Arts & Culture | St. Louis Public Radio

Arts & Culture

Sauce Magazine is out with their 2017 Guide to the Holidays.
(Courtesy: Sauce Magazine)

Thanksgiving Day is one of the biggest days of the year for cooking and entertaining. Our friends at Sauce Magazine are back for our monthly edition of Sound Bites and have tips for cooking, hosting and attending events this Thursday.

Cuban Jazz Musicians

Nov 20, 2017

For November 19, 2017, Jazz Unlimited preented "Cuban Jazz Musicians."   Jelly Roll Morton called the Cuban influence on jazz “The Spanish Tinge.”  These musicians have been involved in jazz since the beginning.  Cuban Albert Socarras played the first jazz flute solo in 1927. The music by Socorras, Chucho Valdes, Chano Pozo, Dafnis Prieto, Hilario Duran, Mongo Santamaria, Machito, Irakere, Arturo Sandoval, Paquito D'Rivera, Mario Baiza, Gonzalo Rubalcaba, Candido Camero, Chico O'Farrill, Harold Lopez-Nussa, Fabian Almazan and Alex Acuna was heard.

Lara Hamdan / St. Louis Public Radio

Anyone who’s spent time in New York City knows that if you want to get to Harlem, you take the A train. That is the title of a special program paying tribute to the Harlem Renaissance – when black entertainment culture exploded in Harlem in the form of poetry, music and comedy.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked about a local production celebrating the artistic achievements of African-Americans during the Harlem Renaissance. It will feature jazz, blues, poetry and storytelling.

Jazz singer Cecile McLorin Salvant
Mark Fitton | Courtesy of the artist

When jazz vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant takes the stage Saturday at the Sheldon Concert Hall in St. Louis, she won't be trying to sing as her storied predecessors might have.

Though the virtuoso performer has been hailed as a successor to such greats as Ella Fitzgerald and Betty Carter, she is very much a contemporary singer. Salvant, a Haitian-American who grew up in Miami, has grown to love jazz standards, show tunes and songs many might miss, like the Kurt Weill/Langston Hughes piece "Somehow I Could Never Believe."

But the 28-year-old also writes original compositions and through her singing wants to make her own statement about the music's past, present and future.

One of 45 images selected for display at the organizations new space.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

While selecting images for the art show “On the Street Where I Live,” Amanda Verbeck of Pele Prints saw certain themes emerge in artists submissions: impermanence, restlessness, transition and instability.

She wants the show at Webster Arts to explore the places where people live and their relationships with their neighbors.

Lara Hamdan / St. Louis Public Radio

Classical Indian dance is a traditional art form with roots in India that date back over 2,000 years. The rhythmic dance often tells stories with body movements, facial expressions and symbolic clothing.

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Dances of India members about the history and tradition of their dance. The company was founded in St. Louis in 1976 and was the first of its kind established in Missouri. 

Protesters stand together on Kingshighway Friday night as police officers in riot gear move toward them.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

A common refrain among protesters who took to the streets of St. Louis in recent weeks has been “I know that we will win!”

Many are confident that the demonstrations that took place following a judge’s decision to find former St. Louis officer Jason Stockley not guilty in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith will help win the fight to stop police from killing black people.

September 12, 2017 photo. Shakespeare in the Streets' "Blow, Winds," inspired by "King Lear," is staged on the steps of the St. Louis Public Library, Central Library, downtown.
Shakespeare Festival St. Louis

The cast and crew of this year’s Shakespeare in the Streets production worked for a year to bring its take on the Bard’s “King Lear” to the steps of the St. Louis Public Library’s Central Library, downtown.

But the Sept. 15 opening day of “Blow, Winds” coincided with another big event in St. Louis: Judge Timothy Wilson's non-guilty verdict in the murder case against Jason Stockley. Shakespeare Festival St. Louis canceled the weekend run amid protests against the verdict.

Theatergoers will have a chance to see it next summer. The festival plans to present “Blow, Winds” June 15-16, in connection with its annual event in Forest Park.

World Champion Magnus Carlsen at the Champions Showdown in St. Louis
Lennart Ootes | Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis

Eight of the top players in the world headlined the recently completed Champions Showdown in Saint Louis.

The Saint Louis Chess Club has been hosting exhibition matches each November for the past few years as a more experimental and fun scenario, having formats that are not the traditional way of playing chess at the top level.

Gigi Benson / Contributed Photo

Some of the most famous photographs of past celebrities were taken by one man – photo journalist Harry Benson. He’s photographed all the presidents since Eisenhower, Bobby Kennedy’s assassination and Richard Nixon’s resignation.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to 87-year-old Scottish-born Benson about his iconic career.

Lara Hamdan / St. Louis Public Radio

A full story of what ifs and comedies: A history of the St. Louis Browns

St. Louis’ baseball history includes one of the best teams in baseball history, the Cardinals — and the worst— the Browns.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the history of the St. Louis Browns baseball team with Ed Wheatley, one of the authors of “St. Louis Browns: The Story of a Beloved Team.”

Silver tiles can be scene beneith the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center.
Provided by St. Louis Art Museum

The St. Louis Art Museum opens three different shows this month that use technology as a jumping point to explore politics or history.

Among the exhibits is one by world-renowned German photographer Thomas Struth, whose photographs include of wires, robot parts, and industrial machines. For him, researchers and scientists have managed to bring humanity together even while political crisis after political crisis unfolds.

File photo. Artist Solomon Thurman painted this piece of two African-American men, a police officer and a man wearing a Hands Up Don't Shoot shirt after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown.
File | Provided |Solomon Thurman

The Missouri Arts Council is honoring three St. Louisans and one local hot spot with its 2018 annual awards.

The council chose Solomon Thurman for its Individual Artist award. Thurman is perhaps best known for a piece air travelers see every day: the 51-foot-long “Black Americans in Flight” mural at St. Louis’ Lambert International Airport. He created the work in 1990 with his mentor, the late Spencer Taylor.

Jazz Unlimited November 12, 2017 was “Re-Imagining “Ain’t Misbehavin’, Honeysuckle Rose and Jitterbug Waltz.” Fats Waller composed many tunes, some of which are favorite vehicles for re-imagination in a variety of styles.  The musicians who played “Ain’t Misbehavin,” “Honeysuckle Rose” and “The Jitterbug Waltz” ranged from Waller himself to Anthony Braxton.

There are no photos for this show.

There is no video for this show.

The Archive for this show will be available until the morning of November 20, 2017.

Treasure Shields Redmond and Karen Yang at Yang's kitchen table.
Provided by Kristen Trudo

The kitchen table can be a place for conversation, nurturing and sustenance. Two St. Louisans are making the intimate space the source for an ambitious podcast.

With “Who Raised You?” Treasure Shields Redmond and Karen (Jia Lian) Yang hope to explore a variety of experiences.

“It’s like a springboard,” Shields Redmond said. “Because people cannot just talk about family … they can talk about rearing influences, the music, food, travel, everything!”

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: September 19, 2008 - Tiger Woods may get the most attention but Frisbee lovers use their favorite discs for a form of the traditional golf game that continues to gain popularity. The St. Louis area has many disc golf courses where holes become cages or lines painted on trees.

Those who play the sport say it is a low-cost way to satisfy any level of the competitive spirit.

Jeff Strong, a trumpeter with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, previously played in the U.S. Marine Band.
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

Former Staff Sgt. Jeff Strong enlisted in the Marines specifically to join the “President's Own” United States Marine Band. After completing his service, he now plays in the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra.

On Friday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked to Strong about his time in the Marine Band.

The Marine Band, founded in 1798 by an act of Congress, is the oldest continually-active professional music organization in the country. Its primary purpose is to provide music for the president of the United States and commandant of the Marine Corps.

Detail from a board that covered windows at Meshuggah Cafe on Delmar Blvd.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

As he drove down Delmar Boulevard in September, Tony Borchardt was struck by what he saw. Numerous painted boards lined the street in anticipation of more protests over a judge's decision to find former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley not guilty of murder in the death of Anthony Lamar Smith.

Hours earlier, a dean at Fontbonne University asked if Borchardt could organize an exhibit of art related to the event.  Looking around him, Borschart knew he’d found his show. 

The exhibit “Protest and Peace,” at the Fontbonne University Fine Art Gallery, features those painted boards from the Delmar Loop.

This is a portion of the cover of the new "Standing Up for Civil Rights" book for children.
Provided | Missouri History Museum

How do you condense more than 150 years of civil rights history in to a single book — and make it understandable and meaningful to a fifth grader?

St. Louisan Amanda Doyle and co-author Melanie Adams recently attempted to do just that, for their children's book, “Standing Up for Civil Rights in St. Louis.”  It starts in the 1800s with the stories of people who were enslaved, and ends with the 2014 shooting death of Michael Brown and the subsequent protests in Ferguson. But its message looks to the future, asking kids what they can do to change enduring problems facing African-Americans.

the 2016 U.S. Chess Olympiad team. From left to right, Alex Lenderman (coach), Hikaru Nakamura, John Donaldson (captain), Sam Shankland, Ray Robson, Wesley So, and Fabiano Caruana.
Mike Kelin | Chess.com

The biennial Chess Olympiad, the most important competition in the chess world outside the World Championship, has been held continuously since 1927, interrupted only by World War II. American teams have participated in 38 of the 42 competitions and won six.

Although the United States didn’t compete in the first event held in London in 1927, it quickly made its mark, finishing second at The Hague in 1928, and fourth in Hamburg two years later. That set the table for an incredible streak from 1931 to 1937, which saw the Americans win four consecutive Olympiads, the second longest run of success in the event’s history, eclipsed only by the Soviet Union from 1952-1974 and the Soviet Union/Russia from 1980-2002.

These photos were salvaged from a condemned home in the former Wendell-Phillips community in Kansas City.
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Lois Conley was a teenager when her parents lost their Mill Creek neighborhood home to eminent domain. A portion of her former backyard became Market Street after the city leveled the area in the name of progress.

Conley is the founder of St. Louis' Griot Museum of Black History, which sits across the street from the site of the future National Geospacial-Intelligence Agency, in a demolished area that was part of the  St. Louis Place neighborhood.

Through Dec. 15, the north St. Louis museum is hosting an exhibition exploring how the government’s power to condemn mostly black neighborhoods has affected people in St. Louis and Kansas City. Conley and photographer Matt Rahner co-curated the display.

Conley talked with St. Louis Public Radio’s Nancy Fowler about the exhibition, “Eminent Domain/Displaced,” as well as her personal experiences of more than 50 years ago.

Jess Luther / I Went to a Show

Jess Luther, a music expert who’s among the founders of the local music blog I Went to a Show, continues to highlight local musicians across several genres.

Luther, who also works in business operations at St. Louis Public Radio, featured up and coming artists with producer Alex Heuer on Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air. Luther premiered songs from local musicians and talked about their collaborations with each other.

Paige Alyssa’s “Worth It”

 

Work continues on the Soldiers Memorial in downtown St. Louis. The monument is set to reopen in time for Veterans Day 2018.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

Renovation of the Soldiers Memorial in downtown St. Louis is on schedule, and the monument will reopen just before Veterans Day 2018 — the centennial of the armistice that ended World War I, according to project leaders with the Missouri Historical Society.

Luzena Adams / Contributed Photo

When St. Louis native and comedian Kathleen Madigan did a show in St. Louis a while back, her family bought out the bar’s Bud Lights and Budweisers.

“Look, they’re not going to drink non-union beer,” she told the bartender. “You’re going to need to get in a car, and go to Schnucks or Kroger, whatever is open, and buy all the Bud Lights that they have.”

Madigan looks forward to performing in front of friends and family again at her upcoming standup show at The Peabody Opera House on Nov. 11 — as part of her national Boxed Wine & Bigfoot Tour.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: September 11, 2008 - It's hard to imagine that any atheists were converted to Christianity, or Christians to atheism, after listening to Dinesh D'Souza and Christopher Hitchens debate the topic "Is it good to believe in God?" Wednesday night. But most of the crowd of more than 2,000 people who crowded into Powell Hall seemed to enjoy the spirited exchange, and gave the speakers a rousing ovation at the end of the program, which lasted a little under two hours.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: September 3, 2008 - In the lobby of the Loretto-Hilton Center before the lights come up on stage, in the checkout lane at the grocery, or stopped along the street, I am often asked by patrons of The Rep what the “theme” for the upcoming season will be. What unifying philosophy or common thread is to be found among the many productions we will present over the next eight months?

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, November 5, 2017 will be “The Career of Lee Konitz.”  Saxophonist Lee Konitz has been performing on the international stage for 72 years.  He was known early in his career for associations with Claude Thornhill, Lennie Tristano, the Birth of the Cool band and Stan Kenton.  Konitz has forged a long career in styles ranging from swing to avant-garde.  In addition to the above, we will hear him with Miles Davis, Gerry Mulligan, Judy Niemack, Warne Marsh & Bill Evans, Jeanfrancois Prins, Brad Mehldau & Charlie Haden and Art Pepper.  His composition “S

When I googled the word "opera," Wikipedia says, "Opera is a key part of Western Classical Music tradition. It started in Italy at the end of the 16th century and soon spread through the rest of Europe." The article goes on to discuss the history of opera up to the present time, but our own Timothy O'Leary, General Director of Opera Theatre of Saint Louis and Chairman of Opera America, has words to describe opera best.

Copwatch documentary
(photo provided)

The St. Louis International Film Festival is underway through November 12 in venues throughout the city.

“Lots of international films, American independent documentaries and many shorts,” said Cliff Froehlich, executive director of Cinema St. Louis.

Garrison Keillor
(photo provided)

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with long-time host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” Garrison Keillor. 

A best-selling author, he’s received Grammy, ACE and Peabody awards, as well as the National Humanities Medal and election to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Using his unique blend of wit, wisdom and humor, Keillor will share stories on Saturday, Nov. 4 at the Fox Theatre about growing up in the Midwest, the people of Lake Wobegon, and late-life fatherhood.

 

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