Jay Nixon

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

 

Updated at 5:45 a.m. to include feature story on the Governor's State of the State Address by Marshall Griffin.

Governor Jay Nixon (D) pitched a $25.7 billion budget to the state of Missouri during Monday’s State of the State Address.  It includes spending increases for K-12 schools, Higher Education, and the proposed Medicaid expansion he’s been calling for since late November.  St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at the Governor’s speech and his proposed spending plan for next year:

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) will lay out his proposed budget tonight (Monday) when he delivers his annual State of the State Address.

The Governor’s address will include his call for expanding Medicaid coverage, which GOP leaders in both chambers have already said won’t happen.  He will also call for more education funding from Kindergarten through college – that would mark an about-face for Higher Education, which has undergone budget cuts for the past three years, including a $9 million cut last year.  Nixon is also expected to ask lawmakers to lengthen the state's school year and to spend money on mental health training as a means of improving school safety.

(Courtesy Hawker Beechcraft)

Governor Jay Nixon’s (D) choice to head up his Office of Administration will have to wait a bit longer before permanently taking over.

Acting Commissioner Doug Nelson’s confirmation is being delayed in the Missouri Senate after news broke that the State Highway Patrol spent around $5.6 million on a new airplane, which has been designated for use by the Governor and other statewide officials.  State Senator Kurt Schaefer (R, Columbia), who sponsored Nelson’s nomination, first wants to know who made the decision to buy the plane, and why.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Jan 24, 2013
Alex Heuer

Jason Rosenbaum is out this week, so we have St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin filling in. Marshall joins Jo Mannies of the St. Louis Beacon and Chris McDaniel of St. Louis Public Radio to discuss the week in politics.

On this week's show: the special elections bill that's speeding through the statehouse, the early morning voter ID committee and the $6 million plane.

Editor's note: after the recording, the voter ID committee was pushed back to 8 a.m.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

If today's press conference at Oak Brook Elementary in the Parkway School District is any indication, Gov. Jay Nixon hopes to make investment in education a focal point as he starts his second term.

Details - including exact dollar amounts - will have to wait for Monday's State of the State address. But the Democrat Nixon says the new money will span from early childhood to college. His initiatives include:

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Legislation to require special elections in Missouri to fill vacancies in statewide offices has cleared another hurdle.

The bill today easily passed the House Rules Committee and is expected to be debated on the floor of the House next week.  If passed, House Bill 110 would only allow the governor to appoint a temporary placeholder if a statewide office is vacated, and that person would be ineligible to run in the special election to fill the vacancy.  State Representative Jeff Roorda (D, Barnhart) sits on the Rules Committee and cast one of the few “no” votes.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee has overwhelmingly passed legislation that would require special elections to fill vacancies in statewide offices.

House Bill 110 would require special elections if the office of Lt. Governor or any other statewide office is suddenly vacated.  It would allow the Governor to only appoint a placeholder who would temporarily fill the office but not be eligible to run in the special election.  It’s sponsored by House Speaker Pro-tem Jason Smith (R, Salem).

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Jay Nixon (D) has been sworn in for his second and final four-year term as Missouri Governor.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri’s inauguration day has arrived, as Governor Jay Nixon (D) and several other state office holders prepare to be sworn in.

It’ll be the second term for most of those taking the oath of office, including Democrats Nixon, Attorney General Chris Koster, and State Treasurer Clint Zweifel.  Fellow Democrat Jason Kander, the incoming Secretary of State, will be the only statewide office newcomer.  Republican Lt. Governor Peter Kinder will be taking the oath of office for the third time, and his third term may prove to be very short if his bid to replace southeast Missouri Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson (R) succeeds.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Aside from Medicaid expansion, the most talked-about issue so far during the just-begun Missouri legislative session is whether Governor Jay Nixon (D) has the authority to appoint a new Lt. Governor if Peter Kinder succeeds fellow Republican Jo Ann Emerson in Congress.

Following his annual Prayer Breakfast earlier today, Governor Nixon told reporters he believes he has the authority to appoint a new Lt. Governor if the office suddenly becomes vacant.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) will deliver his 2013 State of the State Address three weeks from today.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers return to Jefferson City this week for the start of the 2013 regular session.  So far it appears that this year’s dominating issue will be the expansion of Medicaid, which Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has called for and which Republican leaders in both chambers say won’t happen.  St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at that looming battle and other issues facing Missouri lawmakers this year.

Medicaid Expansion

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Gov. Jay Nixon is using his bully pulpit to push for the reinstatement of some exemptions to Missouri’s Sunshine Law.

The Democrat joined officers and commanders from several local police departments as well as school officials to ask lawmakers to make that a priority when they return to Jefferson City on Wednesday.

via Flickr/yomanimus

A conservative group is calling on Governor Jay Nixon (D) and Missouri lawmakers to return any budget surplus there may be next year to taxpayers.

Nixon and GOP legislative leaders are expecting a 3.1 percent growth in state revenues during the next fiscal year.  Patrick Werner heads the Missouri Chapter of Americans for Prosperity, which advocates for fiscally conservative practices.  He says any left over money should either be returned to taxpayers or socked away in the state’s Rainy Day fund.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) has unveiled more of his agenda for the upcoming legislative session.

In addition to expanding Medicaid, Nixon says he wants to consolidate the regulatory commissions within the Department of Natural Resources.

“I think we have too many commissions (at DNR)," Nixon said.  "I think narrowing those, while continuing to protect air and water, will get more efficiency in that area so that resources can be focused appropriately.”

GOP Donors In The Giving Mood

Dec 24, 2012
_J_D_R_ / Flickr

Wealthy Republican donors started Christmas early.

Somewhat uncharacteristically, GOP donor David Humphreys donated $25 thousand to Democratic Governor Jay Nixon on Friday.

Humphreys is the head of a Joplin based roofing company and usually donates exclusively to Republicans – in fact, he donated about 1 and a half million dollars to conservatives and conservative organizations just this year.

Nixon was the only major Democrat Humphreys supported.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) is voicing opposition to House Republicans’ plans to allow teachers in Missouri to carry guns in classrooms.

In a letter to the state’s public school superintendents, Nixon says the proposal would put children at risk and take away the authority of local school districts to keep guns out of classrooms.  Scott Holste is the governor’s Press Secretary.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Gov. Jay Nixon's administration is bolstering his plan to expand Missouri's Medicaid program with an analysis estimating that it could save the state money in the near future.

Figures released this past week by Nixon's budget office show Missouri could see a nearly $47 million increase in general revenues during the first year of the Medicaid expansion in 2014. That boost in state revenues would grow to nearly $140 million in 2016 before beginning to decline.

s_falkow | Flickr

The Humane Society of the United States and two Missouri-based non-profit animal groups are waiting to hear if the State Supreme Court will take up their appeal on what they describe as a crippling regulation.

The plaintiffs say the animal adoption tax levied on non-profit shelters and rescue groups can cost them up to $2,500 a year, making it hard to feed and find homes for the animals in their care.  Amanda Good is the HSUS State Director for Missouri.

“For the smaller shelters, that’s actually a significant chunk of their budget, money that should be spent on helping the animals and caring for the animals," Good said.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A rumored threat made against Missouri Governor Jay Nixon (D) has turned out to be false, according to the State Highway Patrol.

It centered on alleged comments in which someone was quoted as saying they wanted to hire someone to kill the governor.  MSHP Captain Tim Hull says they wrapped up their investigation this afternoon.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) on Monday stopped short of saying that Missouri needs any new laws regarding gun control, mental illness or school safety – but he did tell reporters that his administration may call for legislation designed to better protect school children from tragedies like the one last week Newtown, Conn.

How Much Will Emerson's Special Election Cost?

Dec 14, 2012
Rep. Emerson's flickr page.

Electing a replacement for retiring Missouri U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson won't come cheap.

Weeks after winning re-election to a 10th term, the Cape Girardeau Republican announced earlier this month she is retiring from Congress in February to become president and CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

Missouri Foundation for Health

Most Missourians support Medicaid expansion and believe the state government has a responsibility to ensure access to affordable health care, according to a new survey by the Missouri Foundation for Health.

What's particularly noteworthy about this survey is that a majority of the responders agreed this is a responsibility that must be met, even if it means raising taxes. 55 percent of responders say Missouri's state government must act to do so, while 34 percent say we can't afford it.

Mo. Gov. Nixon Spent $15.5M On Re-Election

Dec 7, 2012
(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon spent $15.5 million on his re-election campaign and still has hundreds of thousands of dollars left over.

Campaign finance reports released Thursday show Nixon's fundraising committee had a balance of nearly $414,000 at the start of December.

Nixon has changed his committee to indicate that he now is seeking an unspecified statewide office in 2016 and has given it a new name - "A Better Missouri With Governor Jay Nixon."

U.S. Dept. of Defense

Governor Jay Nixon (D) is in Afghanistan visiting members of the Missouri National Guard who won’t be home for the holidays.

The governor arrived in Kuwait Tuesday afternoon and visited guardsmen and women from Springfield and Sedalia before moving on to Afghanistan.  Once there, he visited an engineer company from Farmington and the surrounding area.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

People and groups who work with Medicaid clients urged Missouri lawmakers today to expand coverage in next year’s state budget.

Cynthia Keele from NAMI Missouri (National Alliance on Mental Illness) told a State House budget subcommittee that expanding Medicaid would help families dealing with medical debt.

“Missouri medical debt is responsible for about 40 percent of the bankruptcies in Missouri, and I know that because I’m a banker’s wife," Keele said.  "Those bankruptcies and medical debt kill jobs.”

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Nov 29, 2012

St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon's Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about a few political issues.

 

On this week's episode: Nixon taking a stance on Medicaid expansion, Missouri Republican plans to cut taxes and St. Louis County's LGBT non-discrimination ordinance.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

Follow Jo Mannies on Twitter@jmannies

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Nov 20, 2012

It's the Thanksgiving Politically Speaking podcast, and we're thankful for all of our listeners.

St. Louis Public Radio's Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon's Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about a few political issues.

On the table for this week: GOP dissent on health exchanges, the recent ruling on public employee's right to collective bargain and the new bipartisan debt group in Missouri. And, of course, some talk about Governor Jay Nixon's deer "harvesting" and Gobbles the Turkey.

(via Flickr/KOMUnews)

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder is urging state lawmakers to not create a health insurance exchange or expand Medicaid when they convene for their regular session next year.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Nov 15, 2012

Chris McDaniel of St. Louis Public Radio joins Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum of the St. Louis Beacon to discuss a few political issues.

On this week's podcast: After the GOP's lackluster performance in Missouri's statewide races, what can the party do going forward? It's early, but ballot initiatives are already in discussion for 2014. And leadership positions have now been divvied out in the Missouri legislature. How will the Republican leaders work with Democratic Governor Jay Nixon?

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