art

Alfredo Jaar, The Geometry of Conscience, 2010. A woman standing before silhouettes of heads.
Kemper Art Museum

An exhibit at Washington University’s Kemper Museum — In the Aftermath of Trauma: Contemporary Video Installations —  introduces painful political conflicts to St. Louis museum goers at oblique angles.

Salon 53

Perseverance and triumph in St. Louis history will be explored in a new exhibition, opening today at Salon 53, a private art gallery in north St. Louis.

Provided by SLAM

Word from the Art Museum sent me looking for more information.

First the release: “The Saint Louis Art Museum presents Anything but Civil: Kara Walker’s Vision of the Old South. Kara Walker, the recipient of the prestigious MacArthur fellowship in 1997, is internationally renowned for her black-paper cut-out silhouettes of the American South. The free exhibition opens in Galleries 234 and 235 on Feb. 26.”

Reflection: Nicole Eisenman's Broad Range On View At CAM

Feb 13, 2014
Nicole Eisenman, Sloppy Bar Room Kiss, 2011. Oil on canvas, 39 x 48 inches. Collection of Cathy and Jonathan Miller. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer
Provided by CAM

Those who say they do not understand contemporary art or who question the talent needed to create the art they encounter need to see the work of Nicole Eisenman. The survey of her last 20 years of painting, sculpture, print and drawing at the Contemporary Art Museum (CAM) is powerful enough to singlehandedly answer these sort of rumbles. She clearly knows how to draw, how to paint and has something to say.

Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts
Provided by the foundation

In a recent conversation with my daughter, who works in the arts, I said that I liked to know about the artist before seeing his or her work.

She disagreed, saying that the art should be experienced on its own by each person. Expectations could cloud the impressions created.

I understand her view, but coming into something cold makes me feel vulnerable (which I’m sure she would say is a good thing) and the journalist in me wants to have done homework.

Mustard Seed Theater

Alicia Reve' Like plays Nella, a bright patch in an Alabama family whose quilts tell stories of segregation and the civil rights movement.

Last February, Alicia Reve' Like portrayed a motel maid who whooped up on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the Black Rep’s “The Mountaintop,” the story of King’s last hours.

Private Collection / courtesy Kodner Gallery

To celebrate the 250th anniversary of St. Louis, the Sheldon Art Galleries has organized a major exhibition depicting the founding of the city and the people involved. Imagining the Founding of St. Louis includes paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture by a variety of noted artists.

Sheldon Art Galleries Director and co-curator of the exhibit Olivia Lahs-Gonzales commented, “Obviously this all happened before the advent of photography so there was no photographer on the boat with the explorers, so it’s really left up to artists to kind of imagine what it was like.”

Table and Chairs
Duet Gallery

A table can connect families, foster discussion or encourage a game of cards. This weekend, a table in Grand Center also provides a canvas for artistic and cultural expression.

“Table” opened Thursday night at the new Duet art space, 3526 Washington Ave., with an evening of drinks and folk music. Friday night at 7, the custom wood design by Martin Goebel becomes the stage for a new media performance.

The exhibit's postcard is from Virginia Terpening, Morning Prayer (Self-Portrait), nd.  Oil on board. 28 x 17 inches
Provided by The Hinge

The Hinge Gallery’s Eileen G’Sell and Bryan Laughlin have organized an exhibit of artist Virginia Terpening’s newly discovered work. The show’s title, Yes Virginia, There is… is “an affirmation: of the value of an artist making art for the sake of making it, of the possibility that art from a marginalized vantage can endure as accessible to all.”

Provided by Fort Gondo

Two shows – one by up-and-coming artist and poet John Cummins and Aron Fisher; the other by established St. Louis art world fixtures Buzz Spector and Mary Jo Bang --share more than architecture at the neighboring Fort Gondo and Beverly galleries. These two-person art exhibits, Conversed and Otherwise, pair text and art object that are increasingly interesting as they are explored.

Otherwise

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