Anheuser-Busch InBev

Grant's Farm bridge with sign thanking attendees for visiting
William K. Busch Brewing Company

The saga over who will own Grant’s Farm continues. Four Busch family siblings have offered to purchase the farm for $26 million and continue operations as they currently exist. 

In an announcement the siblings said public response to the ongoing question of ownership motivated their offer.

Katelyn Petrin | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” host Don Marsh discussed the year in business happenings in the area — from Cortex to coal to NGA — with the reporters who know the subject best.

A-B InBev CEO Carlos Brito testifies before a Senate committee Tuesday morning.
Jim Howard | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 9:13 a.m. Dec. 8 with Brito testimony - A-B InBev’s Brito defends acquisition of SABMiller, and says it should not alter domestic beer market.

AB InBev CEO, Carlos Brito says the company’s planned purchase of SABMiller is about expanding “the reach of iconic American brands such as Budweiser” to new markets around the world, “particularly in Africa, Asia and Central and South America.”

Grant's Farm - horses
Robert Duffy | St. Louis Public Radio

Plans for the St. Louis Zoo to buy Grant’s Farm are in legal limbo. Six heirs of August Anheuser "Gussie" Busch Jr. are in litigation over whether the property should be sold to the Zoo or Billy Busch. A hearing was held today - largely on the timing of how things will proceed.

The St. Louis Zoo is making plans to acquire the family attraction Grant’s Farm from the Busch Family Real Estate Trust.

Bevo fox on one of the old Anheuser-Busch buildings
Tom Nagel | St. Louis Beacon file photo

Updated 9:33 a.m. , Nov. 11 with announcement of formal offer -

Anheuser-Busch InBev has put forth a formal offer to takeover rival brewer SABMiller. The announcement follows word last month that the companies had an agreement in principle on a deal worth more than $100 billion.

In an effort to clear regulatory hurdles in the U.S., Molson Coors will buy out SABMiller's interest in a joint venture. That means A-B InBev, which brews Budweiser, will not own SABMiller's U.S. business or the global rights to the Miller brand.

Anheuser-Busch InBev Logo
AB InBev

Analysts are predicting a portion of SABMiller would likely have to be divested if a deal with Anheuser-Busch InBev comes to fruition.

The world’s two largest brewers are exploring the possibility of a combined company, which some industry observers believe would be valued around $250 billion.

(Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio)

A tractor trailer from Anheuser-Busch’s St. Louis brewery will be hard to miss.

The trucks have gone green, both literally and figuratively.

The beer giant announced Tuesday that it’s converted 97 diesel tractor trucks to compressed natural gas. To highlight the change, all of the trucks now sport a bright green exterior and Anheuser-Busch’s “Seed to Sip” logo.

(Flickr/Philip Leara)

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(via Flickr/ChrisYunker)

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(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The beer industry has been transformed by the rise of craft brews in recent years, and St. Louis is no exception; it’s home to microbreweries like Schlafly, Four Hands, and Urban Chestnut.

Now St. Louis mainstay Anheuser-Busch, after being bought by Inbev, is pushing to retain its dominance in the U.S. among a new generation of beer connoisseurs—people like Jeff Wolf and Kelly McKee.

Anheuser-Busch InBev

Anheuser-Busch InBev has completed its $20.1 billion purchase of Mexican brewer Grupo Modelo.

The world's largest brewer has been trying for almost a year to buy the half of Modelo that it did not already own. The Department of Justice initially blocked the deal, concerned that it would hurt U.S. beer shoppers' choices, but signed off on the combination after AB InBev agreed to sell Modelo's entire U.S. business to a wine maker, Constellation Brands Inc.

Anheuser-Busch InBev

The Department of Justice announced on Friday that it has reached an official settlement with Anheuser-Busch InBev and Grupo Modelo.  The deal will allow AB InBev to proceed with its $20 billion purchase of the Mexican brewer.

AB InBev, has been trying to complete a buyout of Modelo, maker of the popular Corona brand, since last June.

The Department of Justice sued to block the purchase out of concerns the deal would put too much price control in the hands of two companies, AB InBev and MillerCoors. 

(via Flickr/ Jirka Matousek)

Beer giant Anheuser Busch has reached a deal with the Justice Department that will allow the company to purchase Mexican brewer Grupo Modelo.

AB InBev announced last June its plans to purchase the half of Grupo Modelo it did not already own for $20 billion. The federal government filed suit in January, saying the deal would drive up beer prices.

Update at 7:35 p.m. ET: Beer Is At Full Strength, Tests Say

Samples of Budweiser and other Anheuser-Busch InBev beers were found to be in line with their advertised alcohol content, according to lab tests conducted at NPR's request. We've rewritten portions of this post to reflect that new information.

Anheuser-Busch is accused of misleading beer drinkers about the alcohol content of Budweiser and other products, in a series of class-action lawsuits filed in federal court.

(via Flickr/TMQ.st.louis)

Updated 3:34 p.m.

Beer lovers across the country have filed $5 million class-action lawsuits accusing Anheuser-Busch of watering down its Budweiser, Michelob and other brands.

The suits were filed in Pennsylvania, California and other states on behalf of consumers allegedly cheated out of the beverage's stated alcohol content. Budweiser and Michelob each boast being 5 percent alcohol, while some "light" versions are said to be just over 4 percent.

The boards of American Airlines and US Airways just approved a merger of the two airlines. But the deal still has to win the approval of antitrust regulators at the Justice Department — regulators who last month sued to stop a merger between the beer giants Anheuser-Busch InBev and Grupo Modelo, which brews Corona.

The antitrust division has dozens of economists on staff. Their job, essentially, is to figure out whether a merger would reduce competition so much that a company could raise prices without losing business to competitors.

Antitrust Lawsuit Filed Against Anheuser-Busch InBev

Jan 31, 2013
(via Flickr/TMQ.st.louis)

The U.S. Department of Justice has filed an anti-trust lawsuit against Anheuser-Busch InBev.

The government alleges the company's plans to purchase  Mexican brewer, Grupo Modelo, would give AB-InBev monopoly power to set prices.

Bill Baer, DOJ's top anti-trust official said the removing Modelo as an aggressive competitor to Anheuser-Busch InBev would give the company too much leverage to drive up prices.

(via Flickr/darastar)

The famous “Budweiser” sign on the St. Louis brewery will start to come down on Monday.

But, have no fear - a new, brighter one will replace it in a few weeks.

The current sign on Anheuser-Busch’s Bevo Building has been up since 1979.

General Manager Jeff Pitts says it was getting susceptible to bad weather.

AB-InBev Rolls Out New "Black Crown" Budweiser

Jan 21, 2013
Anheuser-Busch InBev

Budweiser Black Crown, the latest of Anheuser-Busch's higher-alcohol beers, will hit shelves across the country on Monday.  The beer has been sold in St. Louis for several weeks now.

The new recipe is the result of a challenge, called “Project 12” among the company’s 12 brewmasters.

The new take on classic Bud features a stronger hop flavor and higher alcohol content, about 6 percent.

Benj Steinman, editor of Beer Marketer’s Insights says the move comes as mass-market brands face increasing pressure from craft beer, wine and spirits.

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