Bill DeWitt

Busch Stadium in Downtown St. Louis.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

The chairman of the St. Louis Cardinals expressed disbelief and embarrassment about a hacking scandal that has invited scrutiny onto the baseball club.

But while the Cardinals’ managing partner says the controversy will dent his team’s image in the short term, he doesn’t believe that the actions of “roguish” individuals would permanently scar the club.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Supporters of the long-delayed Ballpark Village project in downtown St. Louis made a renewed pitch today for state backing to the Missouri Development Finance Board.

The $100 million project would be built on the north side of Busch Stadium and would contain space for retail stores, restaurants, an open-air event space with a retractable roof, and a St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame and Museum.  Team President Bill DeWitt III says the project got sidetracked by the economic crisis that hit the country four years ago.

(via Official Cardinals Twitter account)

The Cardinals are one step closer to making Ballpark Village a reality. A St. Louis Board of Aldermen committee voted Wednesday to move forward with revised development and financing plans.

Cardinals president Bill DeWitt III made his case for the city’s support before the Housing, Urban Development and Zoning Committee.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The city's Downtown Economic Stimulus Authority has restarted the clock on the construction of Ballpark Village.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Remember Ballpark Village? The multi-million dollar development at the site of the old Busch Stadium that was supposed to rival Kansas City's Power and Light District? (And is in fact a product of the same developer, Cordish Companies.) The development that in 2008 became not-so-affectionately known as Lake DeWitt? That was supposed to be partially completed by the All Star Game and instead got turned into a parking lot and softball field?

Well, kind of like a cat, the project lives again. And this time, Ald. Phyllis Young says she thinks something substantial will get built.