor prescribes the abortion-inducing drug RU-486.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Shimkus on Obama's State of the Union address

President Barack Obama delivered an election-year message to Republicans: Game on.

The GOP - in Congress and on the campaign trail - signaled it's ready for the fight.

In his State of the Union address Tuesday night, Obama issued a populist call for income equality that echoed the Occupy Wall Street movement. He also challenged GOP lawmakers to work with him or move aside so he could use the power of the presidency to produce results for an electorate uncertain whether he deserves another term.

(via Flickr/lilhelen)

The Illinois Supreme Court has agreed to consider a dispute over whether the state must begin enforcing a law requiring parents to be notified before their children can obtain an abortion.

The law dates back to 1995 but has never been enforced because of various court actions.

It would require doctors to notify the guardians of a girl 17 or younger before she has an abortion. There are exceptions for emergencies and cases of sexual abuse, and girls could bypass the notification requirement by going to a judge.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Pat Quinn says he thinks Cardinal Francis George and other Catholic leaders "made a mistake" criticizing the governor for agreeing to present an award at a ceremony hosted by an abortion-rights organization.

Quinn on Monday said he wishes George would have contacted him before issuing a statement saying the governor was rewarding those who support "the legal right to kill children in their mothers' wombs." Quinn is to present rape victim Jennie Goodman with an award at a luncheon hosted by Personal PAC, which aims to elect pro-choice candidates.

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