Arts And Culture

Katy Peace, right in striped top, at an earlier pickup event
Provided by Community Supported Art

Katy Peace, founder and lead organizer of Community Supported Art - Saint Louis, joined “Cityscape” host Steve Potter along with artists Ruth Reese and Brandon Daniels to discuss the organization’s second season.

Community Supported Art provides aspiring artists with an opportunity and financial support to complete their projects. The CSA operates as a subscription service and helps artists sell their work.

James and Brea McAnally in the work in progress at the new Luminary Center for the Arts.
Nora Ibrahim | St. Louis Public Radio Intern

This fall the National Endowment for the Arts awarded nine St. Louis-based arts organizations a total of $250,000 in grants. But in the visual arts category, only The Luminary Arts Center on Cherokee Street got funding. Thanks to the new NEA grant the space will expand its international artist residency program. Brea McAnally runs the space with her husband, James. They say the award is a national spotlight for the space.

“Primarily we’re just grateful that the organization has been seen and validated on a national level,” said Brea McAnally.

The African Diaspora Council Inc. is holding its first annual Nelson Mandela celebration this weekend. The event marks Nelson Mandela's 96th birthday. 

The African Diaspora Council’s event includes a dinner, a cultural performance, a 6K run and a soccer tournament.  

The tournament, which is scheduled for Saturday evening, will feature four teams representing different countries.  The teams will consist of players of varying African descent and other local community members.

Brett Williams
Stephanie Zimmerman | St. Louis Public Radio intern

What kind of music goes with a video of sitting on the toilet naked while eating peanut butter out of a jar? That question — back in the late 1990s — ultimately led St. Louis artist Brett Williams to the sound sculptures he creates today.

While at the School of The Art Institute in Chicago, Williams launched what he calls the Brett Commercials, a video series that includes “Brett Lives Alone,” featuring his bathroom snacking against a whistling-clanking soundtrack.

The Pulitzer, photographer David Johnson

What is St. Louis doing to combat climate change? And how can art and design move those plans forward?

The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts wants to publicize ongoing efforts and encourage new collaborations in its Marfa Dialogues competition. Winners will receive $2,500 and the opportunity to display their ideas in a public forum, which may take many forms, including exhibitions, readings, concerts and film screenings.

Table and Chairs
Duet Gallery

A table can connect families, foster discussion or encourage a game of cards. This weekend, a table in Grand Center also provides a canvas for artistic and cultural expression.

“Table” opened Thursday night at the new Duet art space, 3526 Washington Ave., with an evening of drinks and folk music. Friday night at 7, the custom wood design by Martin Goebel becomes the stage for a new media performance.

James McAnally
Provided by M. McAnally

The Luminary Center for the Arts credits numerous supporters, volunteers and long-range thinking for the purchase of its own building.

To be successful in the arts, a business head can be as important as a creative mind.

Wikipedia

A report released this afternoon by St. Louis city prosecutor Jennifer Joyce has cleared the Missouri History Museum of all allegations of criminal activity. But the report also scolded the museum for questionable behaviors.

Erin Williams

With signs in neon lights, fire hydrants that resemble anything but, and murals and metal sculptures abound, it’s a safe bet to say that The Grove neighborhood is one that thrives heavily on appearance. Much of its open and colorful aesthetic can be attributed to Grace McCammond, an artist who has been creating murals and adding color to fire hydrants and signal boxes in the neighborhood for the past nine years.

“If it holds still pretty much I’ll paint it,” she says.

Missouri's budget shortfall has been felt everywhere from schools to state agencies to social service programs. Arts groups across St. Louis haven't been spared, either. Many are adjusting to the new reality of decreasing financial support from the state at a time when resources remain tight.