General Obligation Bond | St. Louis Public Radio

General Obligation Bond

A city tow truck brings a St. Louis Fire Department ambulance in for  repairs.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

For the second time in seven months, voters in the city of St. Louis are being asked to authorize borrowing for major capital needs.

Last August, voters rejected Proposition 1, which would have funded $180 million in borrowing with a property tax increase. On April 5, city residents will consider a smaller version of that proposal in Proposition F.

The Ways and Means committee has approved the purchase of a site in the Botanical Heights neighborhood to house and maintain trash trucks.
Screenshot | Google Maps

St. Louis has picked a place to store and maintain its fleet of trash trucks, setting in motion a process that could lead to 200 new jobs in the city.

The Board of Aldermen on Wednesday authorized the city to spend about $12 million to purchase a site on Central Industrial Drive, between two railroad tracks in the Botanical Heights neighborhood, and to pay for the necessary build-out.

Veronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen on Tuesday put a $25 million bond issue on the April ballot. Now, elected officials have to go out and convince their constituents to support it.

Aldermen approved, and Mayor Francis Slay signed, the additional borrowing on Tuesday. It was the last day to certify items for the April ballot.

Because a pending state bill doesn't pre-empt local minimum wage laws passed before August 28, Board of Aldermen members may act fast on passing a minimum wage increase.
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

A required renewal of the city's earnings tax will be on the April ballot.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen on Friday approved the measure authorizing the vote. Mayor Francis Slay will sign it as soon as possible.

A piece of concrete from the city's municipal garage sits on the table in a Ways and Means committee hearing on Jan. 15 2016. Funds in a $25 million general obligation bond would fund repairs to the garage.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

April 2016 is shaping up to be a very crowded ballot in the city of St. Louis.

The Ways and Means Committee on Friday approved a $25 million bond issue to fund some critical capital needs in the city. Earlier this week,  the same committee passed legislation that sets up the required voter approval of the city's earnings tax.

A view looking out on the rotunda from the second floor of St. Louis city hall.
File photo| St. Louis Public Radio

A major source of revenue for the city of St. Louis is one step closer to appearing on the city’s April 5 ballot. The Board of Alderman’s Ways and Means Committee approved a measure to renew the city’s 1 percent earnings tax Wednesday.

In 2010, Missouri voters passed a state law requiring cities who charge earnings tax to put renewing the tax to a public vote every five years. After passing with ease in 2011, it’s time for St. Louis voters to weigh in once more.

Veronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The city’s comptroller says she has a way to get the St. Louis Fire Department the equipment it needs, without raising taxes.

Darlene Green has asked aldermen to pass a $25 million general obligation bond issue so the department can purchase at least some of the new trucks it needs. All of its vehicles are at least 10 years old, and back-up equipment was built in 1989.

Mailers distributed by Reinvest STL in support of a $180 million bond issue.
(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A $180 million bond to fund capital expenditures and upgrades to buildings in St. Louis has failed.

Proposition 1 received 61 percent of the vote in unofficial results, but the city charter requires a two-thirds majority for bond issues. Turnout was below 10 percent.

A sampling of mailers sent by Reinvest STL, a committee supporting the city's $180 million bond issue.
(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Voters in St. Louis will go to the polls Tuesday to decide whether the city should borrow $180 million to take care of long-delayed maintenance and other capital needs.

The general obligation bond got on the August ballot at the last possible minute. If it passes, bonds will be sold in 2015, and again in 2017. The city estimates the owner of a $125,000 house would pay about $50 more in property taxes each year.

Mayor Francis Slay signs the bill authorizing a vote on new capital-improvement bonds.
Provided by the mayor's office.

After nearly 14 months of political gridlock, a $180 million bond issue is on its way to St. Louis voter in an August election.

The Board of Aldermen approved, and Mayor Francis Slay signed the authorizing bill Tuesday. The bonds would help pay for major capital needs like road and bridge projects, new equipment for the fire department and upgrades to the security system at one of the city's two jails. 

kevindooley via Flickr

A $180 million bond issue that would fund critical capital needs like new fire trucks and city building repairs remains on track to go to the voters in August.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen gave their initial approval to the measure Thursday. They will return on Tuesday to send the measure to Mayor Francis Slay for his signature. He must sign the bill, and it must be transported to the city's Board of Election Commissioners, by 5 p.m. on May 26.

kevindooley via Flickr

A $180 million bond issue to address the city's capital needs remains on track for an August vote.

The Ways and Means committee approved the measure Thursday by a 7-1 vote. The committee's chairman, Alderman Steve Conway, was the lone no vote.

fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson at right
Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File photo

The delay in getting a proposed $200 million bond issue in front of St. Louis voters is starting to complicate the process of putting together the city's budget for the 2016 fiscal year.

(via Flickr/iChaz)

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen is unlikely to vote on a $200 million bond issue until after the August primary election. That's because Board president Lewis Reed put a temporary kibosh on bill by tabling any discussion of the issue.

Reed cited a litany of reasons for the delay, including the need to continue negotiations with the mayor's office and fine-tune the bill. 

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

A $200 million dollar city bond issue that would include some money for residents to repair their homes is on its way to the Board of Aldermen. But those funds likely won't be there for long.  

The whole debate started last week, when board president Lewis Reed unveiled a version of the bond issue that included a specific list of projects, such as $10 million in home repair funds.