Brad Lager

Sen. Brad Lager
Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Northwest Missouri will have a new state senator next year, as Brad Lager prepares to leave office.

The Republican from Savannah can't run again because of term limits, but he says he's ready for the next chapter in his life -- which for now does not include politics. 

Lager sat down recently with St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin to talk about his time in office and about what he considers to be roadblocks toward making Missouri better. The interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate had seven new members after the smoke cleared from the 2006 election cycle. Only two served for the maximum time allowed under term limits – Senate Minority Leader Jolie Justus, D-Kansas City, and state Sen. Brad Lager, R-Savannah.

The two lawmakers are at the opposite ends of the political spectrum. Justus entered the General Assembly as a combative fighter who fought tooth-and-nail against the Republican majority. Lager, who was arguably more conservative than his Republican counterparts, seemed on a course for higher office.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Governor Jay Nixon's (D) proposal to land production of Boeing's 777X passenger jet is two steps closer to success, as the Missouri Senate gave it both first-round and final approval Wednesday.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri senators have given up their attempt to pass an overhaul of some of the state's tax credit programs for businesses and developers.

Supporters of the bill set it aside Friday after Republican Sen. Brad Lager, of Savannah, spoke against it for an hour in a filibuster that could have otherwise continued until the session's mandatory end at 6 p.m.

The legislation would have created tax incentives for international air cargo exports, computer data centers and investors in startup technology companies.

(File photos/official photos/Facebook)

Among the races for Missouri’s statewide offices, the one with the most mudslinging so far is the Republican primary for Lt. Governor.  Peter Kinder is seeking re-election, but he’s facing a major challenge from State Senator Brad Lager.  Both are touting conservative ideals while attacking each other’s records in office. 

St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at next week’s GOP Lt. Governor’s contest.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has vetoed two workplace-related bills passed by Missouri lawmakers this year.  They are the first vetoes issued this year.

First, he vetoed the House version of the workplace discrimination bill, which would have redefined discrimination as a “motivating factor” instead of a “contributing factor” in any action taken by an employer against a worker.  The Senate version of the bill is still alive, however.  It was sponsored by State Senator Brad Lager (R, Savannah).

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri Senate has sent the House version of the workplace discrimination bill to Governor Jay Nixon.

Senate Democrats spent five hours Wednesday blocking the bill before sitting down.  Today, there was no debate, only a 23 to 8 straight party-line vote.  Brad Lager (R, Savannah) handled the bill in the Senate.  He says he fully expects the governor, a Democrat, to veto the bill.

(via flickr/jimbowen0306)

A new measure passed in the Missouri Senate would limit statewide officials to eight years in office.

Missouri currently limits the governor and treasurer to two four year terms each. Members of the state House and Senate are also subject to term limits.

A proposed constitutional amendment would extend the two-term limits to the lieutenant governor, secretary of state, attorney general and auditor.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri Senate has passed legislation that would redefine what constitutes discrimination in the workplace.

The vote was a mere formality following last week’s battle to kill the measure.  Maria Chappelle-Nadal of University City and several other Senate Democrats had conducted a filibuster, but gave in after language guaranteeing jury trials in discrimination lawsuits was added to the bill.  But she still spoke out against it, in particular, the Missouri Chamber’s claim that the bill would help curb frivolous lawsuits.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to legislation that would redefine workplace discrimination, after an agreement was reached between the bill’s sponsor and a group of Democrats that had been blocking it.

The agreement took the form of an amendment to the bill, which would guarantee the right to a jury trial in any workplace discrimination case.  State Senator Brad Lager (R, Savannah), the bill’s sponsor, agreed to support the amendment.

A group of Democratic State Senators is blocking a bill that would redefine Missouri’s workplace discrimination standards.

Among those taking part in the filibuster are Robin Wright-Jones (D, St. Louis) and Maria Chappelle-Nadal (D, University City).  They talked about several other topics besides the discrimination bill on the Senate floor Wednesday, including America’s immigration policies.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

All statewide officeholders in Missouri would be limited to eight years in office, under legislation pre-filed in the State Senate.

The Governor and State Treasurer are the only statewide office holders in Missouri limited to two four-year terms.  The rest – Lt. GovernorAttorney GeneralSecretary of State and State Auditor – can run for re-election as often as they want.  The measure is sponsored by State Senator Brad Lager (R, Savannah), who is also running for Lt. Governor.

(via Mo. State Senate website)

Northwest Missouri state Senator Brad Lager has moved quickly to take advantage of an opening in the lieutenant governor's race.

The Savannah Republican announced his candidacy for the state's No. 2 executive on Monday, just days after Republican House Speaker Steven Tilley announced he was dropping out of the lieutenant governor's race.