breast cancer

Breast Cancer Research
6:55 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Record Low Turnout At Susan G. Komen Race For The Cure

More than 30,000 people participated in this years Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Race turnout has been on the decline over the past few years.
Credit Parth Shah

(Updated 11:40 a.m., Thurs., June 19

More than 30,000 people gathered for the 16th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Saturday morning, turning downtown St. Louis into a sea of pink balloons and tutus.

Over the past 16 years, Susan G. Komen St. Louis has raised $29 million for breast cancer research and treatment. But attendance at the annual race has been on the decline. There were 10,000 fewer participants at this year’s race compared to 2013.

Read more
Cancer Treatment
10:43 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Scientists Confirm 'Chemobrain' Is Real, Patients Find Validation

Dr. Bradley Schlaggar and his colleagues at the Washington University School of Medicine used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize "chemobrain," a phenomenon that many patients receiving chemotherapy describe as a "mental fog."
Credit Bradley Schlaggar

  

Most people have heard about the undesirable side effects that chemotherapy has on the body of people suffering from cancer. There's balding, fatigue and loss of appetite, to name a few.

Until recently, however, chemotherapy’s effects on the brain weren’t widely recognized. The cognitive side effects – a  fuzzy memory and poor attention span – were usually dismissed by physicians, scientists and even some cancer patients.

The symptoms have a name: Post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment, or “chemobrain,” among those who suffer from it.

Read more
cancer victims
11:53 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Husband, Wife Find Strength From One Another As They Cope With Cancer

Cliff Fields (left), Sherrill Jackson and Sha Fields at a recent Breakfast Club event for cancer survivors
Credit Robert Joiner

The day Sha Fields was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007, her fiancé came along to offer moral support, and he has been by her side since then. She says she used to wonder how to repay his years of unconditional support. The chance came last year, when the husband, Cliff, was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The Siteman Center for Advanced Medicine at Washington University had no data on how unusual it is for a husband and wife to have cancer, but Sha says she is hearing that the experience is becoming more common.

Read more
Breast Cancer
3:24 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

For Young Women, Drinking Alcohol Increases The Risk Of Breast Cancer

Young women who average a drink per day have a 13 percent higher risk of developing breast cancer than non-drinkers, according to researchers at Wash U.
Washington University

Updated on August 29 to change 13% to 11% after further clarification from study co-author Graham Colditz.

A new study out of Washington University suggests that young women who drink regularly are at increased risk for developing breast cancer.

Read more
Science
2:25 am
Mon August 5, 2013

When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see."
Richard Knox NPR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:39 am

When Sally O'Neill's doctor told her she had an early form of cancer in one of her breasts, she didn't agonize about what she wanted to.

The 42-year-old mother of two young girls wanted a double mastectomy.

"I decided at that moment that I wanted them both taken off," says O'Neill, who lives in a suburb of Boston. "There wasn't a real lot of thought process to it. I always thought, 'If this happens to me, this is what I'm going to do.' Because I'm not taking any chances. I want the best possible outcome. I don't want to do a wait-and-see."

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
1:57 pm
Tue May 21, 2013

Genetics Counseling For Cancer And The Decision To Have Preventive Surgery

DNA Double Helix
(Courtesy: National Human Genome Research Institute)

Cancer is cruel and it impacts the lives of far too many people and their families.  According to the World Health Organization, breast cancer kills 458,000 people each year.

Recently, actress and director Angelina Jolie, in a New York Times op-ed entitled My Medical Choice, announced she received a double mastectomy in order to minimize her risk of getting breast cancer.

Jolie has a genetic predisposition to breast cancer.  Her mom died from the disease at the age of 56.

Read more
Breast Cancer
2:31 pm
Fri December 7, 2012

Wash U. Research Findings Could Be Good News To Some Breast Cancer Patients

The top image shows untreated breast cancer cells with HER2 mutations. The bottom image shows how much these cells shrink after treatment with neratinib, an anti-HER2 drug currently in clinical trials.
(via Washington University in St. Louis/Shyam Kavuri, Ph. D.)

The findings of new breast cancer research from Washington University could result in effective treatment for 4,000 additional patients in the United States each year. Scientists made the discovery after analyzing DNA sequencing data from 1,500 patients.

The research appears in the latest edition of Cancer Discovery.

So what does this research mean?

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
3:51 pm
Mon October 8, 2012

In Depth: British Adventurer Completes 1,000 Mile Swim In St. Louis

Dave Cornthwaite Complete Swim in St. Louis
Dave Cornthwaite / Expedition1000

Dave Cornthwaite is a remarkable British adventurer and he just completed a 1,000 mile swim down the Missouri River, ending in St.

Read more
1,000 mile swim
4:38 pm
Sat October 6, 2012

British Swimmer Completes 1,000 Mile Swim Down Missouri, Mississippi River

Dave Cornthwaite Expedition1000

Update: Dave was interviewed by Don Marsh on St. Louis on the Air on Monday. You can listen to that conversation by clicking here.

--

This morning The Gateway Arch was the last stop on British swimmer Dave Cornthwaite’s 1000-mile journey down the Missouri River, completing the last few miles on the Mississippi River. 

Read more
Science
7:04 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

New research could lead to better treatment for some types of breast cancer

The new study finds that basal-like breast cancer cells (above) are genetically more like ovarian cancer than other types of breast cancer.
Matthew Ellis Washington University

Researchers at Washington University used new technology to unravel the entire genetic helix for a subset of breast cancer, called basal-like, and found that it is more like ovarian cancer than other types of breast cancer.

The study’s co-Leader, Mathew Ellis, said that means techniques used to tackle ovarian cancer could be more effective than traditional methods for basal-like breast cancer.

“The more we understand about an individual breast cancer the more we can actually treat the patient accurately,” Ellis said.  “I like to call this genome forward medicine.”

Read more

Pages