climate change

Air Pollution - Climate Change
5:41 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

St. Louis NAACP Says Shifting From Coal To Renewables Would Benefit African Americans

St. Louis NAACP President Adolphus Pruitt spoke at a rally on Wednesday organized by the Sierra Club in support of taking action to prevent climate change. Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed (behind Pruitt) was also among the speakers.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

The local NAACP says air pollution from coal-fired power plants is having a disproportionate impact on the health of African Americans in the St. Louis area.

The civil rights organization joined the Sierra Club, Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed and others on Wednesday to rally in favor of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed limits on carbon dioxide emissions.

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Climate Change — Air Pollution
8:38 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

National Analysis Suggests Cutting Carbon Dioxide Would Improve Air Quality In Missouri

Coal-fired power plants produce pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury.
Credit Syracuse University News Services

Cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants would also reduce other types of air pollution, both here in Missouri and nationally.

That's according to a recent analysis by researchers at Harvard and Syracuse Universities.

Along with carbon dioxide, coal-fired power plants emit other pollutants, like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Those in turn can contribute to forming particle pollution, ozone, and smog.

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Climate Change
8:18 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

New Carbon Dioxide Limits Could Mean Big Changes For Coal-Powered States Like Missouri, Illinois

Coal is transported by train from Wyoming to fuel Ameren Missouri's power plants, like this one in Labadie.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the first-ever rules to cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. The proposal sparked immediate debate over the impact, especially in states such as Missouri that depend heavily on coal.

The new regulations would reduce carbon pollution from the power sector by 30 percent nationwide by 2030, compared to 2005 emissions levels.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:30 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Is Time Running Out To Address The World’s Population Explosion?

Alan Weisman, author of Countdown.
Credit media photo

In “Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth,” author Alan Weisman explored what it would take to bring the world’s population down to a sustainable level. The book is a sequel of sorts to Weisman’s bestselling “The World Without Us.”

The idea of “The World Without Us,” said Weisman, was to see how nature could recover from the effects of climate change without humans around to get in the way. But his hope in writing the book was to inspire the discovery of a way to add humans back into the equation.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:05 am
Tue May 6, 2014

More Illinois Farmers Are Embracing High Tech Ag ― But Is 'Big Data' Too Much Like 'Big Brother?'

A farmer uses Monsanto's FieldScripts program to plant his field.
Credit Via Monsanto

Farmers have been collecting data about their farms for decades.

Now all those data are going high tech. Major agricultural companies like Monsanto, John Deere and DuPont have been developing more ways to mine that than ever before – all in the name of helping farmers make better decisions about when to plant, what to plant and how much.

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Pulitzer Foundation
9:28 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Can Art + Science Solve Climate Change? STL’s Pulitzer Seeks Collaborations

Installation view of the Main Gallery, "Art of Its Own Making,"The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, 2014
Credit The Pulitzer, photographer David Johnson

What is St. Louis doing to combat climate change? And how can art and design move those plans forward?

The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts wants to publicize ongoing efforts and encourage new collaborations in its Marfa Dialogues competition. Winners will receive $2,500 and the opportunity to display their ideas in a public forum, which may take many forms, including exhibitions, readings, concerts and film screenings.

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Health, Science, Environment
12:07 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Encounters With Climate Change: A Discussion With Three St. Louisans

St. Louisan Brian Ettling spends his summers as a seasonal park ranger at Crater Lake in Oregon.
courtesy photo

St. Louisan Larry Lazar used to be a climate change skeptic, but a 2006 trip to see family in Alaska changed his mind.

“One of the things you do in Alaska is tour the glaciers. And when you see the before and after pictures there, and when you talk to the park rangers and read the information about why they’re doing what they’re doing, and they’re doing it around the world, you get hit with reality,” said Lazar. “I realized then that what I’d been reading and my sources of information at that time were just wrong.”

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The Rundown
11:42 pm
Sun March 23, 2014

Health, Science, Environment Rundown: Spring Fling

Spring is springing.
Credit (UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Last week, people all over St. Louis – and all over the Midwest and East Coast, probably – celebrated the official start of spring. They celebrated because the winter has been unusually long and cold and, somehow, darker than usual. And they celebrated with a tinge of worry that the brutal winter could give way to an equally brutal, hot summer.

If that does happen, be prepared for a lot of talk about climate change. 

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St. Louis on the Air
3:48 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Author Discussion: Finding Profit In Climate Change

Scientists collect research on the Arctic ice melt from a melt pond during an expedition documented by St. Louis photojournalist Randall Hyman.
(© Randall Hyman)

In his book “Windfall: The Booming Business of Global Warming,” author and freelance journalist McKenzie Funk moves the conversation on climate change beyond whether or not it is happening to focus on people around the world who are finding ways to profit from it.

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Climate Change
5:00 am
Mon December 9, 2013

St. Louis Photojournalist Goes Under The Ice To Document Arctic Climate Change

German diver and marine biologist, Rupert Krapp, of the Norwegian Polar Institute, pumps his fists in victory after surfacing with plankton samples from under the ice at 82 degrees North, 500 miles from the North Pole.
(© Randall Hyman)

Randall Hyman is a St. Louis-based photojournalist and writer. For more than three decades, he has traveled the globe covering cultural and environmental issues.

Hyman recently spent four months in the Norwegian Arctic on a Fulbright project documenting climate change.

He told St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra that Norwegians are already feeling the effects of global warming.

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