Arts & Culture

Inside Dead Wax Records on Cherokee Street
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

There’s good news for local vinyl record stores. Vinyl sales are up 50 percent this past year as we enter the peak shopping season. A number of music store owners say the increase results from a new generation discovering that vinyl offers a widely different audio experience than streaming services.

“It’s nice to be able to have everything on a system or a phone, or an iPad or a computer, but when it comes down to it the really special records are the ones that you have to hold in your hand and you have to listen to them,” said Tim Hendrickson of Dead Wax records on Cherokee.

Austin Fuller | Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

The Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis’ premier open event of the season is this weekend, Nov. 27-29. The 2015 Thanksgiving Open will showcase a $10,000 guaranteed prize fund and challenge participants in six grueling rounds of G/90 + 30s/move in top-level action.

This event will draw big names from both the local and national chess scene and is rivaled only by the St. Louis Open for biggest Chess Club Open tournament of the year.

Max and Louie Productions

Renowned singer, actor, playwright and St. Louisan Ken Page describes it like this: “There’s a point in the play where one of the characters says ‘It’s like that captain of the football team that you fell in love with or that boy whose green eyes you still see when you close yours…you know the one.’ It’s that thing, that’s what it’s based on.”

The ‘it’ in that description is “Sublime Intimacy,” the name of Page’s new play for Max and Louie Productions, which will have its world premiere on Friday, Dec. 4 at the Kranzberg Arts Center.

Music, candles, delicious food and drink: all normal parts of a delightful and atmospheric holiday gathering. For the Greenleaf Singers and the Not-Ready-For-Reformation Players the gathering also includes “comely wenches and sturdy lads” as well as Renaissance-era songs of the season.

Turkeys are basted, stuffing is stuffed, the green bean casserole is in the oven—Thanksgiving is just around the corner. There’s just one more thing to consider: How should you handle difficult and oftentimes divisive subject matter that comes up at the Thanksgiving dinner table?

Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum

Defeat is not one of the primary words associated with Sir Winston Churchill’s career. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953, he gave the prophetic “Iron Curtain Speech” at Westminster College in 1946, and, most importantly, he emerged victorious during World War II as the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. What many people don’t know is that Churchill did in fact experience the agony of defeat…and that’s what fueled his second life as a painter.

StoryCorps, the nonprofit project which works to collect oral stories from everyday Americans, is beckoning people to “listen to their elders” this Thanksgiving weekend and record a story through their new mobile app. The project is called “The Great Thanksgiving Listen.”


A key component of CityArchRiver’s redevelopment project is now complete. Luther Ely Smith Square and an adjacent land bridge spanning Interstate 44 opened to the public on Wednesday.

The upgraded greenspace is designed to better connect the Gateway Arch grounds to the rest of downtown. Improvements include more than 300 feet of benches, new lighting and 220 additional trees.

Model of entrance markers for Forest Park
Ben Senturia

A largely ornamental $3 million construction program announced this summer for Forest Park -- one presented as a way to provide visitors a comprehensive idea what that big, leafy, attractive expanse of woodlands, savannas, golf courses, ball fields, fish ponds and cultural institutions between Kingshighway and Skinker actually is -- made a full-scale move ahead when prototypical models of gates, or entrance markers, appeared at two places.

The Campbell House Museum

On Thanksgiving, every year from 1906 until 1931, a luscious, mysterious Thanksgiving dinner would appear before the children living at Father Dunne’s Newsboys Home and Protectorate, formerly located at 3010 Washington Ave. in downtown St. Louis. The home was a place for orphaned or homeless boys, often newsboys, who were too old to take shelter at typical orphanages.

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Reedy Press

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

When Shatha Alshati had her first American Thanksgiving dinner, there was one particular item on her plate that gave her pause: the turkey. The former Iraqi refugee who arrived here in 2009, said that while there are turkeys in her home country, they aren’t frequently eaten. 

A U.S. citizen as of April 2015, Alshati has perfected the art of serving a golden roasted turkey at the Thanksgiving dinners she now hosts.

Grant's Farm - horses
Robert Duffy | St. Louis Public Radio

Plans for the St. Louis Zoo to buy Grant’s Farm are in legal limbo. Six heirs of August Anheuser "Gussie" Busch Jr. are in litigation over whether the property should be sold to the Zoo or Billy Busch. A hearing was held today - largely on the timing of how things will proceed.

John Stegeman, 18, helped design and build a Mars rover-style robot for the Science Centerexhibit
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The Curiosity rover is cruising toward a specific set of sand dunes on Mars millions of miles across the universe. The St. Louis Science Center is trying to bring that science down to Earth.

A new exhibit aims to explain both the science and the thought process behind the Curiosity Mars rover, according to Paul Freiling, director of engineering and technology education at the center. For him, the scope of Curiosity’s responsibilities illustrate how problem-solving in space is the productive of cooperative minds.

Don Wolff
Wiley Price | St. Louis American

Don Wolff, a noted defense attorney and long-time jazz enthusiast died Friday, Nov. 20, of leukemia at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.  On Oct. 2, 2012, Terry Perkins wrote a profile of Mr. Wolff for the St. Louis Beacon, talking to him about his signature phrase: “I’m Don Wolff … and I love jazz” and where it came from. Wolff talks about jazz, when he was awarded the Jazz Hero Award in April 2015.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for November 22 will be “The Keys and Strings Hour + New Music.”  The Keys and Strings hour will present piano trios and solos with Jessica Williams, Joanne Brackeen, Hiromi, Dawn Clement, Irene Schweizer, Marilyn Crispell, Kris Davis and the Mary Lou Williams Collective.  New music for November will be from St. Louisans Peter Martin and Dom Thomas, along with Cassandra Wilson, Erroll Garner, Kenny Wheeler, Christian Scott, Charles Mingus, Joel Harrison and Spirit House, Jeff Jenkins, Adam Niewood and Kamasi Washington.

St. Louis-based Foxing released its album "Dealer" a couple weeks ago to solid critical reception. The band’s music is filled with swells and melody. The lyrics focus on expansive topics like war and death filtered through a highly personal lens. With it getting dark earlier and the first snowfall imminent, this seems like a time to explore the slightly morbid sensibility that underpins the sweeps and builds of music from similar St. Louis "indie rock" bands.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Earlier this year, local singer-songwriter legend Pokey LaFarge’s sixth studio album, “Something in the Water,” dropped. He’s been going ever since. Recently completing a U.S. and a European tour across three continents, he’s barely had a chance to catch his breath.

“I think I have moved into a new definition of pleasant exhaustion,” LaFarge said on Friday’s “Cityscape.” “I just got in at 3:30 this morning from Nashville.”

Salma Arastu

Artist Salma Arastu knows a thing or two about intercultural communication. She was born in India and raised in Hinduism before embracing Islam through her marriage. Now, she uses that melded faith background to build religious bridges through her artwork: Arabic calligraphy melded with abstract expressionist paintings.