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Abortion

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When state Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick tweeted earlier this month that this year’s veto session would be “interesting,” he may have made the understatement of the year.

The Shell Knob Republican’s quip was a more than tacit acknowledgement that the Missouri General Assembly sent numerous bills to Gov. Jay Nixon that might not meet his favor, including legislation restricting deduction of union dues to a broad-based tax cut.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri General Assembly is launching into its final week of the session by redirecting its attention to certain issues – such as health care, abortion and labor unions – that had been on the back burner until the state budget was completed.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri Senate Committee has passed legislation that puts restrictions on the use of abortion-inducing drugs. 

The bill would require the prescribing doctor to be physically present whenever a patient takes RU-486 or any other medication designed to terminate a pregnancy.  Supporters say it’s designed to prevent so-called “web-cam abortions,” in which a doctor at another location instructs the patient on taking the medicine.

Susan Klein of Missouri Right to Life testified in favor of the bill before the vote.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The anti-abortion group, Missouri Roundtable for Life, has filed an initiative petition that – if approved for circulation – would ask Missouri voters in 2014 to restore campaign donation limits, which had been in place for 14 years in the state.

Such a move appears to put the conservative group on the same side as Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat who supports reproductive rights and who has long sought to restore campaign donation limits.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Four bills dealing with the ongoing cultural battle surrounding women’s reproductive health were heard Monday night before a Missouri Senate committee.

They include a measure that would require a doctor to be physically present whenever abortion-inducing drugs are administered to a woman.  It’s sponsored by freshman Senator Wayne Wallingford (R, Cape Girardeau).  He says women who take RU-486 or other abortion-inducing drugs at home run a severe risk of complications.

(via Flickr)

Tuesday is the 40th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Roe v Wade, the landmark case that legalized abortion.

Groups on both sides of the controversial issue will be marking the day.

The Archdiocese of St. Louis was the first Catholic diocese to organize a Pro Life committee just 6 weeks after the famous court ruling.

Today that committee is called the Respect Life Apostolate.

Executive Director Karen Nolkemper says the Archdiocese will focus on commemoration of the un-born  and recommitting to ending abortion.

(Via Wikimedia Commons/Victor byckttor)

Giving women free access to contraception can dramatically reduce abortion rates.

That's the finding of a new study out today from Washington University School of Medicine.

Researchers gave more than 9,000 St. Louis-area women free birth control for three years.

(Akin: UPI Bill Greenblatt/McCaskill: Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill says she raised about $5.8 million for her re-election campaign over the past three months.

McCaskill, who's being challenged by Republican congressman Todd Akin, said today her total is the most money ever raised by a Missouri Senate candidate for this quarter.

Candidates are not required to file their quarterly campaign finance reports until Oct. 15. Akin has not yet released his.

(via Flickr/lilhelen)

Brian Mackey contributed reporting for this story.

A decades-long battle over an Illinois law that requires girls to notify their parents before having an abortion was in front of the state's Supreme Court on Thursday.

The parental notification law has been on the books since the 1990s, but a series of federal and state court challenges have kept it from being enforced. It was supposed to take effect in 2006, which set off a fresh round of lawsuits.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Three people killed on Grand Bridge following early morning police chase

The Grand Bridge was closed for several hours early Thursday morning as the result of a vehicle crash that left three people dead and another person critically injured.

The crash happened as the car was fleeing police.

Missouri Congressman Todd Akin's remarks on abortion and 'legitimate rape' are being used by politicians not only on the national stage, but also in congressional races outside the Show-Me state. Catharine Richert of Minnesota Public Radio explains via the link.

Since Republican Rep. Todd Akin first said the words "legitimate rape" Sunday, just about everyone in the Republican Party has condemned those comments.

The Missouri Senate candidate later apologized, but his remarks continue to drive the political debate. They've also raised questions about the anti-abortion record of the Republican vice presidential candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would bar local governments from interfering with the day-to-day operations of alternatives to abortion agencies.

The bill would forbid municipalities from regulating advertising and advice given out by crisis pregnancy centers run by pro-life groups.  Supporters say they’re trying to protect the First Amendment free speech rights of volunteers and staff at the centers.  The sponsor, State Rep. Chuck Gatschenberger (R, Lake St. Louis), admits it’s a preemptive move.

via Flickr | jennlynndesign

Women seeking prescriptions for abortion-inducing drugs could face greater requirements than those wanting surgical abortions under a bill endorsed by the Missouri House.

Missouri law already requires a woman to have a consultation with a doctor or qualified professional 24 hours before undergoing an abortion.

The bill given initial approval Tuesday would require a woman to receive a physical examination by a doctor 24 hours before the doctor prescribes the abortion-inducing drug RU-486.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Shimkus on Obama's State of the Union address

President Barack Obama delivered an election-year message to Republicans: Game on.

The GOP - in Congress and on the campaign trail - signaled it's ready for the fight.

In his State of the Union address Tuesday night, Obama issued a populist call for income equality that echoed the Occupy Wall Street movement. He also challenged GOP lawmakers to work with him or move aside so he could use the power of the presidency to produce results for an electorate uncertain whether he deserves another term.

(via Flickr/lilhelen)

The Illinois Supreme Court has agreed to consider a dispute over whether the state must begin enforcing a law requiring parents to be notified before their children can obtain an abortion.

The law dates back to 1995 but has never been enforced because of various court actions.

It would require doctors to notify the guardians of a girl 17 or younger before she has an abortion. There are exceptions for emergencies and cases of sexual abuse, and girls could bypass the notification requirement by going to a judge.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Pat Quinn says he thinks Cardinal Francis George and other Catholic leaders "made a mistake" criticizing the governor for agreeing to present an award at a ceremony hosted by an abortion-rights organization.

Quinn on Monday said he wishes George would have contacted him before issuing a statement saying the governor was rewarding those who support "the legal right to kill children in their mothers' wombs." Quinn is to present rape victim Jennie Goodman with an award at a luncheon hosted by Personal PAC, which aims to elect pro-choice candidates.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Most of the new laws passed by the Missouri General Assembly this year officially took effect over the weekend, on August 28.

They include the controversial ban on late-term abortions that Governor Jay Nixon (D) allowed to become law without his signature.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 2:05 p.m. with comment from Nixon.

Updated 4:19 p.m. with comment from Planned Parenthood and Rep. Tim Jones.

Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon says he will let a controversial measure that puts further restrictions on abortions performed after 20 weeks become law without his signature.

The state already bans late-term abortions unless the life or health of the mother is in danger. That includes mental health.

flickr/MoNewsHorizon

Tilley officially launches campaign

Missouri House Speaker Steven Tilley has formally launched his campaign for lieutenant governor. Tilley says he is starting off with more than $1 million in his campaign account.

Tilley, a Republican from Perryville, officially announced his candidacy Thursday for Missouri's second-ranking executive post. It comes as no surprise, because Tilley had changed his fundraising committee to reflect his bid for lieutenant governor last December.

slprnews

So-called "Late-Term" Abortion Ban Goes to Governor Nixon

The bill passed Thursday by the Missouri House would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is not viable, or that it constitutes a medical threat to the mother.  The bill's supporters call abortions performed on viable fetuses barbaric. 

Democrat Tishaura Jones of St. Louis opposed the bill, saying she's pro-life for herself but pro-choice for everyone else:

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Note: descriptions of abortion procedures contained in this post may be disturbing to some.

Legislation that would ban so-called “late-term” abortions in Missouri is on its way to Governor Jay Nixon.

The bill passed today by the Missouri House would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is not viable, or that it constitutes a medical threat to the mother.  The bill was passed by the Missouri Senate last month.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Missouri Senate has passed legislation imposing more restrictions on late-term abortions.

The legislation would remove a general exception for a woman's health from a current state law banning abortions of viable fetuses. Instead, the legislation would allow such abortions only when the woman's life is endangered or when pregnancy risks permanent damage to a major bodily function.

Opening Day in St. Louis  is Here

Albert Pujols is about to begin what could be his final season with the St. Louis Cardinals. The team expects a rousing welcome for the three-time NL MVP, even though Pujols is playing hardball off the field. Year 11 for Pujols, all with the Cardinals, begins today at Busch Stadium against the San Diego Padres. Game time is 3:15 p.m.

House Redistricting Map Would Eliminate Third District

(Flickr/Cast a Line)

East St. Louis School District Sends Layoff Notices to 237 Teachers

In an effort to save $9 million, the East St. Louis Board voted Tuesday to notify 287 teachers that they might not be hired back next year. That’s according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The district serves about 7,300 students and has 562 full-time teachers.

The district is also proposing to close three schools.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House has passed legislation to ban so-called “late term” abortions in the Show-Me State.

The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is either not viable or is a medical threat to the mother.

  • According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay announced late last night that the city will lay off 30 firefighters. Chief of Staff Jeff Rainford says the city will cut 24 more positions through attrition, bringing the cuts to nearly 10 percent of the departments 600 firefighters. Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson says the layoffs will not impact public safety.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri House committee has passed a bill that would bar abortions of fetuses deemed capable of living outside the womb.

The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is either not viable or is a medical threat to the mother.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee heard testimony today on a bill that would make it illegal to abort a fetus deemed capable of living outside the womb.

The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks unless two doctors verify that a fetus is either not viable or constitutes a medical threat to the mother.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: August 6, 2008 - Last night's primary election saw the opening moves of a new battle taking place among the Republican Party's pro-life constituency.

The scuffle is brewing between Missouri Right to Life (MRL), the long-established standard bearer of the pro-life political community and Missourians United for Life (MUL), a new upstart group with the implicit backing of the Republican Party leadership.

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