Benny Goodman

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday, May 15, 2016 will be “The Music of Mary Lou Williams.”  Piano prodigy Mary Lou Williams taught herself piano at the age of six and was playing professionally by age seven.  Discovered in Kansas City in 1929, she wrote hundreds of compositions and arrangements for many bands as well as playing powerful jazz piano.  In the early 1950’s, she became a devout Catholic and wrote three masses (two unrecorded).  Her “Mass for Peace,” also known as “Mary Lou’s Mass,” was commissioned by the Pontifical Commission on Peace and Justice in March of 1969.  We will hear

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for February 7 will be the first of a five-part series on “Jazz Families: Blood Relatives.”  There are an amazing number of jazz musicians who have blood relatives (mothers, fathers, siblings) who are also jazz musicians.  This show will feature music by the Dodds brothers, the Buckner brothers, the DeParis brothers, the Goodman brothers, Albert Ammons and his son Gene, Cannonball and Nat Adderley and Nat’s son Nat Adderley, Jr., the Clayton family, the Candoli brothers, the Brecker brothers, the Cole brothers, the Barron brothers, the Bryant brothers, Kenny Drew and

Dennis C.. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C.. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for February 8 will be  “Jazz Musicians With Long Performance Careers-Part 2.”  While many jazz fans think that jazz musicians die young, data shows that this is not the case.  The month of February will be devoted to the music of over 200 major jazz artists who have performing careers of fifty years and longer.  Some of the 78 musicians heard in various combinations on tonight’s show are Ernestine Anderson, Benny Goodman, Mary Lou Williams, Abdullah Ibrahim, Louis Armstrong, Earl Hines, Quincy Jones, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Woody Herman, Ella Fitzgerald.

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited Sunday, November 10  will be “Live Jazz From Carnegie Hall-Part 1.”  While Carnegie Hall opened in 1881, jazz was not heard there until 1938, when Benny Goodman had the first jazz concert.  Since then many jazz concerts have been held there and some were recorded.  In the years since 1938, Carnegie Hall has hosted three of John Hammond’s “Spiritual to Swing” concerts with Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Charlie Christian, Big Joe Turner and Lester Young; Jazz at the Philharmonic concerts with Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Charlie Parker, Lester Young, Flip Phillips and Oscar P

Dennis C. Ows;ey / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

Jazz Unlimited for Sunday evening, August 11 will be “The Great Jazz Soloists-Part 2.” A great jazz solo is awe-inspiring, exciting, emotional and always tells a story.  In the entire history of jazz, there are only a few soloists who are consistently capable of a great solo in every performance.  Jazz Unlimited will play these musicians over the next few weeks.  The artists for August 11 will be Joe “King” Oliver, Fats Waller, Bix Beiderbecke, Django Reinhardt, Coleman Hawkins, Benny Goodman, Gene Krupa, Johnny Hodges, Stuff Smith, Pee Wee Russell, Serge Chaloff, Paul Desmond, Jim Hall, Ra

Dennis C. Owsley / Copyright Dennis C. Owsley

On the Sunday, February 10 Jazz Unlimited, we continue our series on urban centers that have brought great musicians to jazz by having teachers and institutions that bring them into the music at an early age.  The Jazz Cities series will feature the second part on musicians born in or nurtured early in their careers in Chicago.  Some of the musicians and groups featured will be blues pianist Jimmy Yancey, pianist Joe Sullivan, cornetist Muggsy Spanier, the Benny Goodman quartet with Lionel Hampton and Gene Krupa, vocalists Kurt Elling, Johnny Hartman, Abbey Lincoln and Patricia Barber, The