Eric Greitens | St. Louis Public Radio

Eric Greitens

Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

The first open hearing of the Missouri House committee investigating Gov. Eric Greitens featured some heated exchanges between members and the governor’s attorneys.

Committee members heard from Ed Greim and Ross Garber, two attorneys hired by Greitens “in his capacity as governor.” They appeared before the committee Wednesday to propose several rules and a tentative schedule for the 30-day, special legislative session, which begins Friday at 6:30 p.m.

Joining host Don Marsh on Tuesday’s show to unpack the developments of the past 24 hours were (from left) St. Louis Public Radio reporter Rachel Lippmann, former Missouri Supreme Court chief justice Michael Wolff and STLPR reporter Jason Rosenbaum.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the surprising turn of events that made headlines late Monday afternoon in the continuing legal saga surrounding Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

As St. Louis Public Radio reported Monday, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner dropped the felony invasion of privacy charge against Greitens after the prosecutor was herself endorsed as a witness in the case. The news came with jury selection for the trial already well underway.

Governor Eric Greitens speaks to reporters outside the Civil Courts Building in downtown St. Louis after his felony invasion of privacy charge was dropped. May 14, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In a saga that’s featured twists, turns, drama and intrigue, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s decision to drop a felony invasion of privacy charge was genuinely surprising.

Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

The committee investigating Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens released two emails this morning, one that suggests he might have tried to hide some campaign donations.

However, Greitens’ use of outside groups to not identify some donors has been known publicly for at least two years. He previously had defended the practice as necessary to protect donors.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens walks out of the Civil Courts Building in downtown St. Louis after his felony invasion of privacy charge was dropped. May14, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

In a stunning move, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner has dropped the felony invasion of privacy charge against Gov. Eric Greitens — short-circuiting the unprecedented trial of a sitting Missouri chief executive.

While Gardner’s office is promising to refile the case with a special prosecutor, the governor’s attorneys are confident that another prosecutor won’t touch the case.

State Rep. Peter Merideth, D-St. Louis
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome state Rep. Peter Merideth to the program.

Merideth is a St. Louis Democrat who represents south-central portions of the city in the Missouri House. He was elected to his seat in 2016 and is running for re-election later this year.

Defense attorney Scott Rosenblum leaves the Civil Courts building in downtown St. Louis on May 10, the first day of jury selection in Governor Eric Greitens' felony invasion of privacy trial.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Opening arguments in Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' felony invasion of privacy trial have been pushed back until at least Wednesday, as jury selection is taking longer than expected.

Attorneys will spend a third day Monday questioning potential jurors about how much they have heard about the case, and whether they've formed any early opinions.

St. Louis Circuit Court Judge Rex Burlison speaks with a reporter as St. Louis Sheriff Vernon Betts escorts him into the courthouse on May 10, 2018.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Rachel Lippmann, Marshall Griffin and Jo Mannies break down all of the developments this week in Gov. Eric Greitens’ political and legal saga.

This week’s episode gives a preview of the governor’s felony invasion of privacy trial, which is slated to get started next week. We also get an update on whether legislators will impeach the governor — and the status of Greitens’ second felony charge for computer data tampering.

News crews sit outside the Civil Courts Building during the first day of jury selection in Gov. Eric Greitens' felony invasion of privacy trial. May 10, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Defense attorneys for Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens say an examination of his phone has turned up no evidence of the photo at the center of his felony invasion of privacy trial.

Greitens is accused of taking a partially nude and nonconsensual photo of a woman with whom he was having an affair.

The governor’s attorneys said in court Friday that a third party reviewed 16,000 images and saw none connected to the woman. Furthermore, they said a technician found no evidence that a photo was deleted.

Michelle Nasser and Scott Rosenblum, members of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' defense team, arrive at the St. Louis Civil Courts building Thursday morning for the first day of jury selection in Greitens' felony invasion of privacy trial. 051018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 8:00 p.m. May 10 with more information from the first day — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was in a St. Louis courtroom Thursday watching jury selection for his upcoming invasion of privacy trial slowly unfold.

Wearing a business suit and a purple tie, Greitens spent most of the day quietly conferring with his attorneys. He’s accused of taking a photograph of a woman with whom he had an affair without her consent — and placing it in a position to be accessed by a computer.

Susan McGraugh talked to "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh about the process of jury selection.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Jury selection is underway in the felony invasion of privacy trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens. There are currently 160 prospective jurors, who will be questioned until the first day of trial, which is scheduled for Monday.

Susan McGraugh, professor of law and supervisor of the Criminal Defense Clinic at Saint Louis University, joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh to talk about the voire dire process, which began Thursday.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Editor's note: This is the third in a series of three stories profiling the main legal figures involved in the trial of Gov. Eric Greitens. A profile of the prosecution ran Tuesday, and a profile of the defense attorneys ran Wednesday.

Nearly 200 St. Louis residents will walk into the Civil Courts building in downtown St. Louis Thursday morning in response to a jury summons for the felony invasion of privacy trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

They'll eventually file into a seventh floor courtroom, where Circuit Judge Rex Burlison will preside, to learn if they will help determine the governor’s guilt.

Civil Courts building, St. Louis
File photo | Rachel Heidenry

St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison has rejected a media request to record audio during the felony trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

Burlison ruled Wednesday that still photography would be allowed for the first 10 minutes of the first day of trial, which is scheduled for Monday. He had previously rejected video recording of the trial, although it will be broadcast into an overflow courtroom for media and the public.

Political consultant and lobbyist Mike Hafner
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Within days after Mike Hafner began work in January 2015 as a full-time campaign staffer for Republican Eric Greitens, Hafner says he was presented with a copy of the donor list for The Mission Continues, the charity that Greitens helped found.

“We had set a meeting to discuss the donor list, so I could get notes from Eric and build a fundraising plan for his potential candidacy,” Hafner said in an interview Wednesday.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Editor's note: This is the second in a series of three stories profiling the main legal figures involved in the trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens. A profile of the prosecution ran Tuesday. A profile of the judge will run Thursday.

The felony trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, which starts Thursday with jury selection, has the makings of an epic courtroom skirmish.

As one attorney put it, the case is an All-Star Game for the legal community, and a sizable amount of talent is batting for the governor.

Rep. Shamed Dogan, R-Ballwin
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome state Rep. Shamed Dogan to the program.

Dogan is a Republican from Ballwin. He was first elected to the Missouri House in 2014 and was re-elected in 2016. He decided to run for another House term in 2018 after mulling over whether to run for St. Louis County executive.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Editor's note: This is the first in a series of three stories profiling the main legal figures involved in the trial of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens. A profile of the defense attorneys will run Wednesday and the judge on Thursday.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner made history in February when she charged Gov. Eric Greitens with felony invasion of privacy. It was the first time a Missouri governor had been indicted.

In the indictment made public Feb. 22, Gardner said that in 2015, Greitens took a photo of the woman with whom he was having an affair, while she was semi-nude, and then transmitted it so that it could be viewed on a computer.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens helped engineer a freeze on low-income housing tax credits. And that decision is likely to stand unless the legislature makes substantial changes to the program.
File photo I Carolina Hidaglo | St. Louis Public Radio

A St. Louis judge overseeing Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy trial has declined to prevent his accuser from testifying.

That decision Monday was part of a slew of rulings that could end up shaping Greitens’ trial. He’s accused of taking a semi-nude photo of a woman he with whom he had an affair without her consent — and placing it in a position where it could be electronically transmitted. And it also came as St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office conceded again they did not have the photo in their possession.

An email sent to St. Louis Public Radio about a now-scuttled soccer stadium prompted Attorney General Josh Hawley to once again look into Gov. Eric Greitens’ social media policies. Jan. 2017
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s not every day that a sentence in a 14-month-old article is the catalyst behind an attorney general inquiry into a sitting governor.

But that’s exactly what’s happened in April, when an email sent to St. Louis Public Radio about a now-scuttled soccer stadium prompted Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley to look again into Gov. Eric Greitens’ social media policies.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks with reporters after touring Our Lady's Inn, a St. Louis pregnancy center for women experiencing homelessness, on June 8, 2017.
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann examine what turned out to be a very busy week in the legal and political saga of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens.

This week’s edition of the podcast zeroes in on a historic special session to possibly consider impeachment — and a second House committee report regarding the acquisition of a fundraising list from the Mission Continues.

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