climate change

Climate Change
5:12 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

Time's Up! Comment Period Closes On EPA's Proposal to Limit Power Plant Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Missouri currently gets more than 80 percent of its electricity from coal-fired power plants like Ameren's Labadie power plant, pictured here.
Credit Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

Time has run out for the public to comment on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposal to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.

The issue has been highly contentious.

By late November, the EPA had already received more than 1.6 million comments on its proposed rule. [Update: The final tally on comments? 1,913,566.]

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EPA Carbon Rule
8:00 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

EPA Official Talks About Proposed Carbon Dioxide Limits ― And How They Could Play Out In Missouri

Credit Credit Syracuse University News Services

Earlier this summer, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever rule to cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants.

Under the new limits, Missouri would need to reduce its emissions by about 21 percent over the next 15 years.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra spoke with EPA Regional Administrator Karl Brooks about the plan, which Brooks said is designed to give states maximum flexibility.

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Environment
1:24 pm
Sun September 21, 2014

Missourians Participate In National Climate March

Limiting the consumption of fossil fuels is one of the goals of some environmental activists attending the People's Climate March.

Missourians are joining people from across the country in New York City Sunday for the People’s Climate March. Tens of thousands are expected to demonstrate in a call to halt global warming in advance of the United Nations Climate Summit, which begins Tuesday.

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Audubon Study
6:39 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Report: Climate Change Threatens Dozens of Missouri Birds

The White-Throated Sparrow is commonly seen in the St. Louis area during fall and winter, but a new report says climate change could reduce its breeding habitat.
Credit Dave Inman, Flickr Creative Commons

A recent report finds climate change is threatening dozens of birds that call Missouri home.

The National Audubon Society says more than half of the 588 North American bird species studied over the course of seven years are at risk. About 50 species common to Missouri are identified in the report as being threatened.

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Climate Change
6:48 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Missouri Institutions To Share $20 Million Grant To Study Climate Change

Part of the NSF grant will be used to study the effects of drought on plants, in particular corn. This image shows leaves of a single species of plant (not corn), grown under normal and drought conditions. An infrared scan can detect chemical changes in the drought-stressed leaf that are invisible to the human eye.
Credit Mikhail Berezin, Washington University

Updated 8/6/14:

The National Science Foundation has awarded $20 million to academic and research institutions across Missouri to study climate change.

Five states, plus the U.S. Virgin Islands, have received one of the NSF’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) grants.

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Cityscape
4:27 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Symposium Spotlights Midwest Environment, Sustainability

"30 Days of Demolition," a brick installation, outlines the footprint of residential property that stood from 1879 to 1971 at 3719 Washington Blvd.
Credit Michael Allen / Preservation Research Office

A five-day symposium with a funny name wants to promote environmental and sustainability awareness in the Midwest.

The Marfa Dialogues, which ends Sunday at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, includes several activities to highlight creative approaches to addressing environmental issues.

Architectural historian Michael Allen and installation artist Carlie Trosclair are creating an installation today that highlights urban demolition in St. Louis, “30 Days of Demolition.”

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Air Pollution - Climate Change
5:41 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

St. Louis NAACP Says Shifting From Coal To Renewables Would Benefit African Americans

St. Louis NAACP President Adolphus Pruitt spoke at a rally on Wednesday organized by the Sierra Club in support of taking action to prevent climate change. Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed (behind Pruitt) was also among the speakers.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

The local NAACP says air pollution from coal-fired power plants is having a disproportionate impact on the health of African Americans in the St. Louis area.

The civil rights organization joined the Sierra Club, Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed and others on Wednesday to rally in favor of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed limits on carbon dioxide emissions.

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Climate Change — Air Pollution
8:38 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

National Analysis Suggests Cutting Carbon Dioxide Would Improve Air Quality In Missouri

Coal-fired power plants produce pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury.
Credit Syracuse University News Services

Cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants would also reduce other types of air pollution, both here in Missouri and nationally.

That's according to a recent analysis by researchers at Harvard and Syracuse Universities.

Along with carbon dioxide, coal-fired power plants emit other pollutants, like sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Those in turn can contribute to forming particle pollution, ozone, and smog.

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Climate Change
8:18 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

New Carbon Dioxide Limits Could Mean Big Changes For Coal-Powered States Like Missouri, Illinois

Coal is transported by train from Wyoming to fuel Ameren Missouri's power plants, like this one in Labadie.
Credit Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the first-ever rules to cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. The proposal sparked immediate debate over the impact, especially in states such as Missouri that depend heavily on coal.

The new regulations would reduce carbon pollution from the power sector by 30 percent nationwide by 2030, compared to 2005 emissions levels.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:30 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Is Time Running Out To Address The World’s Population Explosion?

Alan Weisman, author of Countdown.
Credit media photo

In “Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth,” author Alan Weisman explored what it would take to bring the world’s population down to a sustainable level. The book is a sequel of sorts to Weisman’s bestselling “The World Without Us.”

The idea of “The World Without Us,” said Weisman, was to see how nature could recover from the effects of climate change without humans around to get in the way. But his hope in writing the book was to inspire the discovery of a way to add humans back into the equation.

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