Cherokee Street

Three local beer companies -- Schlafly, Four Hands and Civil Life Brewing Company -- provided drinks for Friday's fundraiser. Other local companies, neighborhood associations and ordinary residents also pitched in to help.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When Jason Deem met a tourist from Brooklyn on Thursday, he saw Anne McCullough – Cherokee Street’s liaison – apologize that a high-profile shooting was the man's first impression of the eclectic business district.

The tourist, he said, perhaps offered a farsighted take on the situation.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Business owners and residents of Cherokee Street are holding a rally and fundraiser tonight in the wake of yesterday’s murder-suicide at the Cherokee Street Place Business Incubator.

The Cherokee Street community is rallying behind the families of the murder victims. A fundraiser barbecue is being held tonight.

There are plenty of short-hand adjectives I could use to describe Cherokee Street and its denizens: Hip. Artistic. Creative. Quirky. Young. Gruff.

And add passionate -- at least judging from the reaction to two Beacon stories about development along Cherokee and to an inquiry from the Public Insight Network (PIN).

Jason Deem 300 px only
Provided by Mr. Deem | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When a fire seven years ago ravaged the Empire Sandwich Shop at 2624 Cherokee St., Jason Deem took note of what happened in the aftermath and learned some lessons.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Cherokee Street developed a reputation in recent years as a creative and cultural hotspot, buoyed by a diverse and eclectic mix of businesses.

But while many are optimistic about the business district's future, some feel it needs to be more responsive to residents in surrounding neighborhoods.

Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2013

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Nicole Cortes felt the "pull" of Cherokee Street when she was looking for a home.

Cortes, an immigration attorney with the Migrant and Immigrant Community Action Project, said she was attracted to "the diversity and the eclectic mix of small businesses" in the south St. Louis commercial hub. She was also heartened by the area's affordable property — and demographic diversity.

Erin Williams

At the south end of Cherokee Street, tucked in the woven pattern of a record store, bakery, and the occasional Mexican restaurant sits a venue with a large open window and a stenciled sign that reads “Blank Space 2847 Cherokee.”

Peer through the large windows and you’ll see just that – a few chairs scattered around, a large wall of books and some boxes filled with vinyl.

(via Flickr/pasa47)

The artistic community of St. Louis' Cherokee Street is looking for someone creative to put their own mark on the area. Via the Cherokee Street News, the Cherokee Station Business Association has announced a "Cherokee Street Flag Contest."

Eric Woods is Owner and Founder of The Firecracker Press at 2838 Cherokee Street.  He's a visual artist, not a poet.  But he's been teaming up with poets for most of the nine years he's been open, mostly, he says "out of necessity."

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