Gender | St. Louis Public Radio

Gender

Psychologist Wes Crenshaw joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss how to talk about gender identity with a new generation and vocabulary in hand.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Kansas-based psychologist Wes Crenshaw works with young adults on a variety of issues, but in the past years he’s been focusing specifically on young people’s evolving attitudes on gender identity.

Crenshaw is a psychologist, author and certified sex therapist with Family Psychological Services, LCC.

He’s about to finish a book, “Consent-Based Sex Education: Parenting Teens in the Internet Age,” which deals specifically with how to talk to kids about gender identity when the kids seem better versed in the subject matter than parents do.

Anniversary (B&D), 2012, 44“ x 57”, digital print on Somerset Velvet, edition # 1/3.   Bruno David
Courtesy of Bruno David Projects and the Artist

Heather Bennett’s photography often leads her on a quest for objects like classic cars, vintage dresses and snakeskin purses. Sometimes the props are a little stranger. During one shoot Bennett searched for a pair of brass knuckles, but had no luck.  Bennett's friend was a model for the shoot, and surprised Bennett. He offered to let her use his pair.

“I was like why do two of my friends have brass knuckles? I was a little shocked by that,” said the photographer.

Provided by Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

When playwright Daniel Pearle was a preschooler in the late 1980s, he was fascinated by a classic fairy-tale character dressed in pink.

“I did have a fondness for all things Cinderella,” Pearle said.

Pearle brings his childhood experiences to his play “A Kid Like Jake,” now on stage at The St. Louis Repertory Theatre.“Jake” is the story of two New York City parents, worried about their 4-year-old son’s dress-up play and whether he can get into the “right” kindergarten.

Gender Wage Gap Persists In Missouri

Oct 29, 2014
a rolling dollar bill
dleafy | sxc.hu

While the gender wage gap has narrowed over the last 50 years, the improvement has not been significant, according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.

In Missouri, the median earnings for a woman working full-time is $32,000 while the median earnings for a man working full-time is $43,000, said lawyer Donna Harper, a partner at Sedey Harper P.C., which specializes in employment law.

“Women make about three-fourths of what men make when they’re both employed full time, at least in Missouri,” Harper told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Wednesday.