FCC

Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

It’s hard to imagine a time in which laptops, iPhone and satellite television weren’t immediately accessible and yet, in 1991, those opportunities were merely considered a brave new world. Imagine trying to set up a system of governance for a world that doesn’t exist yet. That’s exactly what former Federal Communications Commission Chairman Alfred C. Sikes, a Missouri native, was tasked with doing.

As the New York Times wrote in 1991:

Missouri needs more internet service producers to connect underground fiber networks to customers to increase high-speed internet access, a new FCC report says.
Dan Chace | Flickr

Nearly a third of Missourians - or about 1.8 million people - lack access to high-speed internet, according to a report last month from the Federal Communications Commission. That means Missouri ranks 15th among all states for the highest percentage of residents not served by fiber networks that can deliver such high speeds.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: WASHINGTON – When it comes to stopping pesky robocalls, U.S Sen. Claire McCaskill likens the process to playing Whack-a-Mole in a space that has become a “criminal sandbox” for phone scammers.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)  is expressing outrage at the Lifeline government phone program operated by the Federal Communications Commission. The program provides free cell phones to low income people who qualify for welfare and food stamps.

McCaskill says that no one is making sure that people don’t receive more than one phone and there is no way to keep people from selling them.

The democrat says there appears to be no accountability between Lifeline and those distributing the phones.