Arts & Culture

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Ten years from now, you will hopefully see Fort Zumwalt West High School senior Audri Bartholomew accepting the crowning award in the much-lauded EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony, for those in the know). You’ll also hopefully see Belleville East High School sophomore Abby Zaiz still tap dancing to her heart’s content.

One artist's piece examines the history of suicide at the Golden Gate Bridge. The art includes netting, a map of San Francisco, suicide prevention phones, and a note explaining the piece.
Provided by Zoe Becker

Advocacy organization Metro Trans Umbrella Group's third annual art exhibit is open this month. The show focuses on lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans artists.

The show's curator Capella Marissa Huniwalt said the exhibit can bring unknown artists to a wider audience.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, April 24, will be “The Keys and Strings Hour + New Music.” The Keys and Strings hour will feature pianist Keith Jarrett, one of the most amazing improvisers in jazz, in solo, duo and trio performances.  New music for April will include the debut live recording of the Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, the SF Jazz Collective performing the music of Michael Jackson, vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant, the Steve Kuhn Trio, the East-West Trumpet Summit, newly discovered live piano duets between Tommy Flanagan and Hank Jones, Ernie Wilkins’ Almost big Band, the Marc

Bulldozers and dump trucks are what's in store for the vacant mall most recently known as Crestwood Court as redevelopment plans are in the works. Thousands of residents came to say good-bye at a food truck festival held Saturday.
Stephanie Lecci | St. Louis Public Radio

Santa Claus. That’s the first thing Carol Feldman thinks of when she recalls her childhood memories of the mall known then as Crestwood Plaza off Watson Road.

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

When Robert Charles Howard retires as conductor of the Belleville Philharmonic Orchestra in a few weeks, he hopes a certain musical instrument will follow in his footsteps: an aging 32-inch timpani that has lost much of its luster.

“I’ll miss the job, but I won’t miss this,” Howard said with a smile, as he rolled the dented kettle drum back into its place in the instrument storage room at the orchestra’s rehearsal hall in downtown Belleville.

When I think of still life paintings, I think of Dutch 16th century works which have a beautiful display of flowers presented very formally in a lovely vase.

A walk into the Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert called The Galen makes us all realize that still life works included in an exhibition entitled "Still Life: Capturing the Moment" cover the gamut. In this small gem of a show are works in virtually all media.

"Woodhenge" by Indian contemporary artist Gigi Scaria relates to the reconstruction of the ancient woodhenge site at Cahokia in the Metro East. Scaria's work will be featured for Obscura Day at Laumeier Sculpture Park.
Atlas Obscura |Laumeier Sculpture Park, Gigi Scaria

Two St. Louis area sites are among hundreds of locations around the globe being featured in an exotic festival of places of interest this Saturday.

The local Songs of Africa ensemble is one of many groups performing in "A Tribute to African Composers."
African Musical Arts | Provided

A weekend concert in St. Louis pays homage to composers whose names are often left off lists that include Mozart, Bach and Britten.

“A Tribute to African Composers: Music Bringing People Together” features names like Adolphus Hailstork, Uzee Brown  and Tania Leon,  among a host of others with African roots.

John Lucas and Claudia Rankine whiteness, inc., 2016 Video projection Duration: 5:10 minutes
Provided by Pulitzer Arts Foundation

This weekend The Pulitzer Arts Foundation will display its first commissioned video poem for an exhibition. The video, titled "whiteness, inc.," critiques media presentations of whiteness as more beautiful than other skin colors.

Charles Bogel | Wikimedia Commons

CBS journalist Lesley Stahl, most widely known for her work on 60 Minutes, has interviewed heads of state, covered Watergate and broken scores of political news stories throughout her journalism career. Now, Stahl is facing a new challenge: “Becoming Grandma.”

Stahl has written a new book about “The Joys and Science of New Grandparenting,” and joined host Don Marsh to discuss her experience learning to become a grandmother.

Melissa Gerth and Arnela Bogdanic in rehearsal at Grbic Banquet Hall, where "Bosnian/American: The Dance for Life" plays April 15-16 before moving to Fontbonne University.
Traci Clapper

The generation gap is said to be narrowing as more millennials move back in with, and seek advice from, their parents. But in St. Louis, the chasm may be growing for one group of young adults.

Two decades ago, Bosnian genocide survivors arrived in St. Louis penniless and ravaged by war. In one generation, they’ve built businesses, bought homes and raised children who are succeeding at high school and college — and assimilation. A new Mustard Seed play, “Bosnian/American: The Dance for Life,” explores the lives of these young adults, weaving their story around a traditional Bosnian tale about a young sheep and a menacing wolf.

On Chess: The American Chess family reunites in St. Louis

Apr 14, 2016
Fabiano Caruana and Hikaru Nakamura
Provided by the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

April 13, 2016, will be remembered as the opening day of the strongest U.S. Championship and U.S. Women’s Championship in history. The excitement surrounding the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis is palpable. Players, coaches, commentators, journalists and fans from all over the world are eagerly waiting to feast on the chess spectacle that this event is going to bring to the table. The mixture of styles, age and experience that this year’s fields created are quite the delight for anybody interested in the royal game.

The 2006 World's Series was a winner for the Cardinals.
Matt Dimmic | Flickr

The Cardinals’ home opener has come and gone and, with it, redbird fury is swirling upward. On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, in honor of baseball season, we had a special treat for listeners: A discussion about a new book titled “Immortal Moments in Cardinals History.”

Ron Jacober, famed local sports broadcaster and Bob Tiemann, baseball historian, co-wrote the book and joined host Don Marsh to discuss what some of those “immortal moments” are.

Listen to the segment here to hear their favorite moments:

JMSchneid | Wikipedia CC license

George Clinton is likely playing this year’s Fair St. Louis.

Wednesday afternoon a Reddit thread appeared stating that one Fair St. Louis headliner would be George Clinton. Clicking through a shared link to George Clinton’s tour schedule revealed that Clinton was indeed listed as playing the July 4th Concert. 

A call to a person listed for Fair St. Louis media inquiries said she could not confirm the artist’s appearance.

Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

The question came into Curious Louis from Joellen Pickens: “Why is West Florissant the eastern-most of the other Florissants?”

Pickens is not the first person to wonder about the multitude of Florissants. The St. Louis Star-Tribune tackled it in 1950.

Howard Barry poses for a portrait at his home studio.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis painter Howard Barry is among the many creative people making work around the events of Ferguson.

But Barry’s story has an unusual twist. It starts with his own tragedy, 24 years ago.

The Trombones of the St. Louis Symphony

The Trombones of the Saint Louis Symphony may be known for their spectacular performances of works by composers like Rimsky-Korsakov, Dukas or Mozart but that’s not all this quartet has up its sleeves. The ensemble will soon feature two world premieres and a new arrangement of Radiohead’ “Everything in its Right Place.”

Yes, you read that right, Radiohead.

A concerned Curious Louis community member, Dee, asked a great question about accountability:

 

Does Curious Louis need to get more sponsors so you can afford the resources needed to answer more of these questions?

Dee continues, "I really enjoy Curious Louis, but they seem to be struggling to keep up with the inquiries."

More resources? Who wouldn't turn down more resources? While more sustaining members to support our work is wonderful (donate here), sometimes our newsroom is just short on time.

 

 

Here's what we can do to keep you informed about the Curious Louis reporting process and what you can do to help it work better.

Fans and camera crews surround the band Madisen Ward and the Mama Bear's performance
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s 9:30 on Saturday morning and there’s a garage rock band playing in a flower shop and plant nursery on Cherokee Street. Half an hour later another group performs in front of a group of kids in a chemical safety office.  By mid-afternoon bands have played in bike shops, feminist sex stores, micro-breweries and clothing stores along Cherokee Street. It’s all part of Lo-Fi Cherokee. 

“It’s like a marathon of shooting music videos,” said Lo-Fi attendee Adam Ballard.

Image of the author Brian Blanchfield
Provided by Brian Blanchfield

Award-winning poet and essayist Brian Blanchfield gave himself a strange set of requirements for his new book "Proxies: Essays Near Knowing" – write essays purely from memory. Do not check book titles or apartment locations. Stay away from Google.  Fact check nothing – at least until the end.

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