economic development

Eight members of the Missouri Legislative Black Caucus formed the town hall panel Saturday, April 18, 2015. The only female caucus member present for most of the meeting was Rep. Kayla May, who moderated.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Job opportunity and municipal reform took center stage Saturday during a town hall discussion held by the Missouri Legislative Black Caucus. About 35 people attended the two hour meeting at Greater St. Mark Church in north St. Louis County, many submitting written questions that the eight panelists took turns answering.

HOK/360 Architecture

An effort to build a new stadium for the St. Louis Rams could hit a snag if a provision in President Barack Obama’s proposed budget makes it into law. Under the president’s budget plan, states and cities would no longer be able to use tax-exempt bonds to help pay for professional sports venues.

According to the latest U.S. census figures, St. Louis County is home to close to 30,000 non-farm-related businesses – about one-fifth of Missouri’s total -- that employ at least 546,000 people.

Add in one-person firms, such as real estate agents or solo-practice lawyers, and the number of county businesses swells to roughly 80,000.

/ Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

It's being billed as another way to spur economic development in the region.

St. Louis County and the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District announced Wednesday a new agreement to share software that will track and manage construction permits.

Officials from the two entities said having one system for permitting will be more cost-effective for both governmental agencies. It will also speed up the process for those seeking permits.

Speed is important when businesses are choosing between cities, said Joe Reagan, president and CEO of the St. Louis Regional Chamber.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Chesterfield received plenty of attention recently when it snagged two high-profile festivals away from the city of St. Louis. But the hubbub over the Taste of St. Louis and Bluesweek’s exodus may be part of a larger story. 

Robert P. Stupp: Leader In Business And Civic Endeavors

Mar 3, 2014
robert p. stupp
Provided by the family

Robert Philip Stupp, a business and community leader for many years died on March 2 after suffering a series of strokes. He was 83 years old. 

Mr. Stupp began his career with the Stupp Companies in 1952, serving as president of several divisions. He became the president and chief executive officer in 1989 and has been serving as chairman of Stupp Bros. Inc. since 2004.

Nanette Hegamin

Scholars involved in a five-part study that examines the well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region will seek public feedback on their research during a forum on March 3 at the Forest Park Visitor Center. The session, from 2 to 5 p.m., is free, but participants must sign up through the event registration page.

(via Flickr / davewing68, year added by St. Louis Public Radio)

As much as we like to think of the New Year as a clean slate, the issues and developments of the years before carry over. With that in mind, today on St. Louis on the Air we took a look at what the trends of the past 12 months can tell us about what the St. Louis region can expect in 2014.

The conversation focused on politics and the economy, with a special focus on innovation, entrepreneurship and diversity.

Guests in studio today were:

(Flickr Creative Commons User Andres Rueda)

The opportunity was too good to pass up. 

When Boeing decided to move production of its 777X passenger plane out of Seattle, states across the country were eager to offer their services. Missouri's political and business leaders were no exception.  They simply couldn't miss out on the chance to cement thousands of high-paying jobs for decades to come.

Mo. Senate

A Kansas City lawmaker is proposing legislation next year to address the so-called "Border War" between Missouri and Kansas over businesses weighing whether to relocate or stay put.

State Sen. Ryan Silvey, R-Kansas City, says his proposal would create a bilateral agreement between Kansas and Missouri, forbidding them from offering incentives to entice companies to move across the border to their opposite state.

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