Election 2012

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would require special elections to fill vacancies in statewide offices.

If passed, House Bill 110 would only allow the Governor to appoint a temporary placeholder who would not be eligible to run in the special election.  House Speaker Pro-tem Jason Smith (R, Salem), the bill’s sponsor, says it’s not a deliberate swipe at Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee has overwhelmingly passed legislation that would require special elections to fill vacancies in statewide offices.

House Bill 110 would require special elections if the office of Lt. Governor or any other statewide office is suddenly vacated.  It would allow the Governor to only appoint a placeholder who would temporarily fill the office but not be eligible to run in the special election.  It’s sponsored by House Speaker Pro-tem Jason Smith (R, Salem).

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri’s presidential electors gathered at the State Capitol today and cast their ballots for Republicans Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan, who lost last month to incumbent Democrats Barack Obama and Joe Biden.

Despite the nationwide results, Missouri’s 10 electors were still committed to cast their ballots for the Romney/Ryan ticket.  State Representative Stanley Cox (R, Sedalia) was one of those 10.  He said it was a little interesting to cast an electoral ballot for someone he knows won’t be president.   

“I guess, you know, I made a moral commitment to a bunch of people back in June that I would do this, so it’s not hard to do," Cox said.  "I certainly think he’d have made a great president, although I know he’s not going to be president.”

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Republican Missouri congressman Todd Akin owes almost $270,000 after his unsuccessful challenge of Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill.

A federal finance report available online Thursday shows Akin's committee spent about $6 million on his Senate campaign - less than a third of the $19.3 million spent by McCaskill.

Akin reported $268,830 of debt as of Nov. 26. McCaskill previously reported that she had $238,010 of debt as of that date. But it's often easer for winners than losers to raise money to pay off their campaign debts.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri Democratic statewide candidates cruised to victory statewide on Nov. 6, but the party’s standard-bearer, Barack Obama lost the state by nearly 10 percent. Why? Ray Hartmann says the answer is race. Here’s how Democrat Gwen Reed and Republican Paul Zemitzsch responded.

(Photo By: Richard Stamelman / Provided By: Random House)

The guest on today’s program was Calvin Trillin.  He’s a guest of top billin’.

He talked with host Don Marsh.  It was an interview, which despite the political climate, was not harsh.

Trillin is a journalist, humorist, and author of “Dog Fight: The 2012 Presidential Campaign in Verse.”  It’s a volume of poetry, concise but not terse.

Trillin was born and raised in Kansas City.  Discussion of politics is witty, and focuses less on Obama than it does on Mitty.

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A week after the conservative losses at the polls, about 20 tea partiers gathered at a restaurant in North St. Louis County to listen to a few lecturers talk about a few ideas for the future: the flat tax and the fair tax. And yes, to commiserate about the recent past.

“If we can’t even elect a Republican president with Barack Obama as his opponent, how in God's name do we propose to eliminate the tax code?” Bill Hennessy, who helped found the St. Louis Tea Party, asked. He was visibly frustrated.

(Judy Schmidt, James Gathany / CDC)

On November 6, 2012, Missouri voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition E, which prohibited the Governor or any state agency from establishing or operating a state-based health insurance exchange without legislative or citizen approval.

The Affordable Care Act, however, moves on toward full implementation in 2014.

Host Don Marsh talked with Sidney Watson, Professor of Law at Saint Louis University’s Health Law Policy Center, and Ryan Barker, Director of Health Policy for the Missouri Foundation for Health.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Name:  Clifford Franklin

Party:  Democrat

Job:  Chief Executive Officer, Fuse Advertising

Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri voters have narrowly defeated an effort to raise the state’s tobacco tax.

If Proposition B had passed, the tax on a pack of cigarettes would have gone from the lowest in the nation, at 17 cents, up to 90 cents.

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

The election is over and despite some predictions that the results would take a considerable amount of time to trickle in and may even be unknown for a few days, that was not the case.

Democratic U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill handedly won re-election, defeating Republican Congressman Todd Akin.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Nov 7, 2012

It's the post-election Politically Speaking special. Chris McDaniel of St. Louis Public Radio joins Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum of the St. Louis Beacon to wrap up last night's races.

We go through McCaskill's decisive win over Akin (was he trounced or shellacked?) as well as all the state-wide races. We also throw in a couple Congressional seats, Missouri legislature make-up, and the ballot initiative results.

 

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

Frank Morris/KCUR

The U.S. Senate race in Missouri was sewed up by Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill by 10 p.m. last night.

McCaskill got nearly 58 percent of Missouri ‘s vote compared to Republican Congressman Todd Akin’s 39 percent.

Early in the campaign, pundits predicted McCaskill would not be able to hold onto her seat.

But as St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman reports, it was a race filled with strange turns.

Starting with an upward battle

Claire McCaskill was one of the GOP’s top targets in their attempt to take back the U.S. Senate.

Wagner Takes Akin's Old Congressional Seat

Nov 7, 2012
Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio

In the race to take Congressman Akin’s old seat, Republican Ann Wagner soundly trounced Democrat Glenn Koenen. At her election night party, Wagner said she got into this race because she was a “fed up mother.”

“And you know what? I think our country needs some tough love," Wagner told the crowd. "And I’m ready to deliver that – that I promise you.”

Wagner held her campaign party at the Frontenac Hilton, the same place as Republican gubernatorial candidate Dave Spence. But the two decided to hold their events in different ballrooms at the same hotel.

Americans elected Barack Obama to a second term Tuesday, with the president capturing or on the verge of winning all of the key states that had been at the center of his hard-fought campaign against Republican Mitt Romney.

"Whether I earned your vote or not, I have listened to you," Obama said early Wednesday at a speech before thousands of supporters in Chicago. "I have learned from you. And you've made me a better president.

(Provided by Plummer for Congress)

A Republican lumber company executive is conceding defeat in a southern Illinois congressional race.

Jason Plummer made Wednesday's announcement a day after voters in the 12th Congressional District elected Democrat Bill Enyart, a Belleville lawyer who has headed the Illinois National Guard. The Green Party's Paula Bradshaw finished third.

Plummer says in a one-paragraph statement e-mailed to The Associated Press that he thanks the thousands of supporters, volunteers and friends who backed his campaign.

Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio

Will be updated.

St. Louis Public Radio reporters went out around the city and county today, speaking to voters across the region. Here are some of the experiences they had:

Early problems, followed by smooth sailing

The long lines at St. Peters African Methodist Episcopal Church in the Penrose neighborhood had disappeared by lunchtime.

Earlier in the day, more than 100 people walked away after poll workers did not have the book listing registered voters in one precinct.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

Will be updated.

Early indications are that Missouri officials' prediction of a strong turnout for the election might be accurate.

The Missouri Secretary of State's Office is reporting there were long lines shortly after polls opened at 6 a.m. today. The office is also receiving many phone calls from people checking their registration or verifying their polling places.

The Kappa House, a polling place in midtown St. Louis, had a steady stream of voters late this morning. 19-year-old Treniece Stockard was one of them. Among her concerns? Student loans.

voxefxtm | Flickr

It’s Election Day and while we won’t know the results until this evening, we take the beginning of our program to check in with reporters at several polling locations to see how the voting process is moving along.

Host Don Marsh talks with St. Louis Public Radio’s Julie Bierach and Tri States Public Radio’s Jason Parrott about voting in St. Louis, Missouri and Quincy, Illinois.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI | 2012 photo

Thank you for joining us for Election Day, and later, election night. Our live blog has concluded, but our coverage isn't over.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri U.S. Senate candidate Todd Akin believes surging support will pull him through.

The Republican spent his final full day of campaigning on Monday by thanking supporters at several stops in the St. Louis area. In St. Peters, he told a couple of dozen volunteers that he sees what he called a "fire and enthusiasm" for his campaign to unseat Democrat Claire McCaskill.

McCaskill was making several stops around the state on Monday.

McCaskill says voters will have a choice between a moderate and an extremist when they cast ballots Tuesday in the U.S. Senate race. 

Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio

The race for U.S. Senate in Missouri between Democratic incumbent Senator Claire McCaskill and Republican Congressman Todd Akin is close and has garnered national attention.

Recent polling data shows Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney leads in Missouri, as does McCaskill over Akin, by a slim margin.

Gubernatorial Candidates Running On Same Issue: Jobs

Nov 5, 2012
(Nixon: via Missouri Governor’s website, Spence: courtesy Alpha Packaging)

Four years ago, Missouri Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon was elected by 19 points: a landslide. But this time around, it may not be so easy for him. Some polls show St. Louis businessman and Republican gubernatorial candidate Dave Spence within striking distance of the Governor. The race has been personal at times, but it’s primarily been about one overarching issue: jobs.

Dave Spence owns a couple of plastics businesses. One of those businesses is Alpha Packaging.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Name:  Patrick Werner

Party: Republican

Age: 41

Job:  State Director, Americans for Prosperity-Missouri

Education: Quincy University, Webster University

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When it comes to politics, Art Perry leans to the left; Emory Kesteloot to the right. The two are neighbors and friends in St. Louis’s Central West End and started our series of Back Fence columns in which  friends, relatives and neighbors disagree agreeably about issues in the 2012 campaign. Recently they exchanged e-mails about America’s debt problems.

Geoff Story

There’s a new effort in St. Louis to help people get to the polls next Tuesday.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Name:  Michael Kelley

Party: Democrat

Age:  37

Twitter: @mskstl

Education: University of Missouri – St. Louis

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Nov 1, 2012

It's the last Politically Speaking before the election. As always, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum from the St. Louis Beacon to discuss a few political issues.

On today’s podcast: We wrap up the Missouri Senate race with Congressman Todd Akin and Senator Claire McCaskill. We then talk about our impressions of turnout in general in the St. Louis area -- which is currently down according to absentee voting numbers. And finally, Jo gives us some trivia knowledge for some historic presidential races.

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

In the last of four discussions as part of our town hall meeting about statewide ballot issues we take a look at Amendment 3, concerning proposed changes to the way some judges are selected in Missouri.

Host Don Marsh talks with Republican state Senator Jim Lembke of St. Louis County and former Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court William Ray Price, Jr.  Lembke says Amendment 3 is a step in the right direction while Price opposes it.

Official Ballot Title: (source: Missouri Secretary of State website)

Robert Peterson / St. Louis Public Radio

In the third of four discussions as part of our town hall meeting about statewide ballot issues we take a look at Proposition B, concerning a tobacco tax increase.

Host Don Marsh talks with Dudley McCarter, an attorney and board member of Missourians for Health and Education, and Ron Leone, the Executive Director of the Missouri Petroleum Marketers & Convenience Store Association. 

McCarter supports Proposition B and Leone opposes it.

Official Ballot Title: (source: Missouri Secretary of State website)

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