Arts & Culture

Liberty Bell of the West on Kaskaskia Island
Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon | file photo

Several floods have scarred the Kaskaskia Island, the most recent being the Great Flood of 1993. After that, Illinois prohibited residents from moving back unless more than 51 percent of their home remained standing. And current building codes virtually prohibit new construction.

Kaskaskia Island was created by flooding. Originally not an island at all and on the east bank of the Mississippi River, the town was settled by French fur traders in 1686 just south of Ste. Genevieve. It was an administrative center for the area and became the first capital of Illinois.

I LOVE great ideas. Solutions. Effective approaches.

If I were asked to nominate "the best idea wasted," it would be the IBOT wheelchair invented by Dean Kamen using his Segway technology.

Segway, you'll recall, is that two-wheeled device that takes a standing rider and never tips over due to the gyroscope technology created by Kamen's company DEKA. It's a remarkable invention.

For four years -- more than twice as long as an elephant's gestation period -- Karen Brody labored over her play about the ultimate conclusion of pregnancy. Then, "Birth" was born.

 

Walter Metcalfe
St. Louis Public Radio file photo

This time last year revitalizing the Arch grounds seemed to be the impossible dream. An idea put forth by the Danforth Foundation to create a museum above ground on the Arch grounds was nixed by the National Park Service, and with that decision an enormous amount of money and the prestige of the Foundation took a hike.

The impossible dreaming did not take into account the determination of St. Louis lawyer Walter Metcalfe Jr.

While on vacation, I read an interesting New York Times story about five neuroscientists who took a wilderness trip. They wanted to see how immersion in nature might affect their digitally overloaded brains.

For "Screwed Again," a reprise of sorts of 2008's "Screwed In" at the Gallery of the Regional Arts Commission, nine local artists spent days painting a mural that occupies three walls of the enormous main gallery.

Last week, the location wars got serious. The same day that Foursquare was featured in the New York Times Fashion & Style section, Facebook launched its Places application.

Author Sara Paretsky will be in town for a book signing at the St. Louis County Public Library on Aug. 31, the day "Body Work," her 14th novel featuring the exploits of private eye V.I. Warshawski, officially reaches the nation's bookstores.

Preparing for its major fall season opener, the Rivane Neuenschwander survey, the Kemper Art Museum is playing out the summer with “Gesture, Scrape, Combine, Calculate: Postwar Abstraction from the Permanent Collection.” 

But this show is anything but a placeholder in the exhibition schedule. It’s a solid survey of mid-century modern painting and sculpture that reveals some surprises and reminds us of the excellent quality of the Kemper’s collection.

Dan Parris, at the white cliffs of Dover, England
Provided by the film company

Dan Parris

Dan Parris has made it his calling to try to get by in life on not much more than pennies. With two compatriots, the 26-year-old St. Louisan has hitchhiked halfway across America on $1.25 a day. He is nearing completion of a documentary film intended to motivate others, particularly his generation, to do something about extreme poverty.

In trying to spread his message, Dan Parris nearly died in a plane crash in Nairobi, Kenya, last summer.

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