Bridgeton Landfill

 

Missouri Attorney General's Office

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster said Monday that this weekend’s surface fire at the Bridgeton Landfill will play a role in the state’s ongoing lawsuit against its owner, Republic Services.

The fire “informs the court case,’’ Koster said. “The fact that a fire did flare up gives credence to the overall concerns that residents have had for some time.”

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A study conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has concluded that the underground fire plaguing part of the Bridgeton Landfill site isn’t a hazardous threat, even if it reaches radioactive material stored at a neighboring landfill.

Bridgeton Landfill
Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

The company that owns a smoldering landfill in Bridgeton has agreed to perform additional testing for carbon monoxide at the site.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio & The Beacon

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster wants more air monitoring at the Bridgeton Landfill, where an underground fire has been smoldering for more than three years.

Attorney General Koster asked the St. Louis County Circuit Court on Thursday to order the landfill's owner to collect more data on carbon monoxide emissions.

Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 1:25 p.m. to add statement from Republic Services, and at 6:00 p.m. to add comments from EPA.

More radioactive material has been found at the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton.

The material was detected during radioactivity testing in preparation for the construction of a trench. That trench will separate radioactive waste at the West Lake Landfill from an underground fire smoldering at the adjacent Bridgeton Landfill.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is overseeing the construction of the firebreak trench.

(Sarah Skiold-Hanlin, St. Louis Public Radio)

A nuclear policy analyst is adding his voice to those of area residents, environmental advocates and local government officials who want radioactive wastes out of the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton.

Robert Alvarez served as a senior policy advisor in the Department of Energy under the Clinton administration and is currently a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies.

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated 4:07 p.m.

Preliminary work to build a firebreak at the Bridgeton Landfill will begin next week. But a local environmental group is worried about what it could stir up.

To figure out where they can safely dig the trench that will separate the underground fire from the radioactive waste, contractors will test the soil for radioactivity. That involves clearing trees and shrubs away from where the firebreak will be built.

Missouri Department of Natural Resources

This isn't the first time a fire has smoldered underground at the landfill in Bridgeton.

The Missouri Coalition for the Environment says another subsurface fire burned there in 1993.

They found a reference to that fire in an old report related to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's management of radioactive waste at the landfill.

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Attorney General Chris Koster has asked the federal Environmental Protection Agency to conduct radioactivity tests at the West Lake landfill in Bridgeton that were delayed because of the government shutdown.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The controversy over the still-smoldering Bridgeton Landfill and its proximity to nuclear waste is apparently spreading, with a public meeting set up for Thursday in University City.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5:40 p.m. to add Missouri Coalition for the Environment letter and comment from Republic Services.

The fire within the Bridgeton Landfill is still smoldering and now the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is ordering the company which operates the landfill to install additional temperature monitors to track the fire.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For two and a half hours, federal and state officials were bombarded Tuesday night with the same angry message from hundreds of frustrated people packing the auditorium at Pattonville High School:

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Owners of the Bridgeton landfill – beset by a persistent odor, an underground “hot spot” and a nearby radioactive site – are likely prepared for an earful of complaints and concerns at Tuesday night’s hearing hosted by the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

A suburban St. Louis lawmaker is calling for the removal of nuclear waste from a landfill near Lambert Airport.

Underground smoldering at the Bridgeton Landfill has created a foul odor so strong that Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster sued the landfill owner, Republic Services.

Bridgeton Landfill is part of the larger West Lake Landfill. Another area of West Lake contains nuclear waste from the Cold War era.

Environmental Protection Agency report p. 15

The Environmental Protection Agency says radioactive wastes at the West Lake Landfill in Bridgeton are "contained" and "do not pose public health risks."

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Regional officials with the federal Environmental Protection Agency are holding a public meeting Tues., June 25 to allay fears of Bridgeton area residents about the possible health risks posed by the radioactive waste stored at the West Lake Landfill.

The meeting is to be held at Pattonville High School, from 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Wednesday, May 22, 5:30 p.m.: The Department of Health & Senior Services is also posting its evaluations of the air monitoring data here. The regulatory standards that DHSS is using to estimate the health risks from landfill fumes are here.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster announced a preliminary agreement on Tuesday with the owner of the Bridgeton Landfill.

Koster filed a lawsuit against Republic Services six weeks ago, alleging violations of state environmental laws. A fire has been smoldering underground at the landfill for two and half years.

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

A ruling is expected Tuesday morning related to the Missouri Attorney General's lawsuit against the owners of the Bridgeton Landfill.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 1:02 p.m. May 10 to reflect missing data has now been posted.

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has released more air sampling results for the Bridgeton Landfill.

According to a written summary on the DNR's website, the Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services analyzed the data collected from mid-March through April 23 and found unhealthy levels of sulfur dioxide at two sites near the landfill.

Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio

The company that owns the Bridgeton Landfill is offering to cover the cost of hotel stays for nearby residents who want to get away from the smell.

On Tuesday, Republic Services sent a letter to 270 households within a one-mile radius of the landfill, saying the company would pay for residents to move to a pet-friendly hotel between May 20 and June 14.

Beacon archives | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster announced Wednesday that court dates have been set for May 14 and 15 in St. Louis to “hear evidence’’ in a lawsuit that his office filed in late March against Republic Services, Inc., owner of the odor-generating Bridgeton landfill, under fire from its residential neighbors.

The landfill is also quite literally under fire, as a result of underground burning that continues.

Bridgeton Landfill
Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

The company that owns the Bridgeton Landfill is gearing up for the next phase of an effort to control an underground fire that has been burning at the site for more than two years.

Starting on Monday, Republic Services will begin excavating sections of the landfill to remove underground concrete pipes.

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Things have been heating up at the Bridgeton Landfill, a few miles west of the St. Louis airport.

Whether you call it an underground fire, a smoldering event, or just a chemical reaction, it’s causing temperatures inside the landfill to reach well over 200 degrees.

And as St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra reports, area residents are worried about the potentially noxious fumes — and what could happen if the fire spreads.

The Wilfongs

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For residential neighbors long distressed over the smelly – and firey – Bridgeton landfill, Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster’s announcement that the state has filed suit against the landfill’s operator offered hope that the worst may be over.

But minutes later, Assistant Attorney General Jessica Blome inadvertently dispelled that notion by acknowledging short-term pain may come before any long-term gain.

Veronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 4:30 p.m.

Missouri's Attorney General Chris Koster has filed a lawsuit in response to the ongoing concerns surrounding the Bridgeton Landfill.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For residential neighbors long distressed over the smelly – and firey – Bridgeton landfill, Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster’s announcement that the state has filed suit against the landfill’s operator offered hope that the worst may be over.

But minutes later, Assistant Attorney General Jessica Blome inadvertently dispelled that notion by acknowledging short-term pain may come before any long-term gain.

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated on Friday, March 22 at 9:45 a.m. to add information about air sampling results, and a statement from Republic Services.

The Missouri Department of Resources is asking the state’s attorney general to enforce environmental laws at the Bridgeton Sanitary Landfill.

DNR’s letter asks Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster to "institute appropriate legal action to resolve any past, present or future environmental violations" at the landfill.

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

A coalition of environmental and worker rights organizations held a meeting today to lobby government officials about the risks posed by an underground fire at the Bridgeton landfill.

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

A fire has been smoldering underground at the Bridgeton landfill for more than two years. People living in the area have complained of strong chemical smells, and of symptoms including burning eyes and headaches.

Earlier this month, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources tested the air there for toxic chemicals. The DNR took samples on two separate days at six sites near the landfill, including some in a residential area.

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