education

Standardized testing
9:44 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Missouri Reconsiders How Many Tests Students Must Take

The state board of education has reduced the testing schedule dramatically. Education officials acknowledged that getting the same quality of information with fewer tests would be a challenge.
knittymarie Flickr

Can schools cut back sharply on the number of tests that students have to take and still get a good idea of how well they are learning?

The state of Missouri is about to find out.

Missouri's state board of education has reduced the testing schedule dramatically — just a few months after approving a spending request for a testing schedule that would have had third graders taking seven hours of standardized tests each year, and high schoolers taking nine exams in four different subjects.

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Obituary
4:41 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Robert P. Stupp: Leader In Business And Civic Endeavors

Robert P. Stupp
Credit Provided by the family

Robert Philip Stupp, a business and community leader for many years died on March 2 after suffering a series of strokes. He was 83 years old. 

Mr. Stupp began his career with the Stupp Companies in 1952, serving as president of several divisions. He became the president and chief executive officer in 1989 and has been serving as chairman of Stupp Bros. Inc. since 2004.

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Normandy school board
9:32 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Normandy Pushes For Caps On Tuition For Transfer Students

Ty McNichols
Credit Normandy website

Normandy’s school superintendent says the district’s finances can be helped if lawmakers would cap tuition paid for transfer students at the same amount that districts receive for accepting deseg students going from St. Louis to St. Louis County.

That amount, about $7,200 a year, is less than Normandy has been paying for most of its 1,000 students who transferred to nearby accredited districts at the start of the current school year. Tuition rates range to as high as $20,000, and the payments have put Normandy’s finances at a precarious point.

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Student Transfer Law
5:42 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Missouri Senate Passes Student Transfer Bill In Less Than 24 Hours

Bubbles | sxc.hu

(Story updated at 5:42 p.m. to include today's 3rd-read vote by the full Senate that sent SB 493 to the Missouri House.)

After spending two days debating and amending legislation to lessen the effects of Missouri's student transfer law, the state Senate overwhelmingly passed it Thursday.

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Higher education
3:42 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

McCoy Is Considered For Presidency At Harris-Stowe

Art McCoy, the embattled superintendent of the Ferguson-Florissant School District, is being considered for president of Harris-Stowe State University.
Ferguson-Florissant website Art McCoy

Art McCoy, who is currently on paid administrative leave from his job as superintendent of the Ferguson-Florissant School District, is in the running for the position 0f president of Harris-Stowe State University, St. Louis Public Radio and the Beacon has learned.

Asked about his candidacy for the job, McCoy said in an interview he did not want to discuss it while his status in Ferguson-Florissant remains unclear. But he did acknowledge that he had been asked by several people to consider the Harris-Stowe job, and he agreed to join the search pool.

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Student Transfer Law
2:22 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Missouri Senate Begins Debate On Student Transfer Bill

Mo. Capitol
UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri Senate has begun debate on legislation to lessen the effects of the state's student transfer law.

The wide-ranging bill attempts to address both the law and unaccredited districts.  Provisions within Senate Bill 493 include accrediting individual school buildings instead of districts as a whole and creating regional authorities across the state to oversee transfers.

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DESE public meeting
10:05 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Public Has Its Say On Missouri School Accreditation Plan

Chris Nicastro
Credit DESE website

Missouri education officials say their plan that was the subject of public comment at a meeting Tuesday night is designed to prevent school districts from losing accreditation in the future.

But for most of the night, the speakers and the audience were more concerned with what is going to happen to a district that already is unaccredited and is in danger of going out of business altogether: Normandy.

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Normandy school board
2:43 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Normandy Board Member Wants His Colleagues Voted Out

Terry Artis
Credit Normandy website

Updated 5:35 p.m. Tues, Feb. 25, with response from Humphrey:

Terry Artis, an outspoken member of the Normandy School District, says voters should oust three of his incumbent colleagues at the April 8 elections because they are not working in the best interests of the district.

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Education
8:46 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

During Rosa Parks Observance, Education Touted As Basic Civil Right

The Normandy High School Choir performs at an event honoring Rosa Parks on Feb. 23, 2014.
Tim Lloyd St. Louis Public Radio

Access to quality education as a basic civil right was a major theme during the NAACP’s Rosa Parks Observance Day ceremony Sunday at the Old Courthouse downtown.

“Education is definitely a top priority for us,” said John Gaskin, who was recently sworn in as a member of the NAACP’s National Board of Directors.  

A speech from suspended Ferguson Florissant School District Superintendent Art McCoy closed the event, and Gaskin said the choice sends a message that the civil rights organization is committed to putting classroom success above politics.

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Brown sisters
10:51 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Plaintiffs In School Desegregation Suit Say Goals Remain Elusive After 60 Years

Cheryl Brown Henderson
Credit Provided by SLU Law School

Nearly 60 years after school segregation was outlawed, two members of the family most associated with the case say that the St. Louis area student transfers show that the true goals of the Supreme Court's ruling remain unfulfilled.

Linda Brown Thompson and Cheryl Brown Henderson, whose Topeka, Kan., family was the lead plaintiff in the landmark 1954 ruling, told an audience at Saint Louis University law school Friday that their case was more about equality of resources and opportunity than simply letting black and white students sit together.

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