Alzheimer's

Law Enforcement
11:12 am
Mon August 5, 2013

St. Charles County Sheriff’s Dept. Rolls Out New Program To Track Residents Who Wander

conner395 Flickr

Starting today the St. Charles County Sheriff’s Department is rolling out a new tool aimed at helping authorities locate residents who have wandered away from caregivers.

St. Charles County residents can purchase a wristband with a radio tracking device that law enforcement can then use to locate people who have wandered away from their homes.

Deputy Sheriff Steve Case said the new system has proven effective in other parts of the country.

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St. Louis on the Air
2:03 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Finding Balance And Dignity Among The Chaos Of Dementia

PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease
US National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Dementia is the broad term which refers to diseases which result in a significant loss of cognitive ability.

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the worst manifestations of dementia.

A symposium at Washington University in St. Louis this week aims to be a gathering place for people struggling to find balance and dignity among the chaos of dementia.

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Alzheimer's Disease
3:58 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Another Study Supports Link Between Alzheimer's And (Poor) Sleep

(via Wikimedia Commons)

Another study has shown a link between disrupted sleep patterns and Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers at Washington University looked at 32 people who have what’s known as “preclinical” Alzheimer’s disease. They have a marker in their spinal fluid associated with Alzheimer’s, but they still don’t have any symptoms of dementia.

Wash U neurologist and sleep specialist Yo-El Ju says when she and her colleagues compared those people to 110 healthy controls, they found the two groups slept about the same amount.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:01 pm
Thu January 3, 2013

Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease: Former Chesterfield Woman Writes Memoir

Author Stefania Silvestri
Alex Monti Fox

When Stefania Silvestri was 14 years old and living in Chesterfield, her father, who was 48 years old, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

At that time Silvestri, her mother, and two sisters became caregivers.

Host Don Marsh talked with Silvestri about her struggle at such a young age and how her father progressed into more severe forms of dementia.  Her memoir is, “Beside the Mountain: Finding Strength and Courage Through My Father's Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease.”

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Alzheimer's Disease
5:35 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Study To Test Drugs Aimed At Preventing Alzheimer’s Dementia

The areas where the most Alzheimer’s plaques typically form are highlighted in red and yellow on these brain scans.
Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD, Tyler Blazey/Washington University

Washington University will soon lead a clinical trial aimed at preventing people with Alzheimer’s disease from developing dementia.

The international trial will involve 160 patients in the U.S., Europe, and Australia who have a very rare, inherited form of Alzheimer’s, which typically causes dementia before age 50.

Washington University neurologist and study lead Dr. Randall Bateman says this is one of the first clinical trials to try to treat Alzheimer’s patients before they have any symptoms.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:49 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

New Research In Preventing Alzheimer's Disease

PET scan of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease
US National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Finding effective treatments and a cure for Alzheimer’s disease is elusive.  While most of what we hear about the disease is depressing, we may be on the threshold of some exciting discoveries concerning prevention.  Washington University’s School of Medicine is in the middle of this new research and this hour, host Don Marsh is joined by Dr. John Morris, Director of Washington University’s Alzheimer’s Research Center, to talk about clinical trials aimed at preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

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4:29 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Gene mutation offers clue for drugs to stave off Alzheimer's

Lead in text: 
In addition to the story we reported this afternoon, NPR's Jon Hamilton offers this report on another development in Alzheimer's research.
  • Source: Npr
  • | Via: NPR
Finally, there's some good news about Alzheimer's disease. It turns out that a few lucky people carry a genetic mutation that greatly reduces their risk of getting the disease, an Icelandic team reports in the journal Nature . The mutation also seems to protect people who don't have Alzheimer's disease from the cognitive decline that typically occurs with age.
Alzheimer's Disease
4:00 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

New research takes step toward catching Alzheimer's early

Brain scans illustrating the changes occurring in brains of those who carry inherited Alzheimer's disease, even decades before symptoms surface.
The New England Journal of Medicine ©2012

A new study led by Washington University confirms that the brains of people with a very rare, early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease begin to change long before they first show signs of dementia.

The research brings us a step closer to early diagnosis of the more common type Alzheimer's that produces symptoms after age 60.

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Mo. State budget
3:50 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Mo. House debating FY2013 state budget

Mo. House chamber
(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri House is debating all 13 bills this afternoon that make up the state’s proposed budget for next year.

Lawmakers are offering up several amendments to the budget – one in particular would have shifted $150,000 from the state’s biodiesel fund to Alzheimer’s patients.  It was sponsored by State Rep. Tracy McCreery (I, Olivette).

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Alzheimer's disease
4:23 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Study: new Alzheimer’s marker can predict rate of memory loss

This image from the National Institute on Aging shows the difference between the tissue structure of a healthy brain (at left) and a brain severely affected by Alzheimer's disease.
(Image courtesy National Institute on Aging)

A new marker for Alzheimer's disease can be used to predict how quickly a patient will develop memory loss and other symptoms of dementia.

Researchers at Washington University measured levels of a marker called visinin-like protein 1 in in the spinal fluid of 60 patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's then tracked their symptoms for three years.

Neurologist Dr. Rawan Tarawneh, now at the University of Jordan, led the study.

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