Arts & Culture

Visual artist and musician Stan Chisholm
Durrie Bouscaren / St. Louis Public Radio

Having a conversation with Stan Chisholm is like looking through a kaleidoscope.

He seems somber and provocative. Then suddenly there’s a turn; oh wait, there’s a glimmer of humor. Another turn, and he’s somewhere in between.

The Land Sister's project documented salary men in parks, restaurants, and in portraiture
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

This past May, St. Louis-based photographers Sarah-Marie and Andrea Land boarded a plane headed for Tokyo, Japan.

The sisters were looking to investigate the Japanese economic phenomena known as
the “salary man,” a white-collar worker characterized by excessive work hours, little sleep, related health problems, and a high rate of suicide.

One set of drawings up for sale at 10th Street Gallery
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Downtown Police Bike Unit is hoping to serve the community creatively while addressing gun violence. To this end, officers organized a show of artwork they produced. Funds raised from the sale of this work will be donated to Jamyla Bolden’s fourth grade class in the Riverview Gardens School District.

Officer Solomon Thurman, III serves in the bike unit and his parents run the gallery. He hopes the show lets the class know one thing.

  “They’re not alone and she’s looking over them and her spirit inspired us as far as to help them,” said Thurman, III.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, October 11, 2015 is “The Music of Kenny Dorham.”  During his active playing career, flashier contemporaries, such as Freddie Hubbard and Lee Morgan sadly eclipsed trumpeter Kenny Dorham in the public eye.  This was because of his softer sound, narrower range and a more melodic playing style.  Many of his compositions had a distinct Latin feel.  He was born in Fairfield, Texas in 1924 and played piano from the age of seven and began playing trumpet in high school.  In addition, Dorham was a boxer in his early life.  Dorham went to New York in 1945 after the service

This National League Central Division series will be historic: The Cards and Cubs are facing one another for the first time ever in the postseason, and the best-of-five series opens Friday at Busch Stadium.

As rivalries go, this one is tops. But our money’s on Cardinals fans because when it comes to the proper waving of rally towels they’ve had lots of experience.

(Courtesy: St. Louis Symphony)

The Missouri Arts Council is giving away $4.2 million in grants in the coming year. The funding is slightly less than last year’s allotment. According to the council’s executive director Michael Donovan, the lower amount is the result of static funding from state government.

“We were also spending money down that was in a cultural trust, and this is at the request of the legislature. So this year, since that money’s been spent down over the years, we didn’t have as much this year to spend down as we did the previous year,” said Donovan.

Maxine Linehan

This interview will be on "Cityscape” at noon Friday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Irish singer Maxine Linehan packed her bags over ten years ago and left fair Éire, starting a new life in America. She sings of the journey, one she thinks you or your ancestors may know all too well.

Peter Martin

This interview will be on "Cityscape” at noon Friday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Local piano legend Peter Martin released his newest album, “What Lies Ahead” just last week. Including a mix of original tunes and jazz standards, the CD was recorded at Shock City Studios located in south St. Louis. The album features other local greats such as Erin Bode, Brian Owens and several members of the 442s.

File Photo | St. Louis Cardinals

Every year for the past five, Cardinals fans have headed into October knowing all is right in the world: Post-season play is about to commence.

And yet each year, there seems to be a little more pushback against the Cardinals. As Will Leitch noted in 2013, “Over the last eight years, the Cardinals have ended the postseason dreams of the Mets, Tigers, Phillies, Brewers, Rangers, Nationals and Pirates. That's a lot of fan bases spitting in your general direction.”

Last year, we added the Dodgers.

Tournament hall from the 2014 Millionaire Chess tournament.
Millionaire Chess 2014

Part of any good chess player's repertoire includes gambits, sacrifices and risks. Specific player's style of play makes them take this path more often than others; this includes those who prefer a high risk/high reward situation rather than consistency.

Kelly Lee and her mother Barbara Hill examine a sculpture inspired by the artist's homeless sister inside the garage studio of JE Baker
Nancy Fowler / St. Louis Public Radio

Barbara Hill of Fenton will do almost anything to support her four daughters. A decade ago while visiting one daughter in the African Republic of Mali, Hill shut her eyes as her car's driver backed down a narrow mountain road to let another vehicle pass.

So simply riding a forward-moving bus to four St. Louis artists’ studios this past Sunday was a breeze. And an eye-opener, as it turned out.

Organizer Leon Braxton at the site of the Transgender Memorial Park.
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

A sliver of land in St. Louis’ Grove neighborhood is getting a makeover to become what may the country’s first Transgender Memorial Park.

It’s a cooperative effort between the city and community members. Leon Braxton got the idea when he heard about the city’s “Plant4Peace” project, a program that gives out free trees for local gathering spaces.

“I thought about this would be a great opportunity for something in the LGBT community,” Braxton said. director Chris Paavola, (left), speaks with a resident during a results party Saturday at the Heman Park Community Center. Paavola and other University Center organizers launched a campaign to link residents with causes they care about.
Kameel Stanley | St. Louis Public Radio

Organizers of had a simple goal in mind when they launched their interactive social campaign this summer:

Find out what residents in University City want and need from their community. It didn’t take long to get the answer.

Over a 30 day period, residents submitted more than 2,000 responses to this prompt: “My #HopeForUCity is…”

The exterior of the new Lewis & Clark branch of the St. Louis County Library.
St. Louis County Library

In 2014, historic preservationists and community members called for the preservation of St. Louis County Library’s Lewis & Clark branch, designed by noted architect Frederick Dunn. Activists said that branch was the most architecturally significant in the county library’s system. Also at stake were stained glass windows, created by artist Robert Harmon with Emil Frei Studios, depicting Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and Sacajawea on their famed Westward expedition.

Chuck Berry
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

This month marks one year since Chuck Berry wrapped up his iconic run at Blueberry Hill in the Delmar Loop. The musician’s performing status is up in the air, according to Blueberry Hill owner Joe Edwards.

“The fact he’s almost 89 years old, who knows? He has the interest in doing it but he’s also working on some songs,” said Edwards. 

John Thavis covered the Vatican for 30 years.
Provided by the author

When veteran Vatican journalist John Thavis interviewed exorcists for his new book, many said right off that exorcism was “nothing at all like the movie.”

These American and Italian priests were referring to the 1973 movie “The Exorcist” made from William Peter Blatty’s novel, which was based on a St. Louis event.

Parking lots disappear in renderings of the new east entrance of Washington University.
Renderings from Washington University

Two of the most important civic, cultural, educational and recreational institutions in the region — Washington University and Forest Park — announced building and renovation plans over the weekend, plans that include transformative changes to come as well as some work already completed.

The plans also include a campaign for bulking up endowment funds for the future for Forest Park. Together, the plans represent a total of about $370 million and include five buildings and a green on the eastern part of the university campus.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for October 4 is  “The Career of Jeff Hamilton.”  Born in Richmond, Indiana, drummer Jeff Hamilton is comfortable playing in all styles of music, equally at home in trio, combo or big band settings.  He went to Indiana University and started his career with Lionel Hampton in 1974.  Jeff first came to prominence with Monty Alexander trio in 1976.  Since then, he has played with a wide variety of artists, including Woody Herman, Oscar Peterson, Ray Brown and the LA Four.  His drumming is very melodic and is characterized by the use of an older style Chinese cymbal.  He teaches,

Commentary: The art form of dance thrives in St. Louis

Oct 2, 2015

The art form of dance is thriving in its many guises throughout our city.

Dance St. Louis, led by Michael Uthoff, presents the best dance companies from around the world at both The Touhill and The Fox.

During Uthoff's ten year tenure, the organization not only focuses on the art form, but has through time, energy, and money been committed to preparing St. Louis's youth interested in dance with comprehensive educational programs.

Director of Sheldon Art Galleries Olivia Lahs-Gonzales joined artist Larry Krone to discuss Krone's exhibit at the Sheldon, "The Best, Best Everything."
Aine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Nationally-known multimedia artist Larry Krone grew up in St. Louis, but has not returned for a major exhibition of his work since 2006. On Friday, Oct. 2, that changes when the Sheldon Art Galleries opens an exhibition of his pieces, which combine found textiles, graphics and craft materials with his own artistic stamp.