A line of police face off with protesters on West Florissant Ave., last Sunday night.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Revised following conference call - The St. Louis County police department is falling short of best practices in several critical areas.

That is the conclusion of the latest report on policing post-Ferguson released Friday by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Community-Oriented Policing Services. The voluntary review, requested by Chief Jon Belmar more than a year ago, found 50 areas where the department can improve, and includes 109 recommendations.

photo of Barbara Harbach
Stephanie Zettl

For good reasons and for bad ones, the north St. Louis County city of Ferguson has acquired an international reputation. Its name has spread through conversations about social justice and inequities, including economic and educational issues. Art also has spread impressions of the city, more positive than not, and has come to play a significant, sometimes cathartic role in the life of Ferguson.

Most of the works of art are visual – drawings, paintings on wood used to board up buildings, even professionally produced prints that exalt the hands-up posture. There had not been a major musical endeavor such as a symphony. Now there is.

A Ferguson police officer and police dog stand by a police vehicle outside the Ferguson Police Department.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

The federal government is giving Missouri money to help law enforcement agencies cover some of the costs associated with paying overtime for officers who responded to the violence in Ferguson in the days following the shooting death of Michael Brown.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., says the $1,011,433 in grants will go to the Missouri Department of Public Safety “and then they’ll decide how to divide that up among the various police organizations that have expended money and resources as a result of what happened in Ferguson.”

Wellspring Church in Ferguson, September 21, 2015.
Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

Now that the Ferguson Commission has made its report, what are St. Louisans thinking? Monday at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, many expressed frustration — with officials, obstacles and each other. But another note sounded clearly through the discontent: determination to press forward.

POST Commission members include Emanuel Cleaver III (left) and Sgt. Jeffery Hughley Jr., (center).
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri state commission tasked with developing new training and professional standards for law enforcement held a public hearing on Thursday. More than a dozen residents, elected officials and members of law enforcement took to the podium to voice their opinions in the student center at St. Louis Community College Florissant Valley over the course of two hours.  

Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

After the Ferguson Commission's report was released last week, St. Louisans across the region seemed to be echoing a common refrain: “But what can I do with it?” That was a question that “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh tried to answer at Monday night’s public town hall “Ferguson Commission:  Where Do We Go From Here?”

Kelly Moffitt / St. Louis Public Radio

At our latest forum at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, we wanted to help those attending visualize their top priority for moving Ferguson forward.

We gave each person attending the event a blue dot. They were asked to then assign the dot to their top priority in one of four areas:  

Wellspring Church in Ferguson, September 21, 2015.
Kelly Moffitt, St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 1:20 p.m., Sept. 22, with audio - Change can come to the St. Louis region, but people throughout the area have to be willing to do the work.

That was the message Monday night at a roundtable at Wellspring Church in Ferguson looking at the 189 recommendations outlined in the report of the Ferguson Commission.

Want to hear Part Two of the two-part "Ferguson Commission: Where Do We Go From Here?" panel? You can find it here

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

This is Kameel Stanley's inaugural article for St. Louis Public Radio's We Live Here project. We asked her to introduce herself. Here is what she wrote:

Two things have consistently come up since I moved to St. Louis a few weeks ago.

Namely, my roots and my race.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The Ferguson Commission has released its long-awaited report filled with calls to action for St. Louis government, the criminal justice system and the community. Join St. Louis Public Radio for a public town hall on Monday, Sept. 21, to discuss the report’s recommendations and what can be done to make them a reality beyond Ferguson and effect positive changes in the area.

The Ferguson Commission Report is out, with 44 signature recommendations. The commission divided their calls to action into three groups: Justice For All, Youth at the Center, and Opportunity to Thrive.

Because everything can't be priority one, we want to ask: What would YOUR priorities be from these recommendations?

The Ferguson Commission received $150,000 worth of donations from six groups. It also hired one of its members — Bethany Johnson-Javois — to be the commission's managing director.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

As the Ferguson Commission prepares to release its report Monday, looking back may be useful to put the work in context. Three hundred people responded to Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s call to serve on the Ferguson Commission, which he said would have three main tasks:

Attorney Al Gerhardstein speaks at Wednesday's meeting of the Ferguson Commission. Gerhardstein helped fashion a collaborative agreement to alter the Cincinnati Police Department.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

With only a few days before they release their final report, members of the Ferguson Commission got something of a reality check from Al Gerhardstein.

Gerhardstein is an attorney who helped negotiate a landmark agreement in Cincinnati that brought massive changes to the city’s police department. As he looked at some of the commission’s recommendations to overhaul the region’s law enforcement agencies, Gerhardstein worried aloud that he was experiencing déjà vu.

(Sarah Kellogg/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Jewish New Year begins at sundown Sunday. It's the start of 10 days of prayer and reflection for lay people and clergy alike.

Susan Talve, of Central Reform Congregation, and Rori Picker Neiss of Bais Abraham, an Orthodox synagogue, have much to reflect upon. Each in her own way emerged in the Jewish year 5775 as a leading voice in the protests inspired by the death of Michael Brown.

They sat down with St. Louis Public Radio's Rachel Lippmann to consider what the past year means.

Protesters are greeted by a wall of police officers after a march to the Ferguson Police department on August 11, 2014.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI / UPI

A report from the Department of Justice on how police responded to protests in Ferguson following the shooting death of Michael Brown last summer has drawn praise and criticism from individuals who were involved in the protests on all sides.

Protesters are greeted by lines of state and county police during a demonstration march on the Ferguson police station on August 11, 2014.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

A report by the U.S. Department of Justice examines a chaotic and often uncoordinated response to the protests that erupted after the shooting death of Michael Brown in August 2014.

The Department’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services on Wednesday released its after-action report on the police response to the 17 days between when Brown was shot and killed by former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson and his funeral.

Deborah Gambill and Ronald Montgomery display their collaborative effort, "Let's Heal STL."
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

In November 2014 a St. Louis County grand jury ruled against indicting Ferguson Police officer Darren Wilson for shooting Michael Brown. Announcement of the decision sparked protest, and later on in the night, violence wracked Ferguson and parts of St. Louis.

Brian Owens joined "St. Louis on the Air" in studio.
Áine O'Connor | St. Louis Public Radio

Soul singer Brian Owens has called Ferguson home for about nine years and encapsulates his experience there as “interesting, frustrating,” and ultimately, “hopeful.”

Now, Owens capitalizes the “hopeful” part by presenting a Labor Day weekend concert. The Soul of Ferguson Community Festival is based on a simple idea, Owens said: unifying the community with healing, peace and music.

We Must Stop Killing Each Other signs are posted on the security gate of a building near where Mansur Ball-Bey was shot by police.
Linda Lockhart I St. Louis Public Radio

Two recent deaths – the police killing of Mansur Ball-Bey and the incomprehensible shooting of 9-year-old Jamyla Bolden – felt like giant steps backward for a region already plagued by violence and mistrust. This week, St. Louisans took three small but significant steps forward, beginning to address the underlying problems that breed despair.

Interim Ferguson Police Chief Andre Anderson announces the arrest of De'Eris Brown for the shooting death of nine-year-old Jamyla Bolden Thursday Aug. 27, 2015 at the Ferguson Police Department.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

An O'Fallon, Mo., man is facing six felony counts including murder in the second degree in last week's shooting in Ferguson that killed 9-year-old Jamyla Bolden and wounded her mother.

Police said Thursday De'Eris Brown, 21, confessed to shooting into Bolden’s home. Brown is being held on a $750,000 cash-only bond. Court records show Brown previously pleaded guilty to felony robbery.