Environment Missouri

St. Louis On The Air
6:15 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Local Journalist Details Missouri's Environmental Issues in New Book

Don Corrigan also discussed issues with the smoldering Bridgeton Landfill during the conversation and in his book.
Credit Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio

 Missourians need to be worried – and need to act.

That is the message of Environmental Missouri: Issues and Sustainability — What You Need to Know, a new book from Webster University journalism professor and Times Newspapers editor Don Corrigan.  The book is an overview of various aspects of our environment and sustainability shortfalls – in addition to what we are doing right.

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Environment
10:42 pm
Sun March 30, 2014

Commentary: Edgar Denison Left A Legacy In A Patch Of Blue-Eyed Mary

Collinsia verna, Blue-eyed Mary
Credit Provided by Scott Woodbuyr

Blue-eyed Mary is a Missouri wildflower that germinates in winter, enduring freeze and thaw before blooming in spring. Its bloom spans the month of April when Virginia bluebells, wild geranium and wild sweet William are each making colorful contributions to shady Missouri woodlands. In nature it grows along rivers in carpets where fall flooding carries away leaf litter, allowing seeds to germinate successfully.

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Missouri State Parks
4:16 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Missouri Environmental Agency Says $400 Million Needed For State Parks

Stuart Keating of Environment Missouri speaks at a press conference at the Coronado Ballroom in St. Louis.
Kristin McGuire/Environment Missouri

Environment Missouri, a state environmental advocacy group, kicked off its campaign today by calling on state legislators to take action on what they say are $400 million worth of back-logged repairs to state parks.

The organization says that state parks are crucial to the economy, bringing an average of 18 million visitors a year, and providing over 14,000 jobs.

Parks are currently funded by (bear with me) half of a one-tenth-of-one-cent sales tax, a tax voters have continued to renew over the years. But Environment Missouri thinks that it’s not enough.

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Ozark Rivers - Management
6:11 pm
Tue August 21, 2012

Environmental organizations to National Park Service: protect Ozark rivers

Horseback riding is a popular activity in the Ozarks, but horses' waste has been linked to high E. coli levels in the Jacks Fork, the main tributary of the Current River.
(Mark Morgan/University of Missouri)

A statewide coalition of environmental organizations is urging the National Park Service to protect Ozark rivers.

Representatives of the groups were in Washington, D.C., today meeting with the Park Service.

They submitted more than 4,400 signed petitions asking the federal agency to adopt a strong management plan for the Current River and its major tributary, the Jacks Fork.

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Morning Round-up
8:42 am
Fri March 23, 2012

Morning headlines: Friday, March 23, 2012

Eads Bridge connecting St. Louis and East St. Louis over the Mississippi River. The Mississippi River is the second-most toxic river in the United States.
(via flickr/benclark)

Mississippi River is second-most toxic river in United States

A new report released by Environment Missouri says the Mississippi River is the second-most toxic river in the nation.

Data released Thursday shows that 12 million pounds of toxins were dumped into the Mississippi in 2010, with 672,000 pounds being released in Missouri. The only waterway more toxic is the Ohio River.

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Climate Change - Extreme Weather
10:00 am
Thu February 16, 2012

Weather disasters hitting Missouri hard, says new report

A new report by Environment Missouri discusses recent weather disasters, climate change, and regulation of carbon dioxide emissions.
(Environment Missouri)

A new report from Environment Missouri presents data on U.S. federally-declared weather disasters from 2006 to 2011, and says climate change will make extreme weather events like droughts and storms more common – and more severe.

State advocate for Environment Missouri, Ted Mathys, says 2011 was a particularly bad year for extreme weather in Missouri and across the country.

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Ozark Rivers - Management
6:14 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Environmentalists urge National Park Service to protect the Current River

Ted Mathys, state advocate for Environment Missouri (at podium) and other environmentalists urged the National Park Service to protect the Current River in Missouri during a press conference at St. Louis' City Hall on Dec. 13, 2011.
(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

Updated at 6:10 pm to add Congresswoman Emerson's response.

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Science/Mercury in Mo.
4:48 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Mo. among top states in airborne mercury pollution

Ameren’s 2,400-megawatt plant near Labadie, Mo., is the state’s largest coal-fired power plant.
(Véronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

A new report released today by Environment Missouri shows power plants in the state produce more airborne mercury than 46 other states.

The report, which uses data from the Environmental Protection Association's toxic inventory release, found that of the nearly 4,000 pounds of mercury that Missouri's 17 coal-fired power plants released in 2010, more than 70 percent came from four plants owned by Ameren Missouri.

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Air pollution - ozone
3:50 pm
Thu September 22, 2011

Report ranks St. Louis 10th smoggiest U.S. city

A September 2011 Environment Missouri report on smog pollution ranks St. Louis air quality among the worst in the nation.

A new report released today by the advocacy group Environment Missouri ranks St. Louis as the 10th smoggiest metropolitan area in the country.

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Mercury Pollution
5:09 pm
Thu February 10, 2011

Illinois, Missouri among nation's top mercury polluters

A screen capture of the cover of the report from Environment Missouri on mercury pollution. (Environment Missouri website)

Updated at 5:00 p.m. with comment from Ameren Missouri.

A new report suggests that power plants in Illinois and Missouri are among the nation’s top emitters of mercury pollution.

Mercury can cause serious health problems for both wildlife and people who eat contaminated fish.

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