archeology

Geologists from the University of Wisconsin extrude a 6-meter sediment core from the deepest point of Horseshoe Lake.
Sam Munoz | University of Wisconsin

The people who built and lived among the tall, sculpted mounds now preserved at Cahokia Mounds Historic Site have long presented a mystery to archeologists.

One of the biggest mysteries: Why did they leave?

A team of geographers studying pollen deposits buried in the sediment under Horseshoe Lake may have stumbled upon new evidence that helps explain Cahokia’s decline.  

The answers are in the lake butter

Courtesy of AIA Website

The board of the St. Louis Society of the Archaeological Institute of America has resigned following a dispute over plans to sell a collection of Egyptian items.

The group turned to members with previous experience to fill interim slots. Past president (2009) Linda Bickel took over as president, and former president K. Ann Dempsey (1995) joined the board. Neither was available for comment.

The resignations came in accordance with the demands of the national Archaeological Institute of America. 

Priscilla Baltimore
Courtesy of the Illinois State Archeological Survey

For more than 150 years, people have told the tale of  "Mother" Priscilla Baltimore, a former slave who is said to have led 11 families of fugitive and free African Americans to establish a free community in what is now Brooklyn, Ill.

In September, members of the the Illinois State Archeological Survey set out see if they could find evidence to back up the story.