Dolores Gunn | St. Louis Public Radio

Dolores Gunn

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County Councilman Steve Stenger wants the county’s second-in-command to resign. 

Stenger, D-Affton, said on Tuesday that Chief Operating Officer Garry Earls should be held accountable for, among other things, fraud in the county’s health department.

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Mayor Francis Slay
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | 2013 photo

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri could lose $8 billion in federal funding during the first six years of health reform if state lawmakers continue to refuse to expand Medicaid to insure more of the needy, according to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. She spoke during a stop in St. Louis for a meeting with St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, County Executive Charlie Dooley, health leaders and others working to help prepare consumers for the reform law’s insurance exchange marketplace, which opens for business on Oct. 1.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 26, 2012 - After years of wading through bundles of paperwork and paying steep fees, farmers' market advocates see promise in a push to overhaul regulations in St. Louis County.

But not all the feedback has been positive, with some managers concerned that the proposal could curtail winter markets. And at least one market manager says that the changes, while a step in the right direction, don't go far enough.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Dec. 13, 2011 - St. Louis County compares favorably to Missouri in smoking rates and percentage of residents lacking health insurance. But other pressing issues include higher incidences of cancer, high incidences of chlamydia and gonorrhea and high emergency department admissions for diabetes and others with chronic diseases.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 25, 2011 - The St. Charles County Council likely won't send an indoor smoking ban next week to county voters. But that doesn't mean the potentially precedent-setting debate is over.

(via Flickr/wild_turkey5300)

Despite cooler weather over the past several days, it's still mosquito season, and that means there's the potential for West Nile Virus cases.

The St. Louis County Department of Health has reported its first suspected human case. A 12-year-old boy from Wellston was briefly hospitalized with West Nile symptoms, though the department says he has returned to normal activities.

The county says there was one human case last year.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: September 24, 2008 - Give leaders in the public health field any reason to gather and you’re bound to hear chatter about disparities in funding and shortages of nurses. Put them on a panel in front of a large crowd at a television studio six weeks before a presidential election and prepare to hear a full-blown discussion about what’s ailing the country’s health care system.