Creve Coeur

car lot
Martin Kleppe | Flickr

On April 5, all St. Louis County voters, and residents of more than four dozen municipalities in St. Louis and St. Charles will see a variation of the following proposition, known as Proposition B  (A, V, or 1) on their ballot.

(via Flickr/functoruser)

The Missouri Court of Appeals heard oral arguments today in constitutional challenges to three red light camera ordinances in the St. Louis area.

(via Flickr/Josep_Ma)

A Missouri appeals court has upheld an ordinance in the suburban St. Louis city of Creve Coeur that imposes a $100 fine when cameras catch vehicles running red lights.

The Eastern District appeals court on Tuesday rejected an argument that the Creve Coeur ordinance violates due process rights by ticketing a vehicle's owner without knowing if the owner was driving when the vehicle ran a red light.

(via Flickr/Robert Scoble)

Officials in two suburbs of St. Louis have approved policies to control the deer populations.

Aldermen in the St. Louis County community of Town and Country voted 7-1 Monday for a six-month sharpshooting program. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the contract will go to White Buffalo Inc., the deer management firm that performed euthanasia and sterilization under previous city contracts.

Chesterfield has been named among the top-ten towns in the state by Missouri Life magazine.

Joplin was listed as the number one town, and was closely followed by Chesterfield, which ranked second.

UPDATE: 3:30 p.m. Jan. 24, 2011

The St. Louis Business Journal reports that Smurfit-Stone will lose its dual headquarters of in Creve Coeur, Mo. and Chicago when it is acquired by RockTenn.

The new combined company will be based out of RockTenn’s headquarters in Norcross, Ga., the Business Journal reports.

Temple Emanuel, a reform Jewish Synagogue in Creve Coeur, is currently hosting an exhibition of black and white portraits of Albanian Muslims. The men and women in the photographs helped save the lives of nearly 2,000 Jews who fled to Albania during WWII. David Weinberg tells the story of a place where something called "besa" or “word of honor” is a way of life.